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Pielle

Report of the first Stove Mod in the Universe!

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It was weird to read this post after hearing a story about a local guy who modded his oven to bake pizzas. He somehow bypass the controls on the autoclean function and can get his oven up 775F - which, to my surprise, is a good temperature for baking a pizza (never knew that). I wonder if the commercial stove manufacturers will ever take notice and make these changes. I'd love to buy one that could do these things. Add a high-capacity burner for a wok and I'd have the perfect stove!


Edited by bigkoiguy (log)

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I don't have time to go trolling for it, but wasn't there a guy offering some sort of reward for a replicable, low-cost system for sous-vide? Does that ring a bell with anyone else?

BTW every time I see an old trolling motor for sale on Craigslist I think it would be perfect for kitchen use....

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I don't have time to go trolling for it, but wasn't there a guy offering some sort of reward for a replicable, low-cost system for sous-vide?  Does that ring a bell with anyone else?

Ya, it was Vadouvan in this thread

This thread keeps getting Hilarious....

A circulating bath for $20 to $40 ????

Tell you what. I will personally hand over $500 to anyone who can produce such a device.

Requirements.

1. Water must circulate.

2. Temperature must be measured in increments of tenths of 1 degree.

3.Bath must be insulated

4. After insertion of product, must be able to maintain the exact temperature of  55.8 degrees for

    3 hrs wthout variation of more than 2 degrees at any time.

5. Itemized and verifiable source material cost.

6. For purposes of fairness, I will double your cost lattitude to $80.

let me know when you are done.

Well it may be hard getting everything within the requirements, but I think that, modifing stovetops to get them to be able to control water temp in a pot without compromising any of its other funtionalities would definatly be a winner for most sous vide users.

I would think that the cost of incorporating a cheap TC, adding a PID (or just on/ off) algorithm to already existing electronics to a mass produces stovetop would be very low (below 10$ I would say).

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One year later: how is the mod holding up? Any new insights, features you wished you incorporated?

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Lovely concept! (And neat execution too.)

I particularly like the way in which (as far as possible) this way of doing things is keeping mains electricity out of the way of the user. I haven't seen the particular PID and its enclosure, but I think I'd have removed them a little further away from the steam and grease of everyday cooking...

I'd have been tempted to include a PID&SSR bypass - a simple switch (but rated for the current) to 'heal the cut' in the stove wiring... putting that switch in parallel with the SSR would give the option to make the stove work exactly as usual.

With that switch in place, one could consider a plug/socket connection for the low voltage control connection between the PID and SSR - so that the PID could be completely removed for its own protection when not needed!

I've not seen any mention of what the output of these PIDs looks like... how short a cycle time do they go to - 1/2 a mains cycle?

Typical mechanical (rather than 'electronic') "simmerstats" have switching cycles lasting many seconds, which is why many prefer the 'steadiness' of a gas flame - or at least the rapid electronic, fractional second, cycling of induction.

Hence, I'd be curious enough to consider putting a small lamp (ordinary fridge bulb?), in parallel with the (cooker ring) load, so that I could observe the controller output switching, cycling (or apparently dimming/brightening). That sort of thing might be useful to those struggling to setup their PIDs - having a visualisation of the result of different tuning of the parameters.

Does the SSR get hot? (Or rather, would its longevity be improved by giving it extra cooling?)

EDIT: heat sink for SSR: http://auberins.com/index.php?main_page=pr...&products_id=45

Once again, congratulations on a wonderful project!


Edited by dougal (log)

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You need to patent the smart oven with probe idea for sous vide at home and sell it to all of the high end range people. You could even market gas ranges with one electric eye for this.

Add a 50K BTU burner for a super wok and I am there!


Edited by RAHiggins1 (log)

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Lovely concept! (And neat execution too.)

I particularly like the way in which (as far as possible) this way of doing things is keeping mains electricity out of the way of the user. I haven't seen the particular PID and its enclosure, but I think I'd have removed them a little further away from the steam and grease of everyday cooking...

I'd have been tempted to include a PID&SSR bypass - a simple switch (but rated for the current) to 'heal the cut' in the stove wiring... putting that switch in parallel with the SSR would give the option to make the stove work exactly as usual.

With that switch in place, one could consider a plug/socket connection for the low voltage control connection between the PID and SSR - so that the PID could be completely removed for its own protection when not needed! 

I've not seen any mention of what the output of these PIDs looks like... how short a cycle time do they go to - 1/2 a mains cycle?

Typical mechanical (rather than 'electronic') "simmerstats" have switching cycles lasting many seconds, which is why many prefer the 'steadiness' of a gas flame - or at least the rapid electronic, fractional second, cycling of induction.

Hence, I'd be curious enough to consider putting a small lamp (ordinary fridge bulb?), in parallel with the (cooker ring) load, so that I could observe the controller output switching, cycling (or apparently dimming/brightening). That sort of thing might be useful to those struggling to setup their PIDs - having a visualisation of the result of different tuning of the parameters.

Does the SSR get hot? (Or rather, would its longevity be improved by giving it extra cooling?)

EDIT: heat sink for SSR:  http://auberins.com/index.php?main_page=pr...&products_id=45

Once again, congratulations on a wonderful project!

Cool ideas! Just a thought on the light idea: I think the SSR already has an LED on it which blinks on and off according to the PID's instructions. It might then just be a matter of making the SSR visible.

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