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Mushroom infused olive oil


Nyleve Baar
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So I have a pretty substantial amount of dried porcini mushrooms and was thinking how nice it would be to make some infused olive oil. Has anyone done this themselves? I'm worried, of course, of poisoning my family and friends (oh, and myself too) with botulism. Is there any safe way of doing this safely?

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I'd grind them to a powder and toast them in a skillet for a bit before putting them in the oil. That should kill most anything, and if it doesn't... pray make it to the keyboard before you succumb.

This whole love/hate thing would be a lot easier if it was just hate.

Bring me your finest food, stuffed with your second finest!

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Botulism will only occur if it is in a vaccuum, like really totally airtight.

Dont grind and toast, it will burn.

I have tried 4 different experiments in the past.

Nobody died either, or got sick.

1. High quality porcinis were heated in the oven till fragrant.

Transferred to a tupperware container.

Covered with room temp ex virgin oil and covered refrigerated for a week.

Moderate infusion, discernible porcini flavor.

2. The reverse.

High quality olive oil was heated till warm but not anywhere near its smoking, denature point.

Use a thermometer.

EVOO smoking point is reputed to be somewhere around 250 F.

I heated to 170F.

Pour over porcinis in tupperware, cover and refrigerate 1 week.

Much stronger porcini flavor.

Strained oil whipped into mashed potatotes for example yeilded mash that was white but had

a solid hint or porcini after taste.

Yummy.

Also used to Confit Black Cod (sable) that was brined in porcini brine....Fabulous.

3. High Tech Version.

Triple bag olive oil and porcinis in cryovac bag and hold at 65C for 6 hrs in water bath.

Remove, strain and chill in tupperware.

Amazing porcini flavor.

4. Low Tech alternative to why High Tech Works.

Hold porcinis and oil for some long period of time at requisite temp.

I now use induction cooker which hold temp perfectly.

Stove flame is too volatile and too much variance in temp.

You can get away with it with a good thermometer.

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4. Low Tech alternative to why High Tech Works.

    Hold porcinis and oil for some long period of time at requisite temp.

    I now use induction cooker which hold temp perfectly.

    Stove flame is too volatile and too much variance in temp.

    You can get away with it with a good thermometer.

What do you think about using a crock pot for your Low-Tech Version 4? And...would you pulverize the porcinis or leave them in pieces? Strain out afterward?

I've been reading all sorts of scary food safety stuff about this, which I don't usually do but honestly I don't want to kill my friends or family. At least not this way right now.

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Something else to consider is merely treasuring the porcini since they last forever as long as you keep them in a jar in a dry place until you're inspired to use them for a meal.

I prefer to soak them in boiling water, heated wine or broth and strain the liquid to incorporate into the risotto, soup, braise or sauce. Porcini powder's very good, too, of course.

There are some excellent flavored vinegars, but olive oil is something I like on its own, blended with other flavors only when marinating, cooking or dressing a salad.

"Viciousness in the kitchen.

The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

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Botulism will only occur if it is in a vaccuum, like really totally airtight.

Botulism does not require a complete vacuum, only a very low level of oxygen (as found in oils) and has been caused by garlic infused olive oils.

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Something else to consider is merely treasuring the porcini since they last forever as long as you keep them in a jar in a dry place until you're inspired to use them for a meal. 

I am only looking to do this because I have had an unbelievably bountiful porcini-picking season. Used as many as I could while fresh, froze a few and dried the rest. I have two very large jars, plus some jars of commercially dried ones that I had previously bought (unaware that I would soon come into such a windfall). Even if I make one bottle of porcini-infused oil, I will still have plenty to last me until NEXT year.

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