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eje

eG Foodblog: eje - A Week of Porridge

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WOW Tag you're it...

Funny how the blog connects.

I followed  close behind Judith From Umbria.. who I have met and then did mine...and now back to SF.. I lived and worked there for 7 years ( Stanford Court  Hotel) before moving to Florence in 1984.

Love the nieghborhoods, lived in Cole Valley, then the Avenues,  Nob Hill, Russian Hill and finally my favorite.. Potrero Hill!

Thanks Divina!

I really enjoyed your blog. It reminded me how much I would like to get to Italy some day.

Plus, I really want to try that delicious looking boar stew with the chocolate and spices!

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Welcome to blogland. San Francisco is one of my favourite US cities. Love the Halloween parade on Castro street. Do they still have that?

I am also a dragon. And speaking of Chinese, are you going to feature some great San Francisco Chinese food? :wub:

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I have a family member and several friends on both sides of the Bay. I love SF and I'm sure I'll enjoy this blog. Have fun, eje!

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"Games Tester" = clever marketing. Other places its called "software verification & validation" which gives a clue as to how tedious it can be!

Of course, most other sw doesnt come with the need to play it thru at least once, 'to become familiar', or the cool graphics.

The leftovers look delish.

Are those hooks which are making the fab star patterns on the cupboards above the sinks?

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Good morning!

Our day starts when the alarm goes off and we get the latest bad news from our local NPR affiliate KQED.

My wife feeds the cats...

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And I make the coffee...

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Today's porridge is the most basic.

Old fashioned Rolled Oats, raisins, walnuts, honey, and a scoop of plain lowfat yoghurt.

gallery_27569_3867_7012.jpg

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Well, I'm off to eat breakfast and catch the bus, train, train to work.

I'll answer questions and add posts if I have free time during the day; but, I won't be able to upload any more pictures until I get home tonight.

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Heya Erik!

This looks like it will be awesome. Looking forward to seeing some cocktails!

John

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Good morning!

Our day starts when the alarm goes off and we get the latest bad news from our local NPR affiliate KQED.

That's "WHYY" in Philadelphian. Do either you or your wife ever listen to "Fresh Air"? It originates at the station.

My wife feeds the cats...

gallery_27569_3867_4118.jpg

Has anybody tried to undertake a Foodblogger Pet Census? It's been a while since I've seen a pet-less foodblogger, but I'm not at all certain whether cat people (like you and I) outnumber dog people among the foodbloggers or vice versa.

Today's porridge is the most basic.

Old fashioned Rolled Oats, raisins, walnuts, honey, and a scoop of plain lowfat yoghurt.

gallery_27569_3867_7012.jpg

There will be more than porridge on the menu this week, despite your blog title, right?

San Francisco is at the top of my list of American Cities I Must Visit. I wouldn't expect you to hang out in the Castro, but that's one of the places I would very much like to see. (I have a friend, ex-West Chesterite, who lives in SF now. I'm contemplating doing a three-way visit incorporating both seeing him in San Fran and my brother -- and newborn niece! -- in Seattle, but I'm told that doing this by air is crazy expensive. Any suggestions welcome.)

I'm looking forward to your take on Fog City and the culinary scene there. And I have a question for you:

What's San Franciscan for "Reading Terminal Market"?

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Well, I'm off to eat breakfast and catch the bus, train, train to work.

I'll answer questions and add posts if I have free time during the day; but, I won't be able to upload any more pictures until I get home tonight.

Not really on-topic, but please share your commute...

(I refer you to my first foodblog.)

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That's "WHYY" in Philadelphian.  Do either you or your wife ever listen to "Fresh Air"?  It originates at the station.

I listen to it when I get a chance; but, it comes on after I am at work.

We still laugh about the Gene Simmons interview.

There will be more than porridge on the menu this week, despite your blog title, right?

I guess you'll have to wait and see!

San Francisco is at the top of my list of American Cities I Must Visit.  I wouldn't expect you to hang out in the Castro, but that's one of the places I would very much like to see.  (I have a friend, ex-West Chesterite, who lives in SF now.  I'm contemplating doing a three-way visit incorporating both seeing him in San Fran and my brother -- and newborn niece! -- in Seattle, but I'm told that doing this by air is crazy expensive.  Any suggestions welcome.)

We lived for our first 7 years in San Francisco near Dolores Park on the border of the Castro, Noe, and Mission neighborhoods, so, yes, I am very familiar with the Castro. We didn't hang out all that much in the, ahem, "exuberant" bars there; but, we were regulars at the Castro Theater and many of the neighborhood restaurants.

What's San Franciscan for "Reading Terminal Market"?

I've seen the Reading Terminal Market on TV shows and in your blog and am not sure we really have an equivalent. The closest is probably going to be the recently constructed Ferry Building Marketplace. But, the Ferry Building, being recently constructed, seems to me to be much more concentrated on "upscale" stores and patrons. As it seems like it has already been covered multiple times on eGullet, I won't be going there this week. I will instead take you on a tour of the Alemany Farmers' Market, (and perhaps the Daly City 99 Ranch,) on Saturday.

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Welcome to blogland. San Francisco is one of my favourite US cities. Love the Halloween parade on Castro street. Do they still have that?

I am also a dragon. And speaking of Chinese, are you going to feature some great San Francisco Chinese food?  :wub:

The city has done its best to discourage the Halloween Party in the Castro. Initially it was an impromptu party with no city support. For several years the powers that be tried to convince revelers to go to other "official" city parties elsewhere in the city. They were all dismal failures and most partiers continued to gather in the Castro.

The city finally gave up and made the Castro Halloween party city sponsored. Beer gardens, insurance, that sort of thing. Unfortunately, the city sponsored Castro event has been marred by various types of violence for the last couple years. There was some sort of gang related drive-by shooting late at night on the outskirts of the party this year.

It will be interesting to see what the city does next year.

Though, you might be thinking of the San Francisco LGBT Pride Parade and Celebration. That takes place near the end of June and is also a fun event.

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"Games Tester" = clever marketing. Other places its called "software verification & validation" which gives a clue as to how tedious it can be!

Of course, most other sw doesnt come with the need to play it thru at least once, 'to become familiar', or the cool graphics.

The leftovers look delish.

Are those hooks which are making the fab star patterns on the cupboards above the sinks?

True enough. Though, yes, most other "software verification and validation" doesn't give you a chance to blow up your co-workers. So it is still a pretty "sweet" job, even though the pay tends to be pretty crap and the hours long during "crunch mode".

Yeah, they are hooks with star patterns. We've never figured out a good way to anchor them in the plaster wall, though, so they are more decorative than functional.

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I will instead take you on a tour of the Alemany Farmers' Market, (and perhaps the Daly City 99 Ranch,) on Saturday.

Pacific Super on Alemany a mile or so down from the Farmers Market is a good alternative to 99 Ranch. The Daly City 99 Ranch is larger, but I don't think it's better. Kuk Jea in Daly City is the best Korean market in the area and it's right off the freeway. I'm also a big fan of the Alemany Farmers Market - though at the peak of summer, I prefer the Ferry Plaza.

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Have fun this week eje! I did four years on Guerrero in the 20s. We used to call it the "Trans-Mission" because although it was technically Mission, it felt like Noe.

May I assume you know the joys of Mitchell's Ice Cream? If so, and you find it in your way one day this week, a visual revisit of their Mexican Chocolate flavor would be greatly appreciated :wub:

All this talk of cocktails reminds me of my time in SF in the 90s. People were just getting into swing dancing, cocktails and supper clubs. It certainly added a lot of variety to the beer-at-a-bar lifestyle. I enjoy cocktails a lot more now than I used to because of that time of experimentation but I don't think anyone will ever again convince me to have a Harvey Wallbanger :huh:

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Have fun this week eje!  I did four years on Guerrero in the 20s.  We used to call it the "Trans-Mission" because although it was technically Mission, it felt like Noe.

May I assume you know the joys of Mitchell's Ice Cream?  If so, and you find it in your way one day this week, a visual revisit of their Mexican Chocolate flavor would be greatly appreciated  :wub:

[...]

Mitchell's is absolutely on the list, though I prefer their Dulce de Leche.

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Though, you might be thinking of the San Francisco LGBT Pride Parade and Celebration.  That takes place near the end of June and is also a fun event.

No, it is definitely Halloween. I went to the Halloween parade in the 80s. There was no violence and it wants a lot of fun. I was in San Francisco with my then boyfriend and we were told about the parade, so we decided to check it out. We didn't have any costumes to wear and as we were walking down the street, a man in a see through lucite cod piece yelled out, "Hey, I know what you two are dressed as.... a heterosexual couple!" I about fell on the sidewalk laughing. We had a great time people watching. It is a shame the way it has turned out.

Now, back to food...Have you been to Sam Wu's? Does it still exist?


Edited by Swisskaese (log)

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I lived, ate and drank in SF  for six years and often miss it so. Was back this Summer and did Swann Oyster Depot, Delfina, Puerto Allegre, La Taqueria, Shalimar, Tartine and Tu Lan, all the favorites... Perhaps you'll outline the special places for you? 

I also fondly remember drinks at Zodiac and Orbit, but I fear things have changed...

I didn't know you lived here, raxelita. Did you tend bar?

Zodiac Room closed. The new restaurant or club there was/is named to Amber. Not sure if it is still open. I went by the other night and it looked closed.

If you read Imbibe magazine, the new issue (Nov-Dec) has a multi-page feature on Alberta Straub and the Orbit Room.

Amber is a loungy bar and is still open, or at least was last week.

I'm usually at Orbit Room on Tuesday nights and it's still great.


Edited by cstuart (log)

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[...]

Now, back to food...Have you been to Sam Wu's? Does it still exist?

Actually, no, I don't think I've been to Sam Wo's. A few years back the well known rude waiter (Edsel Ford Fong) died; but, the restaurant is still open and going strong.

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I'm lucky enough to have a pretty much door to door commute.

Unfortunately, it involves 3 forms of public transit.

The first leg I take a bus from Bernal Heights to the Glenn Park Bart Station.

Google Maps Link

There I catch the BART inbound to San Francisco.

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I get off at the Civic Center BART station.

Google Maps Link

There I catch an outbound N Judah SF MUNI train.

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I then get off Carl Street and Hillway Avenue.

Google Maps Link

The last part of my commute is on foot. I like to think of it as my aerobic exercise.

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But, this is the view I have to look forward to from our building on a clear day.

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Now, you would think there would be a more direct route to get from my house to work.

Unfortunately, there are a couple big hills, called Twin Peaks(wikipedia), between my house and work, so it's either over or around. And the BART and MUNI trains tend to be more reliable than the busses that go over the hill. Plus the road over the hill is very crooked and riding in rickety old MUNI busses, taking those curves over the speed limit, will put the fear of god in any mortal.

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Exhaustive research into the sandwich makers of the Inner Sunset has led me to the belief that the Andronico's Market...

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...deli Counter...

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...provides the most superior sandwiches I have found so far.

On a lovely day like today, I like to get a sandwich at Andronico's and then walk over the San Francisco Botanical Garden...

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...sit under a tree...

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...look out into the park...

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...and eat my sandwich in the sun.

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Sometimes you can make friends.

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Eventually, it is time to go home.

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Tonight is what we call "Taco Tuesday".

I take the MUNI and the BART and get off at 24th street.

The 24th Street BART station is at Mission and 24th. It is surrounded by the taquerias that create the cream of the San Francisco style mission Burrito.

Taqueria San Jose, La Taqueria, Taqueria Cancun, La Coroneta and Papalote are the true giants of the field.

My wife and I have been on a Paplote jag for a while now.

Outside:

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Inside:

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She picks me up and we go home and watch the new Daily Show and Colbert Report TiVo recorded the night before and eat our burrito and taco.

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Papalote sometimes gets in trouble with puritans insist on enormous greasy slabs of burrito, as theirs tend to be slightly on the small side (comparatively). They are also somewhat more expensive than some of their competition. However, the keys are the delicious salsa and the freshness of their ingredients. The salsa is a delicious, and often quite zesty, combination of roasted tomatoes, other seasonings, and Chile de Arbol.

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Hi Erik:

Great to see you blogging! I too, would like to see some cocktails! Please...

I like your furry friend. Looks like he's enjoying his bit of your sandwich.

We need a fridge shot and a better portrait of the kitties please. :wub:

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Hey, Erik, a surprise blog. Cool. I was born in San Francisco and haven't been back in a long time, so this will be nostalgic for me.

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[...]She picks me up and we go home and watch the new Daily Show and Colbert Report TiVo recorded the night before and eat our burrito and taco.

My favorite shows. But more Daily Show than Colbert.

Nice to read your blog, Erik. Years ago (87) my wife and I lived in a studio in Sunset for a short time. Back then we were paying something > $400 a month just to have a small room. I don't know how people can afford to live in San Francisco nowadays. My dream home would be, of course, one of those that's near Twin Peaks overlooking the Bay. :smile: $5 million or something like that, is it? Perhaps more?

Let's go to Ton Kiang for some dim sum lunch some day. Perhaps with you I would actually get some service. :raz: And after that, you can take me to the Wok Shop to buy the wok burner... LOL :laugh:

Driving in San Francisco is really tough. The MUNI and BART are great ways to get around. Look forward to read more on life in the city.

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