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Veggie Burger Recipes?


matt_smith
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Did a pretty thorough forum search, and determined a few things:

1) Many members on the board do not consider veggie burgers to be real food in any sense.

2) Many others do, and seem to have excellent ways of preparing them that I would like to try.

3) Most of those from 2) haven't posted specific recipes.

I say this only because I'm trying my hand at a variety of methods at home and have reached a point where I need some new direction. I find the sheer possibility of ingredients and options for this particular dish delightful, but I've also learned that precise amounts and directions can make the difference between veggie burger bliss and unappealing mush.

So, those of you who make, partake, or enjoy, any good recipes to share?

(Note: If you think veggie burgers are sacriledge, I both apologize and offer to take you to a great little spot called Northstar Cafe the next time you're in Columbus in an effort to prove you wrong. The Vegetarian 'Northstar' burger there is head and shoulders above all but the best burgers I've had the pleasure of eating, meat included)

:biggrin:

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Here's an excellent recipe with black beans. I've made it many times with a few tweaks:

Black Bean Patties With Cilantro and Lime

http://food.cookinglight.com/cooking/recip...ecipe_id=665259

Haven't tried this one yet, but it sounds good, and has gotten great reviews:

Carrot Burgers

http://www.recipezaar.com/149006

Edited by merstar (log)
There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.
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I remember being in your position a few months ago, searching here for good veggie burger recipes and being surprised at how intensely hated they were by some people. I used a recipe from "delicious" magazine here in Australia which with a few tweaks has served me well. Here's what I do:

Ingredients:

1 carrot

2 zucchinis

1 brown onion

1 large clove of garlic

1/4 cup coriander

3 tbs crunchy peanut butter

3 tsp curry paste

~150g wholemeal bread... a bit stale, or dry it out in a warm oven.

1 can (~400g) of chickpeas, drained

Flour

Milk

Olive oil

How to make it:

1. Dice the onion. Grate the carrot and zucchini. Sauté them all in a hot pan with a tiny bit of olive oil and some salt. The aim isn't to sweat them but make them just a little tender and colour them. About 2 minutes before they're done, mince the garlic and add that to the veggies.

2. Tear up the bread into small pieces, and whizz in a food processor to make bread crumbs. Add the curry paste, peanut butter, chick peas, coriander, a little salt and pepper, and process until combined. There's no need to process the hell out of it, you just want to combine it all evenly.

3. Combine the veggies and the processed curry/bread/chickpea mix in a bowl. Add enough milk and flour to get everything to stick together. Getting them to stay together can be a real pain... it's really just trial and error until you find the right consistency.

4. Shape into 1.5-2cm burgers, and put in the fridge for at least an hour. Putting them in the fridge will really help them stay together.

5. To cook them, fry in a hot pan with some olive oil, about 4 minutes a side. Enjoy!

The key is to keep everything as dry as possible. For the vegetables, don't be tempted to chop them in a food processor, or they'll turn to mush which is both unappealing and way too wet to handle when you're shaping the burgers. When you're sautéing the vegetables, don't pile up the pan or they'll sweat too much. Cook in batches if you need to so they all get nicely coloured and stay dry. It sounds like a lot of fussing around, but really the whole thing's not difficult to put together.

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I love veggie burgers and I just started testing a bunch of recipes to find some to get me through the winter. Last night I made the Outrageously Good Pan Crisped Millet Vegetable Cakes from Crescent Dragonwagon's Passionate Vegetarian, substituting pintos for butter beans. Very nice, although next time I'll add more garlic cloves (I used only two, versus the three to five recommended). Obviously they include the millet, plus carrot, beet, tahini, tamari, lemon juice, and s&p.

Diana Burrell, freelance writer/author

The Renegade Writer's Query Letters That Rock (Marion Street Press, Nov. 2006)

DianaCooks.com

My eGullet blog

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Though I love regular burgers, and almost always like them better than veggie burgers, I've come to find that I also really love some type of veggie burgers.

The problem with veggie burgers is that some are absolutely horrible, and they ruin it for people who never get around to trying the good ones.

Personally, I've tried making veggie burgers only twice before, and both times wasn't happy with them. They were kind of dry and starchy.

I'll keep my eye on this thread for good ideas though.

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Just found this thread:

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=15783

might be of interest regarding veggie burger "theory," though the thread is pretty short.

Edited by A Patric (log)
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I like to make risotto cakes for both vegetarians and non-vegetarians.

The variety is endless as you can start with any vegetable-based risotto. You can add an egg or not to the chilled risotto before forming the cakes, then coat them with dried bread crumbs and pan brown. They are nice to serve surrounded by a vegetable ragout or sauce. The parmigiano or other dried cheese in the risotto adds a nice savory note..

Some of my favorite combos:

tomato risotto cakes served with a sauteed mixture of zucchini, onins, carrots, etc. (for a not completely veg version you can add some pancetta to the sautee mix) Fennel is a nice vegetable to feature in the cake or accompanying vegetables also as it is a great complement to tomato.

lemon risotto cakes served with a mushroom or artichoke ragout or asparagus saute.

I've made a risotto-like dish with pearl barley as well. These might be interesting to serve in cake form also and serve with a mushroom sauce.

My mom just told me about some great potato dumplings she had in Austria that after boiling were dried, coated with finely ground almonds and pan browned. I'm thinking these could be interesting as a main course "veggie burger" if they were made a little bigger and served with an appropriate sauce/veg saute. This is moving into "croguette" territory but perhaps suggests another approach toward a veggie burger type entree.

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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I like to make risotto cakes for both vegetarians and non-vegetarians.

The variety is endless as you can start with any vegetable-based risotto.  You can add an egg or not to the chilled risotto before forming the cakes, then coat them with dried bread crumbs and pan brown.  They are nice to serve surrounded by a vegetable ragout or sauce.  The parmigiano or other dried cheese in the risotto adds a nice savory note..

Some of my favorite combos:

tomato risotto cakes served with a sauteed mixture of zucchini, onins, carrots, etc.  (for a not completely veg version you can add some pancetta to the sautee mix)  Fennel is a nice vegetable to feature in the cake or accompanying vegetables also as it is a great complement to tomato.

lemon risotto cakes served with a mushroom or artichoke ragout or asparagus saute.

I've made a risotto-like dish with pearl barley as well.  These might be interesting to serve in cake form also and serve with a mushroom sauce.

My mom just told me about some great potato dumplings she had in Austria that after boiling were dried, coated with finely ground almonds and pan browned.  I'm thinking these could be interesting as a main course "veggie burger" if they were made a little bigger and served with an appropriate sauce/veg saute.  This is moving into "croguette" territory but perhaps suggests another approach toward a veggie burger type entree.

I've done risotto with portobello mushrooms; your version(s) sound great! And then there's the falafel route...[Homer Simpson] Ummmmmm....falafel.....[/Homer Simpson]

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--but back to veggie burgers--I'd love to get my hands on the recipe for the "Northstar Burger." What's on it?

heh. so would i, believe me. i've bugged the staff there as much as possible about it, but i've only been able to pry out a handful of ingredients and part of the technique. they're remarkably tight-lipped about it.

i can tell from eating it that it's based on rice, beets, and black beans (i think). i also know that it contains chipotle peppers. and i know that they mash the mix into a form to create the "patty," a procedure that might result in it sticking together quite a bit better than most homemade veggie burgers i've had. it has only the slightest mushy quality to it.

more info and some backup for my sweeping assertions here,

here, (scroll down), and the official cafe site (spare though it may be) is here.

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  • 1 year later...

"Bump"

Diana came home from camp a vegetarian (eggs and fish are OK), but really likes veggie burgers, so share some new ideas. BTW, neither she nor I like cooked root crops (no beets or carrots need apply). Something that could be frozen would be great, and she does like spicy.

I've got things mostly covered, but the ability to slap something on the grill for her when we want burgers, steak or (chicken) thighs would be most helpful. The purchased ones are at most mediocre, and really expensive.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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I've never made veggie burgers myself, but went meatless one Lent in college and shared some with veggie friends (who had frozen patties in their freezer from their mom - she kept the recipe secret :sad: , but was more than willing to send extras for me :biggrin: ). That particular Lent was during my college basketball team's run to the Final Four, so I spent a lot of nights in the campus sports bar. They just had a grilled portabello cap burger as a veggie option, and it's become my go to grilling substitute. They also influenced my taste in veggie burgers, so I now I like mushroom-and-rice-based burgers. I like the idea of the beet-based recipes above. I might try those this weekend.

"Life is a combination of magic and pasta." - Frederico Fellini

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  • 7 years later...

It might be time to resurrect this topic seeing as its last post was in 2008. 

We've never been a fan of 'veggie burgers' and although I don't really know why...the very word 'veggie' sets my teeth on edge.  Still this year, while doing the rounds in our local Costco, we were given a veggie burger sample.  Yum.  A surprised 'yum'.  Bought a box.  Ate them.  Bought another box.  And ate them also.  Looked for another box.  What's that you say?  They're a 'seasonal' item and they don't have them in the fall.  Rats.  Now I have to find a decent recipe. 

 

I kept the ingredient list...although now I can't find it in that place called 'My Den'.  Double rats.

 

Any more good veggie burger recipes out there?  Please.  (I will try some of the above ones so thank you backwards.)

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Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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LOL "teeth on edge" that about describes it LOL! I feel the same way with "gluten free" Immediate distain and my teeth go on edge!! But in this case I like veg burgers  a lot and  I have several good recipes …when I find them I will post….. but i think if you think of it more like a type of  falafel  instead of burger?? ..I Love hamburgers and veggie burgers but I would never eat one as the other… I like things like feta  roasted peppers olives  sour cream and cucumbers on veggie burgers and the usual stuff on hamburgers …it of its own a "veggie burger" per se is really deliscious..if/when you do not think of it as a fake burgers just another "thing" to compile season and eat on a bun! If I can find my top recipe from the old Kathy's Kitchen on PBS I used make them once a year because they  are a lot of work.. but  make a huge batch and freeze/reheated perfectly they were my first veggie burger the kids would eat and they loved it would even take them for lunch …I can post it ..but first i have to find it and now that i think about it I really would like to make a batch! 

 

if anyone has this recipe before I find it and post it Kathy's recipe ruled 

 

 

 "Worth the effort Veggie burgers " by Kathy Hoshijo  

 

also the "raw vegan burger" that is all over the net is really good  as well I do not have it handy I just made it several times and got sick of it to be honest ..super easy though 

  • Like 1
why am I always at the bottom and why is everything so high? 

why must there be so little me and so much sky?

Piglet 

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The best one I've ever had -- I still remember it from years ago -- was the Eden Burger from The Frog/Commissary Cookbook, originally published in 1985. Here's the recipe, slightly adapted by the site's author (2T olive oil instead of the book's ¼ cup corn oil; portabello mushrooms instead of "regular" ones; optional 1 egg, if vegan isn't necessaary).

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"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

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I found the book …awww old friend ..hug hug …nostalgic and teary ….good times …the show was awful! she was so bad but she put out two very good cookbooks and put her heart and soul in both …very "early 80's vegetarian" 

with a strong Asian Pacific Island influence..and she was always a yogi so she has that very sweet vibe 

 

 the book the "Art of Dieting Without Dieting " by Kathy Hishijo (she followed a yogic diet) it is all about healthy eating not "dieting " I think that is what they told her to call it back then to sell it ….

 

the recipe is "Worth The Trouble Burgers" and they are and if you are careful follow the recipe exactly .. they are damn good…just NOT a hamburger ..but a good thing to slam in a bun and condiment with the "usuals" …(if violates something if you just snap a shot of a page out of a cookbook I think or i would  it is long complex and has little pointer boxes ) 

 

 

I will try to make them next week and copy the recipe then . 

  • Like 3
why am I always at the bottom and why is everything so high? 

why must there be so little me and so much sky?

Piglet 

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OK.  So after fiddling around a bit online, I finally found the recipe for Hoshijo's burgers, and one thing for sure...they are a lot of trouble.  I'd have to buy a few things first. 

For anyone who can't wait until HBK posts the recipe.  (I'm not always a good waiting person if I can figure out a way to do it myself.  But thanks so much anyway. :wub: )

 

http://www.atkinsdietbulletinboard.com/forums/atkins-food-cooking-chat/34840-help-me-modify-recipe-low-carb.html

  • Like 1

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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We really enjoyed these mushroom burgers from Fine Cooking:

http://www.finecooking.com/recipes/umami-bomb-mushroom-burgers.aspx

 

(May require subscription to view, sorry).

 

The article that featured the mushroom recipe also had a very tasty Thai Peanut Tofu burger that was too spicy for my kid. As some of the reviews note, both of these burgers are a bit hard to keep together in the pan-- they definitely would not work on the grill. For the tofu "burger" I fried the leftovers as crumbles and served them on salad-- very good.

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