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Need help with a chicken part name


bleudauvergne
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Sot-l’y-laisse - in the Amelie Poulain movie, the grandfather shares this delectable morsel with his grandson. It is that lovely soft and flavorful piece of meat located between the back and the thigh, there is a round indent in the bone and the meat is found there. I need an English equivalent for this term. Can anyone come up with a concise, clear word for this little morsel, not being a scientific term, since this word is required for a food article? Please help me find this word.

Stories on your experiences with it would also help bring out the full meaning... :rolleyes:

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Lucy,

They're called "chicken oysters," and they're my favorite part of the chicken (or turkey!). Just the other day, I read an article online about how some chefs are saving up these morsels for their favorite customers and preparing them with luxury ingredients like shaved truffles. I can't find the link now, but maybe someone else here remembers it -- this particular article can't have been more than a week old. Maybe in Restaurants & Institutions or The New York Times.

SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

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Lucy,

I hope that a butcher will talk about this muscle. Is it the same as a "love handle"?

This same muscle in a steer provides a wonderful steak called an "oyster" or "spider" steak. Unfortunately, it is impossible to find this steak cut in the US. (Something about ruining the porterhouse below!?)

Tim

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Here's my chicken oyster story:

Our son was about 7 and we sometimes went to a neighborhood French restaurant, Chez Jacqueline. The first time we brought Curtis, predictably, he ordered steak. Then, to our horror, he asked for ....ketchup! Eric, the personable, handsome, gregarious, did I mention cute? waiter proceeded to extol the virtues of Bernaise sauce. After that, there was no turning back, Curtis trusted anything that Eric told him. The next time we went, Eric told him where and how to find the chicken oyster. Curtis thought Eric was a god. Chicken oysters go to the fastest in our house, there is absolutely no honor among thieves! :laugh:

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Heh. I had stumbled upon that tasty morsel on the chicken on my own, years before I discovered that other people knew about it, let alone cared about it enough to give it a name. Before that, I thought of it as my little secret--and I wasn't about to give it away! :laugh:

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Ditto on the oyster, even where I'm from, where the luscious little morsels are searched out on chickens, ducks and pheasants, and slurped greedily down, including the microfinitesimal pair on a too-slow quail.

I DO wonder about the save-and-cook method, though. No braise or saute could prepare this wonderful tidbit nearly as well as leaving it in its little nest to cook cuddled into the bone, and certainly no knife in the most impressive arsenal could remove one nearly so well or completely as a seeking tongue.

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Think the oysters have it.

Here's the exact entry from my A-Z of French Food:

" Sol-l'y-laisse: A morsel from just above the inside rump of poultry, considered a great delicacy. Sometimes described in English as "chicken's Oyster", its Franch name translated roughtly, "(only)-a- fool-would-leave-it".

A fool & his oyster are soon parted, but mine never make it to table. Carvers treat.

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The cat and I have one each. No one else in the family knows about them. Cook's perks.

I've always referred to them as "oysters".

sacre bleau!!!!!! zeee cayt??? mon dieu!

-this is how I would speak if I were french, of course.

I actually more of a tail girl, as any part of an animal that essentially fries as it roasts is good in my book.

does this come in pork?

My name's Emma Feigenbaum.

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I actually more of a tail girl, as any part of an animal that essentially fries as it roasts is good in my book.

And the tail would be called the "Pope's nose"...used mainly to describe the tail of a turkey but can be applied to all fowl.

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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The cat and I have one each. No one else in the family knows about them. Cook's perks.

I've always referred to them as "oysters".

I have four deeply beloved cats, but I would never think of sharing this treat with them. What a generous woman you are!

It's the cook's treat at our house, too. And when I'm at relatives' houses, and the turkey is being deboned, I always try to distract the cook long enough to score the oysters for myself. I am incorrigible, unrepentant, and sneaky. And unapologetic.

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I'll cheerfully join the chorus of "oyster" fans, and second Luckylies on the virtues of the tail. That latter may be hereditary, as my mother always made a point of sneaking that little tidbit as soon as a bird hit the table (before, if she was the one cooking it!).

On one occasion, when I was about six, we were visiting at the house of some friends. I wandered in from the living room, where the kids were eating, in time to see Mom in her usual fork-first powerdive at the roast chicken's nether regions.

"Yep," I said, to general hilarity, "ol' Mom sure likes her tail...."

Edited by chromedome (log)

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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My dad, who grew up in a small Missouri town in the earliest decades of the 20th century, always called it the "oyster," and always made sure I got one when we had roast chicken.

We had a lot of issues, my dad and I, but he sure knew his food. I got much of my appreciation of fresh ingredients, simply prepared, from him.

Anyway this is to indicate that "oyster" in this context has been in common parlance in the US for close to a century, and probably longer.

(I've never heard it called "chicken oyster"; in context, that would be redundant.)

Edited by ghostrider (log)

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I read somewhere that a French king ate only that oyster, so his chef removed enough from the chickens and threw the rest of the chickens away!

Also delectable, in the same way, are the cheeks of a fish. A nice big fish has two great tender ones. I never let anyone know about them.

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