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Richard Kilgore

Used Bread Making Machine

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Bake a loaf of bread in it. :)

I've found some recipes off of the king arthur's site that are pretty decent.

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/landin...faultRecipeMain

Even though I use my breadmaker for kneading and then baking seperately in the oven... I think baking in the machine for your first loaf would be nice for the first use just to see if you like it in the machine and if the machine works. Good luck!

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Flour, salt, water and yeast are pretty cheap - I would toss the ingredients in there and let her rip - make sure you will be around to check on it. Either it will work or it won't. It should heat up , then knead, then rest, then knead and then bake - at least that is what mine did for a simple white loaf. If it has a window you can watch the fun!


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Sometimes you can download the instructions booklet for various appliances from the web. If not, maybe you can contact Williams Sonoma. I always feel more secure if I know the instructions even if I get creative later :wink:


Just a simple southern lady lost out west...

"Leave Mother in the fridge in a covered jar between bakes. No need to feed her." Jackal10

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If you're looking for a copy of the user's manual and no one here has one, I've got 2 suggestions. Contact WS and ask them if they can send one. Look on eBay to see if someone is selling one that has the manual. Contact the seller and ask if they will make a copy of the manual and send it to you (you'd pay for the copies/postage). I just had someone do that with a tapedeck I'm selling. :wink:


Deb

Liberty, MO

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You might also find that the manufacturer has a contact number for recipe advice. I have a Panasonic breadmaker and called their recipe advice line for help on adapting a recipe for the machine I have. They were very helpful generally and the advice I received was spot on.

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Just to say that I agree with what someone upthread said.....use the machine to mix and rise your dough, but it will have a much nicer crust and have less chance of failure, if you bake it in the oven.

Good luck--I hope you got one that works


Oil and potatoes both grow underground so french fries may have eventually invented themselves had they not been invented -- J. Esther

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I have aquired a used bread making machine, but have no idea how to use it or if it works. So I would appreciate any ideas about how to check it out and use it. It's a William-Sonoma model.

What brand is it Richard? The "hard" part is figuring out what buttons to push if it's one of the newer machines. Most of the manufacturer's websites will have the manuals posted.

I have been baking Pumpernickel nearly every week for a while now.


Never trust a skinny chef

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Thanks everyone. My main interest is in using it for everything except the baking, but I want to do at least one run from start to finish. I'll try to get a manual from Williams-Sonoma., and I'll post my results.

I have aquired a used bread making machine, but have no idea how to use it or if it works. So I would appreciate any ideas about how to check it out and use it. It's a William-Sonoma model.

What brand is it Richard? The "hard" part is figuring out what buttons to push if it's one of the newer machines. Most of the manufacturer's websites will have the manuals posted.

I have been baking Pumpernickel nearly every week for a while now.

Pumpernickle sounds great to me. The machine is just branded Williams-Sonoma, irodguy. And yes, it's the "which buttons to push" issue. But I think I'll take one try at it before a manual arrives.

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The only thing to be careful about is to first try with a one loaf recipe. Otherwise the mess it makes is awful. Good luck and enjoy.

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