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Not intermezzo - French for _________?


paul o' vendange
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This was, and is, my final answer and I am sticking to it ...

entremets

Main Entry: en·tre·mets

Pronunciation: as sing "än(n)-tr&-'mA, as pl -'mA(z)

Function: noun plural but singular or plural in construction

Etymology: French, from Old French entremes, from entre: between + mes food, dish

dishes served in addition to the main course of a meal

That said, is there some sort of prize?  :laugh:

OOOHHHHHHH no - wait a minute, I do not YET yield the field. I am trying to find a chef from Val's, Toluca Lake, of nearly 20 years ago...then, and only then, do I yield the feuilleté. I mean field. :raz:

-Paul

 

Remplis ton verre vuide; Vuide ton verre plein. Je ne puis suffrir dans ta main...un verre ni vuide ni plein. ~ Rabelais

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The most obvious for me would be "trou normand"

"Entremet", littrealy "between meals" seems right, I do not however, use this word.

gives "Entracte" which more comonly refferts to the break in the middle of a play

It isn't the word.. I gave up on that about midnight ... I know that a true tru normand is appropriate as well but that is more than one word ...

you know, in the end, I think that the answer is here but Paul has confused it with another term .. and, in the end, he'll smack his head and say, "yeah, that was the word I was looking for" and I will collapse in a fit of laughter :laugh: ...ironic laughter at that ... :hmmm:

Oh, there is no doubt that a big "d'oh!" is coming, followed by my hiding my head in a dark closet for a goodly length of time. Just surprised that entremet didn't leap out. What's really weird is that I've used the word on my degustations....and as I usually float fairly well in French, this would be a big gaffe if wrong...

-Paul

 

Remplis ton verre vuide; Vuide ton verre plein. Je ne puis suffrir dans ta main...un verre ni vuide ni plein. ~ Rabelais

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:laugh: Yeah, well now I've caught it from you. I was talking to someone just a bit ago and tried to say the colloquial word for "Mexican corner store" and can not for the life of me think of it though I know I know it well.  :raz: Oh dear.

You mean bodegas?

SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

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:laugh: Yeah, well now I've caught it from you. I was talking to someone just a bit ago and tried to say the colloquial word for "Mexican corner store" and can not for the life of me think of it though I know I know it well.  :raz: Oh dear.

You mean bodegas?

Yes, that's it. :biggrin: Thank you. I kept thinking "albondigas" (which of course means "meatballs") and could not get past that. :blink:

Obviously I have eaten too much Halloween candy over the past several days. :raz:

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:laugh: Yeah, well now I've caught it from you. I was talking to someone just a bit ago and tried to say the colloquial word for "Mexican corner store" and can not for the life of me think of it though I know I know it well.  :raz: Oh dear.

You mean bodegas?

Yes, that's it. :biggrin: Thank you. I kept thinking "albondigas" (which of course means "meatballs") and could not get past that. :blink:

Obviously I have eaten too much Halloween candy over the past several days. :raz:

LOL! I actually had to look it up in something I wrote a while back... I kept thinking "bolillos," which of course means "rolls" (bread).

Yep, it must be the Halloween candy. That's what it is. :wacko:

SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

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Help us out here, Mark, you eat a lot of meals in France  ...

Did you mean me?...

This has been driving me nuts since I read the first post last night - the word is on the tip of my tongue !!! I can hear it now, "As your _______ the chef has sent a sorbet" - but it will not come to mind.

Entremet is not the word used for this; to my understanding, anyway, those are sort of like pre-desserts, not the course Paul is talking about.

I'm going to write to a chef-friend in France and see if I can't give him mental block too!

Overheard at the Zabar’s prepared food counter in the 1970’s:

Woman (noticing a large bowl of cut fruit): “How much is the fruit salad?”

Counterman: “Three-ninety-eight a pound.”

Woman (incredulous, and loud): “THREE-NINETY EIGHT A POUND ????”

Counterman: “Who’s going to sit and cut fruit all day, lady… YOU?”

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Just some more info to confuse... The Epicurean refers to punches and sherbets served after the entree and before the roast but states these items are not given an extra heading on a menu.

and this page simply refers to it as sorbet.

N.

"The main thing to remember about Italian food is that when you put your groceries in the car, the quality of your dinner has already been decided." – Mario Batali
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I suggest PMing eGulleter Daniel Rogov. He has probably forgotten more than most of us will ever know of such matters.

I thought of that yesterday .. but now I have taken your advice .. you're probably right .. he'll know ...

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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The correct term is entremets du palatine but that has not been in use since the 16th century, current practice being simply to serve the sorbet between the first and the main course. Oddly enough, even in the magnificent language of Descartes, there is no term that has been recognized by the Academie Francaise to describe what the English and Americans call "a palate cleanser".

As to the difference between amuse bouche and amuse geule, simply ask any Parisian or Lyonnaise lady of the night. For many years the two terms were used interchangeably until it suddenly dawned on French chefs that the amuse geule had come to be synonymous with "une pipe". Should anyone not know what "une pipe" is best to send me a private message.

On that smiling note....

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Could you be thinking of releve?

all I found on releve was that it is a ballet term .. nothing culinary showed up in my search ...

Actually, this did come up originally - and I was almost certain it was the word. However, My wife, who is similarly consternated, said it was not. But releve - "remove" - is used. See Food Courses - see under "France".

Racheld, thanks - this may be the one I was thinking of. I am now totally flabbergasted, as this word was in such common usage that it should be leaping off the page at me...

-Paul

 

Remplis ton verre vuide; Vuide ton verre plein. Je ne puis suffrir dans ta main...un verre ni vuide ni plein. ~ Rabelais

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The correct term is entremets du palatine but that has not been in use since the 16th century, current practice being simply to serve the sorbet between the first and the main course.  Oddly enough, even in the magnificent language of Descartes, there is no term that has been recognized by the Academie Francaise to describe what the English and Americans call "a palate cleanser".

As to the difference between amuse bouche and amuse geule, simply ask any Parisian or Lyonnaise lady of the night.  For many years the two terms were used interchangeably until it suddenly dawned on French chefs that the amuse geule had come to be synonymous with "une pipe". Should anyone not know what "une pipe" is best to send me a private message.

On that smiling note....

Hahaha. Well, on this note, I will yield, and enjoyably so. Thank you, Daniel, Gifted, Racheld, everyone. I may have just been on a complete brain warp - I hope this doesn't augur future forgetfulness.

Thanks again, everyone.

Paul

-Paul

 

Remplis ton verre vuide; Vuide ton verre plein. Je ne puis suffrir dans ta main...un verre ni vuide ni plein. ~ Rabelais

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I am now totally flabbergasted, as this word was in such common usage that it should be leaping off the page at me...

Well then, it might be a case of mass hallucination or something of the sort, for I *still* think there is a word such as you describe, as does Mark. :biggrin:

But that may be just because of your persuasiveness. I dunno. :laugh:

I still expect that sometime, maybe several months from now, the word will just jump into my mind. It is definitely in hiding at the moment, for sure.

Till then,

I'm off to take some Ginko Biloba,

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I am now totally flabbergasted, as this word was in such common usage that it should be leaping off the page at me...

Well then, it might be a case of mass hallucination or something of the sort, for I *still* think there is a word such as you describe, as does Mark. :biggrin:

But that may be just because of your persuasiveness. I dunno. :laugh:

I still expect that sometime, maybe several months from now, the word will just jump into my mind. It is definitely in hiding at the moment, for sure.

Till then,

I'm off to take some Ginko Biloba,

Hahahah - you and me both, Carrot. I used it on my menus, even - and am starting to get scared. :blink:

:raz:

-Paul

 

Remplis ton verre vuide; Vuide ton verre plein. Je ne puis suffrir dans ta main...un verre ni vuide ni plein. ~ Rabelais

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Safe to say: The Daniel has spoken ... his words are, as always, unimpeachable and ring true to anyone who knows their food ... much appreciated as always .. now about those Parisian or Lyonnaise ladies of the night ... :wink:

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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Safe to say: The Daniel has spoken ... his words are, as always, unimpeachable and ring true to anyone who knows their food ... much appreciated as always .. now about those Parisian or Lyonnaise ladies of the night ... :wink:

Well, that may be, and given the preponderance of evidence, I have rendered up my sword. But as Carrot Top has alluded, there is a word out there - my wife shares my nagging thought, as we both worked in restaurants where the word was used - myself, in Los Angeles and Chicago, herself, in Chicago. The frequency with which it was used, and the fact I used it myself in my menus, makes it all the more troubling.

I will continue to mole under the surface, and return, like the Hohenstauffen, with a monumental "AHA!" :biggrin:

-Paul

 

Remplis ton verre vuide; Vuide ton verre plein. Je ne puis suffrir dans ta main...un verre ni vuide ni plein. ~ Rabelais

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Oddly enough, even in the magnificent language of Descartes, there is no term that has been recognized by the Academie Francaise to describe what the English and Americans call "a palate cleanser".

The Daniel speaks in mysterious ways.

We all know that there is *much* life and many words dehors l'Academie.

:biggrin:

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Oddly enough, even in the magnificent language of Descartes, there is no term that has been recognized by the Academie Francaise to describe what the English and Americans call "a palate cleanser".

The Daniel speaks in mysterious ways.

We all know that there is *much* life and many words dehors l'Academie.

:biggrin:

It is just odd to me that this word was used so much in the restaurants I've worked in, and it is not screaming out...

-Paul

 

Remplis ton verre vuide; Vuide ton verre plein. Je ne puis suffrir dans ta main...un verre ni vuide ni plein. ~ Rabelais

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Seriously, I think that there is such a word and that it was one of those words used in certain places during a specific period of time. An American slang version that meant "palate cleanser" but yet was in French (so to speak) but not really *from* the French language. So it might *not* be recognized as a "real" word by Francophones. That would explain why my focus went to thinking of Cajun cooking when trying to remember the word - my memory stems from restaurants of North America rather than of France.

:blink:

Sigh.

Really, this is alternately funny and terrible. :huh:

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