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Qui

The Best Way to Cut Cake Slices

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hi all,

What is the best way to cut cake slices like Opera. I guess what I'm looking for is to get a clean cut without having the layers looked like it has been smooched and chocolate/ganache bleeding into buttercream - sloppy looking.

I've tried leaving the cake out at room temperature, then cut it with a warm knife - didn't really work.

Thanks for your help!

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hot water and a hot clean knife. Between slices, clean the knife and slip it down into very hot water.. works like a charm.

This works very well if you have an automatic hot water heater. Just another reason to get one of these most wonderful gadjets...they do a heck of a job with drip coffe and tea is instant! If you're handy you can get them for less than 300 bucks or so at the big box shops.

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Also, cakes usually cut much better when they are cool or even frozen, depending on the type of cake, because that minimizes the difference in firmness between layers. Thin knives are better than thicker knives. And you knife should be as sharp as possible.


"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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Just to clarify . . . yes, hot water & clean knife. But, after wiping your blade clean from the previous slice and dipping in hot water, wipe it again before the next slice. No need to drip water and get your cake soggy.


So long and thanks for all the fish.

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Just to clarify . . . yes, hot water & clean knife.  But, after wiping your blade clean from the previous slice and dipping in hot water, wipe it again before the next slice.  No need to drip water and get your cake soggy.

and yes, you know not to drip on your cake, right?

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Also, cakes usually cut much better when they are cool or even frozen, depending on the type of cake, because that minimizes the difference in firmness between layers. Thin knives are better than thicker knives. And you knife should be as sharp as possible.

This raises one of those questions I've wondered about. What are the "rules" on freezing various fillings/frostings/icings? Having been surprised at how well some things freeze, there is clearly stuff I am missing. What can you freeze and what just dies when you do that?

Patrick (or one of the many other sages here), care to enlighten me?

thx

~km

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Thanks for the input.

One more question, when I cut the slices, should I push the knife down or pull it towards me? I was told that pulling towards me would slice better, is that true?

so, for a cake like opera, with buttercream and ganache, is it still better to slice them cool? how about butter cakes? like a devil's layer cake, where the cake gets pretty firm when it's chilled, it wouldn't be too difficult to cut when cool?

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Thanks for the input.

One more question, when I cut the slices, should I push the knife down or pull it towards me? I was told that pulling towards me would slice better, is that true?

so, for a cake like opera, with buttercream and ganache, is it still better to slice them cool? how about butter cakes? like a devil's layer cake, where the cake gets pretty firm when it's chilled, it wouldn't be too difficult to cut when cool?

Slice straight down. pull out and clean. warm again and slice. sliced cool is good. almost frozen is better. Sharp knife, thin knife, hot knife, clean knife between slices. That is it. Now, go and be good.

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Also, cakes usually cut much better when they are cool or even frozen, depending on the type of cake, because that minimizes the difference in firmness between layers. Thin knives are better than thicker knives. And you knife should be as sharp as possible.

This raises one of those questions I've wondered about. What are the "rules" on freezing various fillings/frostings/icings? Having been surprised at how well some things freeze, there is clearly stuff I am missing. What can you freeze and what just dies when you do that?

Patrick (or one of the many other sages here), care to enlighten me?

thx

~km

To be honest I can only recall a few problems from freezing things. I've had Herme's chocolate glaze crack on me once when I froze it on a cake. But the vast majority of things I've frozen -- including a lot of different kinds of mousses and buttercreams-- have frozen just fine.


"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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it also depends on how "frozen" you take things; a home freezer will not be as cold, or as drying, as a commercial one.

To cut opera, in addition to the directions above, you might want to cut in strips first, then crosswise. We used to assemble and freeze, then do long strips, return all but one to the freezer, then take crosswise cuts. For ala carte service, we would keep the cut surfaces together to keep them from drying out.

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Here is the problem: we have this wonderful cake, but no idea how to cut it so as to get nice slices. Is there a special technique?


"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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1. have a tall container full of very hot water (tall enough that the entire blade of your knife will fit into it) standing by.

2. warm your knife in the hot water

3. dry the knife on a clean towel

4. make a slice in the cake

5. repeat steps 2 through 4 until all the pieces are cut

* if you're uncomfortable cutting the slices free hand, mark the top of the cake lightly with the knife before you actually slice down...still cleaning the knife between marks so that you don't mess up the icing

* if there's meringue (as in a crunchy meringue layer) in the cake, all bets are off as you'll need a serrated knife and you'll have to do a bit of sawing to get through the meringue layer

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Some people use unflavored dental floss to cut cake. I've tried it that way but I do it the Alana way. And you want a thinner blade on the knife.

Or

You can just slash it up and then slather it with ice cream & no one will be the wiser. :biggrin:


Edited by K8memphis (log)

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Also, depending on the type of cake and how long before serving you need/want to slice it, you may want to refrigerate or even freeze it first. Some types of cakes/frostings/etc will cut much cleaner when cold.


"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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Everything Alana said is what I would suggest.

What kind of cake is it? That could make a difference.

The cake is made with carmellized(sp?) nuts. That is what is making it difficult to slice. And please feel free to tell me how "that" word is spelled :rolleyes:


"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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caramelized

so now we know with those nuts, all bets are off. :biggrin:

what kind of nut? whole walnuts? pecans? chopped peanuts as in brittle? Are they on the surface? Inside? On the sides? If they're only on the sides, you are mostly in the clear.

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I always give an instruction sheet taped to the box when I have a cake delivered to a client.

In addition to the clean knife technique, I suggest cutting a small circle in the center of the

cake, then cut the slices from the "outer ring", if you will. This makes for foolproof, equal size slices that are neither too big or too small, and keeps everything nice and neat. You also don't waste

cake, there's plenty for everyone, too!

Does that make sense?


www.onetoughcookienyc.com

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ok gang! here is an indepth discription of my problem: The cake topping is made with pecans, brown sugar, butter and whipped cream. The cake is cooked up-side-down so everything cooks to a praline-type coat. The cake is wonderful, at least it would be if anyone could cut it. I hope this info helps :unsure:


Edited by Naftal (log)

"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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damn, that sounds good.

I assume you unmold it while it is still warm? and the topping still somewhat soft? slice through the praline at that point (but not the cake)...somewhat in the style of a dobos torte...

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Throw out my instructions for this cake and just dig in!

:wub:


www.onetoughcookienyc.com

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Add some corn syrup or more cream to the topping so it does not cook up so hard... or maybe make individuals to completely sidestep the cutting thing! Honestly, caramelized nuts will never cut cleanly unless they are chopped up finely; if they are in a pretty solid topping you'll always make a mess because it is so much harder than the cake beneath.

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can you cut it upside down (flip it so the topping is on the plate and you are cutting down through the cake, and can put some body english into the final cut through the praline) Then you can scoop it all up when you put the piece right side up?)

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