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alanamoana

The Supreme eG Pastry and Baking Challenge (Round 9)

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And now for Round 9!!!

I'm challenging dejaq, a.k.a. Michael Robert Porru, and I'm very excited about it. When he first started posting I wasn't sure where he was coming from...his avatar was at one point Neo from "The Matrix"...now I know what he's all about:

GREAT DESSERTS, ALL THE TIME!!!!

As a professional in the field and it coming up on a holiday, I know he's going to be very busy this week however he graciously accepted the challenge, so here it is:

In keeping with the holiday theme and even though it is a bit early, I'd like for you to create a dessert that helps to ring in the New Year! When I think of celebrating the New Year, the first thing that comes to mind is CHAMPAGNE. In winter we have CITRUS FRUIT and not much else, it can be tough on a menu.

Please use CHAMPAGNE, at least three different types of CITRUS FRUIT and just for kicks AGAR AGAR in a dessert. However, don't make the expected champagne gelee (that's why I chose agar because you have to boil your mixture and that won't taste as good). I know we were both responding to a post by Filipe about champagne and gelatin so this might sound familiar!

Good luck, I know I can't wait to see the results!

Here's a list of our previous challenges:

Round 1 (Kerry Beal challenges Ling in Vancouver BC)- Take pineapple upside down cake and bring it into this century

Round 2 (Ling Challenges Gfron1 in Silver City NM) - Make a dessert containing an animal ingredient or product other than lard or bacon

Round 3 (Gronf1 challenges Mette in Copenhagen Denmark)- Create a deconstructed beer dessert

Round 4 (Mette Challenges Shalmanese in Seattle WA) - Create a dessert tapas plate consisting of 7 items in 7 days, using local and seasonal flavours

Round 5 (Shalmanese challenges Chiantiglace in West Palm Beach FL) - create a dessert involving smoke that evokes Autumn

Round 6 (Chiantiglace challenges K8Memphis in Memphis, TN) - create a dessert using Southern Sweet Tea

Round 7 (K8Memphis challenges SweetSide in rural CT) - create a desset using 5 kernels of corn representing the 5 blessing of the Pilgrims

Round 8 (SweetSide challenges alanamoana in the Silicon Valley, CA) - take fruitcake out of the land of the misfits and show us the beauty that lies within


Edited by Smithy Adjusted title to show sequence (log)

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Thanks once again for considering me, you have done an outststanding job.

I humbly accept your challenge, and will see what I can muster up in a fairly busy week.

Alana, you are most kind in both your consideration of it being a Holiday week, and your complements regarding my work. I guess after having done it for nearly quarter of a lifetime, if I didn’t know something about the craft by this point, I should probably be making Sandwiches at Quiznos.

I am delighted with your challenge!

I am one of those people that actually gets a “kick from champagne” and have enjoyed using over the years. It’s a lot of fun, and when I think Champagne, I think “Celebrations”.

Michael Robert Porru :smile:

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Too Cool!!! Great choice of challenge and Challengee/Challenger, er agh I mean Michael is a great pastry dude.

!!!Go Michael, Go Michael, Go Michael!!!

:raz:


Edited by K8memphis (log)

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I am sooo looking forward to this one! I agree with K8 and Alana -- great pairing of challenge and challengee.


Cheryl, The Sweet Side

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Great Challenge !

I just saw this now, but today I've tried my so desired champagne gelee. (already posted a picture)... and my conclusion was that indeed it's not easy to assemble the champagne flavour in a pastry item...so this challenge comes right in the exact time for some answers/solutions. And I bet dejaq will offer us great results!

As for the citrus... YUZU sounds like a very nice "pair" for champagne...


Edited by filipe (log)

Filipe A S

pastry student, food lover & food blogger

there's allways room for some more weight

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Yuzu does sound terrific Filipe, thank you.

our local gourmet supplier indicates last time I spoke to him, that just like Pomegranate, the price of Yuzu is thru the roof, I mean nearly 100.00 USD for a liter, ouch! My Exec would have kittens if we paid that, he is always trying to trim up FC, and so am I.

I have been kicking around several ideas, and the context of the dessert is secure, but I am now working on making it fun, yet elegant.

New Years Poppers, horns, Confetti, Masks, Tiaras, Serpentines, blowouts, and noise makers all offer ideas.

To crossover to your other post on the gelee, have you considered Pears, white raisins, orange, Peaches, mint or lemon.

I know what you mean by a winey flavor,you may try using a Brut, or better yet, a late harvest Vidal, the flavors blend better, less harsh.

I am hitting the hay in about 15, I am shot, Thanksgiving, I am glad it only comes once a year, my waistline and my schedule wouldn't allow otherwise.

Michael Robert Porru

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I instantly had the idea of champagne with xanthan suspending agar pearls of lemon, orange, grapefruit, and blood orange.


Dean Anthony Anderson

"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This

Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

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Just an update everyone,

I am about 90% complete this evening with Turkey Day stuff, and I am going to be going in early these next two days to sew everthing up, including a nice photoshoot on friday morning before the droves arrive. I did go shopping today for some nice citrus fruits, along with a few other components. now all that has to be done is to set aside some early morning hours and knock it out.

BTW I will not be posting the final EG pics nor the recipes untill Sat or Sun, my next day off will be Sat, and I will have time to put it together in Photoshop and Adobe Dimensions.

thanks for understanding, and your patience, there is just a whole lot of other fun stuff going on also right now.

Happy Thanksgiving everyone.

Michael Robert Porru

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Michael, we completely understand with the timing, etc. I had wanted to postpone the challenge a week, but not everyone shared my view :hmmm: ...we are, after all, an international website.

At any rate, I personally can't wait to see your creation because I know it will be phenomenal.

Have a great turkey day.

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Yuzu does sound terrific Filipe, thank you.

our local gourmet supplier indicates last time I spoke to him, that just like Pomegranate, the price of Yuzu is thru the roof, I mean nearly 100.00 USD for a liter, ouch! My Exec would have kittens if we paid that, he is always trying to trim up FC, and so am I.

I am definitely in the wrong business. I need to start selling pomegranate juice, which I can get here for about 3USD for a liter.

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Yuzu does sound terrific Filipe, thank you.

our local gourmet supplier indicates last time I spoke to him, that just like Pomegranate, the price of Yuzu is thru the roof, I mean nearly 100.00 USD for a liter, ouch! My Exec would have kittens if we paid that, he is always trying to trim up FC, and so am I.

I am definitely in the wrong business. I need to start selling pomegranate juice, which I can get here for about 3USD for a liter.

Well..as for me I've already ordered some yuzu-tree seeds...maybe in ten years I might turn myself into the only european yuzu-farmer eheh

As for the prices... I've bought bottled yuzu juice at a japanese grocery store in Paris for 8 euros per each 75ml bottle, that makes around $140,00 per liter ...


Edited by filipe (log)

Filipe A S

pastry student, food lover & food blogger

there's allways room for some more weight

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I trust everyone had a pleasant and safe Thanksgiving.

All things considered, a bit of a hectic week on my side, the buffet on Thursday, along with keeping up with the regular routine of daily production, kept us busy.

Now for the build out, I did some research and came up with the following.

Although I originally was going to go with a Tapas theme revolving around dessert Hors D’ oeuvres in miniature, I decided to break down the components into some of the articles specific to New Years.

The dessert is entitled, “ a warm Macedonia of Winter Citrus Fruits”

The components are as follows:

an Orange Chiboust

a Champagne Marmalade of Citrus including Clementine, Tangerine, and Ruby Red Grapefruit made pomegranate and with Agar Agar.

a Breton Pastry filling

Lemon Curd

Agar Agar Citrus Confetti

an Orange Tuile Horn

Pulled sugar serpentines

Lime crème brulee "Legos"

Lemon Verbena Sorbet

Dots of Mango, Cassis Coulis

As you can see, it gets a bit sophisticated.

Keeping in step with the New Years theme, I wanted to make this fun, inviting and familiar. Years ago, I had something similar to the compote, but with different fruits when I vacationed in Milan.

The Champagne and lighter notes of citrus go well together, offering a delicate balance.

The textures that come into play once you start eating are crispy, smooth, cool and refreshing, a real palate cleanser, and not overly filling, commanding you to perhaps wish you had more.

I want to thank Joseph Canlas, and our Chef Jim Collins for allowing after hour clock time to “tinker”.

Desserts like this, and the build out for the Consortium would not be possible if you didn't give me 100% free Artistic licence and believe in what I was doing and how important it is. This venue here at FountainRock, was a leap of faith after the tumultuous Maelstrom of disorganization at Classic.

Jean Paul, I feel for you my brother, you are a masochistic glutton for punishment.

Friends, all I can say, is anyone can put something like this together; you just have to immerse yourself in the medium and know what works well together. It you are new to the industry, invest heavily into yourself. Try a lot of new things, and don’t be afraid of making mistakes. If you learn something new, that’s all that matters.

I would also like to thank Kerry, the Architect of this insidious plot to broaden Chefs horizons.

Enjoy!,

Michael :smile:

gallery_21390_3929_790465.jpg

gallery_21390_3929_588232.jpg

gallery_21390_3929_574619.jpg

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Wow. I don't know how anyone can follow that.

I love the whole presentation, but especially the lime creme brulee legos.

Great work!

Thank you for taking time during one of your busiest times of the year. We are very honored.

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Wow. I don't know how anyone can follow that.

I love the whole presentation, but especially the lime creme brulee legos.

Great work!

Thank you for taking time during one of your busiest times of the year. We are very honored.

you are most welcome Michelle,

time to me is a constant, if it's important enough, you make the time...

Michael :smile:

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Wow!  WOW! WOW!!

These desserts just keep getting more amazing.  Michael tell us more about the confetti and 'lego'.

It looks delicious by the way.

Thank you, most kind,

the Confetti was made with a citrus compound and Agar Agar, there were starch molds made and the mixture was poured into set.

the Lego was a gellified creme brulee, the forms were made from bubble wrap.

Michael :smile:

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Thats pretty cool. I wish we could have had time to discuss it as you were putting it together, but unfortunately its one of those weeks. Maybe during holliday weeks we should try to aim for people in professions that allow them time off :biggrin::hmmm: .

did you roll the citrus pearls in sugar?

I have to say that the pulled sugar really helps create the party feel.

And I never thought about using a textured mat to cook custard in. I am surprised that never occured to me. Now about 100 new possibilities opened up in my mind.

wonderful work, and I hope you had a good thanksgiving too.

Oh and, is there champagne in the sorbet by chance?


Dean Anthony Anderson

"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This

Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

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I trust everyone had a pleasant and safe Thanksgiving.

...The dessert is entitled, “ a warm Macedonia of Winter Citrus Fruits”

The components are as follows:

an Orange Chiboust

a Champagne Marmalade of Citrus including Clementine, Tangerine, and Ruby Red Grapefruit made pomegranate and with Agar Agar.

a Breton Pastry filling

Lemon Curd

Agar Agar Citrus Confetti

an Orange Tuile Horn

Pulled sugar serpentines

Lime crème brulee "Legos"

Lemon Verbena Sorbet

Dots of Mango, Cassis Coulis

As you can see, it gets a bit sophisticated.

Keeping in step with the New Years theme, I wanted to make this fun, inviting and familiar. Years ago, I had something similar to the compote, but with different fruits when I vacationed in Milan.

The Champagne and lighter notes of citrus go well together, offering a delicate balance.

The textures that come into play once you start eating are crispy, smooth, cool and refreshing, a real palate cleanser, and not overly filling, commanding you to perhaps wish you had more.

I want to thank Joseph Canlas, and our Chef Jim Collins for allowing after hour clock time to “tinker”.

Desserts like this, and the build out for the Consortium would not be possible if you didn't give me 100% free Artistic licence and believe in what I was doing and how important it is. This venue here at FountainRock, was a leap of faith after the tumultuous Maelstrom of disorganization at Classic.

Jean Paul, I feel for you my brother, you are a masochistic glutton for punishment.

Friends, all I can say, is anyone can put something like this together; you just have to immerse yourself in the medium and know what works well together. It you are new to the industry, invest heavily into yourself. Try a lot of new things, and don’t be afraid of making mistakes. If you learn something new, that’s all that matters.

I would also like to thank Kerry, the Architect of this insidious plot to broaden Chefs horizons.

Enjoy!,

Michael  :smile:

gallery_21390_3929_790465.jpg

gallery_21390_3929_588232.jpg

gallery_21390_3929_574619.jpg

Way too friggin' cool.

Umm, that's one thing Chef-boy always tells me, is to leave them wanting more. And in fact, let's work on a better picture of the tuille horn... : )

So after my eyes gorged and feasted sufficiently, I got out the dictionary :raz:

"Chiboust:

A custard made originally as the filling for the gâteau Saint- Honor, consisting of pastry cream lightened with Italian meringue and stabilized with gelatine."

With many thanks to cdkitchen.com for the definition

Umm, then I thought what in the world is a legos?? Hahaha, I almost looked it up!! The light came on just in time :laugh: duh, Kate!

Way too cool and it is glimmering shimmering New Year's with the great curliques radiating out from the center. It seems so perfectly proportioned too. I love the way the grapefruit sections continue the the dessert is circulating idea from the center like a New Year's fireworks explosion or one of those sparkling revolving disco balls shimmering shock waves of flavor far and wide. And then the stunningly sophisticated but still playful lego tossed in casual like a Christmas toy left out of the toy box while the owner sleeps and the grown ups bring in the New Year.

And what clean bright flavors I'm imagining are going on--perfect for not only celebrating January one but also toasting with the champagne. Cheers! It is very put away the old and bring in the new.

Shit, you're good.

(way beyond)


Edited by K8memphis (log)

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I trust everyone had a pleasant and safe Thanksgiving.

...The dessert is entitled, “ a warm Macedonia of Winter Citrus Fruits”

The components are as follows:

an Orange Chiboust

a Champagne Marmalade of Citrus including Clementine, Tangerine, and Ruby Red Grapefruit made pomegranate and with Agar Agar.

a Breton Pastry filling

Lemon Curd

Agar Agar Citrus Confetti

an Orange Tuile Horn

Pulled sugar serpentines

Lime crème brulee "Legos"

Lemon Verbena Sorbet

Dots of Mango, Cassis Coulis

As you can see, it gets a bit sophisticated.

Keeping in step with the New Years theme, I wanted to make this fun, inviting and familiar. Years ago, I had something similar to the compote, but with different fruits when I vacationed in Milan.

The Champagne and lighter notes of citrus go well together, offering a delicate balance.

The textures that come into play once you start eating are crispy, smooth, cool and refreshing, a real palate cleanser, and not overly filling, commanding you to perhaps wish you had more.

I want to thank Joseph Canlas, and our Chef Jim Collins for allowing after hour clock time to “tinker”.

Desserts like this, and the build out for the Consortium would not be possible if you didn't give me 100% free Artistic licence and believe in what I was doing and how important it is. This venue here at FountainRock, was a leap of faith after the tumultuous Maelstrom of disorganization at Classic.

Jean Paul, I feel for you my brother, you are a masochistic glutton for punishment.

Friends, all I can say, is anyone can put something like this together; you just have to immerse yourself in the medium and know what works well together. It you are new to the industry, invest heavily into yourself. Try a lot of new things, and don’t be afraid of making mistakes. If you learn something new, that’s all that matters.

I would also like to thank Kerry, the Architect of this insidious plot to broaden Chefs horizons.

Enjoy!,

Michael  :smile:

gallery_21390_3929_790465.jpg

gallery_21390_3929_588232.jpg

gallery_21390_3929_574619.jpg

Way too friggin' cool.

Umm, that's one thing Chef-boy always tells me, is to leave them wanting more. And in fact, let's work on a better picture of the tuille horn... : )

So after my eyes gorged and feasted sufficiently, I got out the dictionary :raz:

"Chiboust:

A custard made originally as the filling for the gâteau Saint- Honor, consisting of pastry cream lightened with Italian meringue and stabilized with gelatine."

With many thanks to cdkitchen.com for the definition

Umm, then I thought what in the world is a legos?? Hahaha, I almost looked it up!! The light came on just in time :laugh: duh, Kate!

Way too cool and it is glimmering shimmering New Year's with the great curliques radiating out from the center. It seems so perfectly proportioned too. I love the way the grapefruit sections continue the the dessert is circulating idea from the center like a New Year's fireworks explosion or one of those sparkling revolving disco balls shimmering shock waves of flavor far and wide. And then the stunningly sophisticated but still playful lego tossed in casual like a Christmas toy left out of the toy box while the owner sleeps and the grown ups bring in the New Year.

And what clean bright flavors I'm imagining are going on--perfect for not only celebrating January one but also toasting with the champagne. Cheers! It is very put away the old and bring in the new.

Shit, you're good.

(way beyond)

you are way too cool, I am only sorry we didn't hook up and have a cup of coffee while I was still at Yum Yum...

Time will catch up with us to be certain...

Thanks,

Michael

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Thats pretty cool.  I wish we could have had time to discuss it as you were putting it together, but unfortunately its one of those weeks.  Maybe during holliday weeks we should try to aim for people in professions that allow them time off  :biggrin:  :hmmm: .

did you roll the citrus pearls in sugar?

I have to say that the pulled sugar really helps create the party feel.

And I never thought about using a textured mat to cook custard in.  I am surprised that never occured to me.  Now about 100 new possibilities opened up in my mind.

wonderful work, and I hope you had a good thanksgiving too.

Oh and, is there champagne in the sorbet by chance?

Yes Anthony, the Confetti was rinsed and rolled in sugar, and the Lemon sorbet doesn't have Champagne in it.

Michael

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Michael, I knew you were up to (and way beyond) this challenge. Thanks again for taking this on during a totally hectic week. What a beautiful and I'm sure flavorful dessert!!! Great work!

edited to add: i also love that it seems like a very "light" dessert. something that someone would order even if they didn't want dessert because it seems like a salad. the dish also has great visual appeal without seeming too busy on the plate.


Edited by alanamoana (log)

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...

Shit, you're good.

(way beyond)

I think K8 summed it up pretty well with that line!

It is truly a festive dessert, and those curliques so remind me of the streamers in Times Square being thrown from the windows above.

That dessert is cool, light, and very refreshing looking -- just what is needed after a long holiday season of rich food.

Beautiful Michael!


Cheryl, The Sweet Side

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