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Packaged Ramen


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I found Youtube and did a search on ramen. I didn't realize how many people eat those prepackage ramen's (e.g., Nissan, Top ramen). What is your Favorite package ramen? What do you add to it?

I am a fan of two. Top Ramen (shrimp flavor) and Jin Ramen (very spicey). I cook it following instructions but many times add scallions and an egg.

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My favorite brand comes from the Korean grocery...but of course I can't think of the name, and of course I'm out of it. But my favorite flavor is kimchi, followed by a flavor called "Asian onion vegetable." And of course I add extra kimchi to it!

For fun, here's some Korean instant noodle reviews.

"She would of been a good woman," The Misfit said, "if it had been somebody there to shoot her every minute of her life."

--Flannery O'Connor, "A Good Man is Hard to Find"

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shin ramen is good cooked or eaten raw with the sauce packet sprinkled over the crushed ramen. I also like the chapagetti - because I am too lazy to make chajang myun from scratch. This is a childhood fav for my sister and I. I also like the shin brand champong. Other favs include: neoguri spicy udon, nong shim brand spicy ramen (my mom buys like 20 packets of these for my sister and me -when I visit)

thanks for the webpage, It helped me remember the names of my favorite ramens!

edited to add: donbei soba (japanese) with the little brown fried thing on the top, delicious

Edited by SheenaGreena (log)
BEARS, BEETS, BATTLESTAR GALACTICA
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I love all the flavors of Nissen Ramen (shrimp, chicken, etc)...

In Korea, I like the beef stock ramen and the mild mushroom ramen soup.

In the Philippines, I love Maggie beef soup and Lucky Me Batchoy soup bowl.

Doddie aka Domestic Goddess

"Nobody loves pork more than a Filipino"

eGFoodblog: Adobo and Fried Chicken in Korea

The dark side... my own blog: A Box of Jalapenos

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My current favourite would probably be Shin Ramen. We buy boxes and ship it back here everytime we go back home.

But I have an old, old longing for the classic "Sapporo Ichiban" ramen, one of the first big brands in North America. I can still remember those TV commercials with the Japanese in cowboy hats and boots shouting "Sapporo ichiban-yo!".

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I taught acouple of high school home economics classes back in the 70s. One of the first Asian dishes I showed the students was ramen. Sapporo was the brand that was avalable in our small grocery store. Several have had them before, but the product was new to 75% of the kids. How I cooked it was new to all. :wink:

The students were from farm families, beef and potatoes. I showed them how to slice up semi frozen beef to add to the soup just before the noodles are cooked through. For vegetables, it was whole leaves of iceberg lettuce and scallion. Sesame oil was a whole new experience for these kids, as was eating this with chopsticks! I see a few of them in the city now, and they tell me this is how they still cook ramen - for their kids too!

I still prefer Sapporo original flavour as it is a good basic ingredient. When not in a hurry, and in need of quick comfort food, I add blanched Shanghai bak choy or gai lan, sliced pork or Chinese sausage, shrimp, whole stalks of scallions or cilantro, and top the steaming bowl with preserved chili radish and sesame oil

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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We buy instant ramen/other Asian instant noodles by the case and always have several kinds in the house. My 10 year old and her friends inhale the stuff, and it's good for a quick meal, especially breakfast!

My favorites are:

Myojo Duck Noodles, from Thailand. Thinner than regular ramen, and a smaller portion. The broth is heady with star anise. I always add fresh cilantro and usually add shredded cooked chicken (or duck, when I have it). I buy mine by the case at a local Southeast Asian market.

Nissin Top Ramen, Shrimp Flavor. My favorite way of preparing it is to drain off most of the liquid after cooking, then add a dash of Japanese ponzu sauce and a spoonful of peanut butter. Makes it taste like Chinese sesame noodles! I also add cooked shrimp and cilantro, as above.

Mama Tom Yum (Shrimp Flavor). A bit spicy for me, but a wonderful balanced flavor. I add shrimp and cilantro (can you tell I love cilantro?).

SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

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Despite the fact that I live in Japan my favorite ramen is the wonderfuly spicy Shin ramen followed closely by tom yum flavor from Thailand, the brand I have forgotten.

Japanese ramens don't have enough kick for me. :biggrin:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Despite the fact that I live in Japan my favorite ramen is the wonderfuly spicy Shin ramen followed closely by tom yum flavor from Thailand, the brand I have forgotten.

Japanese ramens don't have enough kick for me. :biggrin:

Nonetheless, I was very enthralled with fresh Hakata Ramen from one of the street stalls in Fukuoka. Ended up buying some Hakata Ramen for home -- along with a big stash of yuzu juices and sauces.

Like Shin Ramyeon a lot. I think I noticed a handful of new flavors at the store yesterday. Since it FREAKING SNOWED this evening, I may just start trying out these flavors to warm me up.

<a href='http://www.zenkimchi.com/FoodJournal' target='_blank'>ZenKimchi Korean Food Journal</a> - The longest running Korean food blog

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Shin, by far.

Can I put in a plug for a non-ramen instant noodle? My other staple is a Thai product: Mama Oriental Style Instant Noodle (Chand Clear Soup). They now call it "pho" on the packet though they used to call it something else. It's a simple rice noodle that's salty and very spicy, but that has a clean garlic flavor and nothing else.

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Two words: Mama Brand.

I've been eating these since I was a teenager in Bangkok way back in the mid-70's. I'm pretty partial to the artificial pork flavour, Creamy Tom Yum, and their kao soi (which bears no resemblence to regular kao soi, but are still good in their own way).

I buy them by the case at my local Asian market for $5.79/case of 30. The lady there says that Mama Brand outsells the other brands by a long shot, but "not that many farangs buy this brand."

Do most other brands also include the packet of fat to be added during the cooking?

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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many folks seem to preferr shin. I had it today for lunch and it was too spicy for me.

I had Jin ramen this weekend and that was good. I got a few (e.g., octopus Jampong ramen) that I've not yet tried. will report back.

Soup

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Do most other brands also include the packet of fat to be added during the cooking?

Myojo (Thailand) does.

Do you (SuzySushi and snowangel) mean "after the cooking"?

Well, at the end of the cooking process (which takes 3 minutes max). I usually stir in the seasonings just before I remove the pan from the heat.

SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

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Do most other brands also include the packet of fat to be added during the cooking?

Myojo (Thailand) does.

Do you (SuzySushi and snowangel) mean "after the cooking"?

Well, at the end of the cooking process (which takes 3 minutes max). I usually stir in the seasonings just before I remove the pan from the heat.

Thanks for your clarification.

I add such "fragrant oil" to a bowl of ramen as a final touch. If I remember correctly, the instructions on the package specified so. (I really don't eat much instant ramen these days.)

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I tried a ramen called Squid Ramen (ojinhau Jampong) from Nong Shim. I only tried it once but it was great. I'm definitely trying it again. If its as good as it was today, I may have a new favorite.

Soup

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Two words:  Mama Brand.

I've been eating these since I was a teenager in Bangkok way back in the mid-70's.  I'm pretty partial to the artificial pork flavour, Creamy Tom Yum, and their kao soi (which bears no resemblence to regular kao soi, but are still good in their own way).

I buy them by the case at my local Asian market for $5.79/case of 30.  The lady there says that Mama Brand outsells the other brands by a long shot, but "not that many farangs buy this brand."

Do most other brands also include the packet of fat to be added during the cooking?

Do you use the chile packet from Mama? That chile packet is enough to bring the most seasoned chile eater to tears...

We have always used the spice packet from Mama, but not the noodles. My dad hated their noodles, so we would always use better quality ones.

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Kung-fu Chicken flavor ramen! Oh man, Kung-fu makes good instant ramen. I like the smack of chix flavor (c'mon, does it merit me calling it chicken) and the shape of the noodles. I hate squishy, overcooked ramen so I usually undercook it and then dump almost all the liquid and then add the seasoning packet with a smidge of sesame oil. Breakfast of champions! :laugh:

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  • 2 weeks later...

I undercook the noodles and pour out the water. If you do this once, you'll understand why I do it. The smell and the color of the water is horrible! It's not so bad if you use the freeze-dried ones, like Koka--the others are dried using the deepfrying method, I believe.

Then I 'cook' ('cause dissolving powder in boiling water doesn't quite count as cook) and pour the soup over the noodles. I usually add a splash of sesame oil if it's chicken. Eggs are usually a great addition too.

I like Nong Shim, Koka, and Maggi. But Maggi noodles suck, especially compared to Koka.

May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

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