Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Sign in to follow this  
Simon Patrice

"Au Pied de Cochon"...the book

Recommended Posts

I am soooo bummed.. the site to order the book only ships to canada and the US!

I will email them directly instead of trying to order online!

I WANT THIS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Picard's cooking, book and general attitude towards life is a breath of fresh air. He is as serious about his food as any chef with a high profile but retains an irreverance and lust for life that is refreshing.

So far we have made the PDC Poutine and 'Duck in a Can'. A veal demi-glace was used for the Poutine sauce and a duck stock for the 'Duck in a Can' . Fresh Grade C Hudson Valley foie gras was used in both dishes. Both dishes are hearty, rich and satisfying, not some itsy bitsy esoteric conglomeration of ingrediants that tries to pass for cooking these day.

The DVD is great, continuning the irreverance of the book.

I have to stop typing now and have my arteries checked.-Dick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I am soooo bummed.. the site to order the book only ships to canada and the US!

I will email them directly instead of trying to order online!

I WANT THIS

divina, The Cookbook Store in Toronto is now carrying Au Pied de Cauchon (I bought it at the restaurant a couple of weeks ago; it IS amazing, as is the restaurant!).

Here's a link to The Cookbook Store http://www.cook-book.com/media/index.html#top

I'm sure they'll mail it anywhere.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I am soooo bummed.. the site to order the book only ships to canada and the US!

I will email them directly instead of trying to order online!

I WANT THIS

divina, The Cookbook Store in Toronto is now carrying Au Pied de Cauchon (I bought it at the restaurant a couple of weeks ago; it IS amazing, as is the restaurant!).

Here's a link to The Cookbook Store http://www.cook-book.com/media/index.html#top

I'm sure they'll mail it anywhere.

So will Archambault. For $15 cheaper too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FYI, it's backordered at Archambault. My order's been in since late November. I emailed them the other day asking about an expected date of restocking, but haven't yet heard back. If I hear from them, I'll post the reply here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I heard back from Archambault. They're expecting a new shipment from their supplier in 2 - 3 weeks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The French version is still in stock, however (and comes with the comic book).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I ordered a copy from the Archambault site about 2 weeks ago and received the book here in California last Thursday! It's quite an amazing book. I haven't watched the DVD yet though. I don't think my vegan daughter would quite appreciate the artwork & photos though!

Margy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got my copy yesterday and love it! The DVD is really cool, especially the recipe section. I wish they could make a cooking show like that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just received mine today. Really an amazing package. I'm going to watch the dvd tonight and try some of the recipes this weekend if I can get my hands on some good venison or foie gras.

My book came from archambault.ca so I assume they are back in stock.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I see from this link, Florida Film, Food, and Wine Celebration, that Picard is in the States promoting the book.

Does anyone know his itinerary?

Also I now see the book listed on Border's and Amazon's websites. However, when I click through the details page, it says the book is currently unavailable.


Edited by rcianci (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I ordered my copy from the restaurant over 2 months ago, but I still haven't received it.....surely it doesn't take that long for packages to get from Canada to Australia.

However, before I send them an e-mail to chase up on the order, I need a question answered. I took a look at the website again....does the book come in a wooden box?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Daniel, take a peek at the Porky Books in the UK thread on the UK/Ireland site

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I ordered my copy from the restaurant over 2 months ago, but I still haven't received it.....surely it doesn't take that long for packages to get from Canada to Australia. 

However, before I send them an e-mail to chase up on the order, I need a question answered.  I took a look at the website again....does the book come in a wooden box?

No that's just the cover :biggrin:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm torn over buying the French version for the band desinee, or the English version for Bourdain's intro.

Does anyone know if they swear creatively in the comic? That'd tilt the balance in favour of the French.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Daniel, take a peek at the Porky Books in the UK thread on the UK/Ireland site

5 months from Canada to the UK? How long will it take from Canada to Australia then.....I guess I might get my book in time for Christmas. :hmmm:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I ordered my copy from the restaurant over 2 months ago, but I still haven't received it.....surely it doesn't take that long for packages to get from Canada to Australia. 

However, before I send them an e-mail to chase up on the order, I need a question answered.  I took a look at the website again....does the book come in a wooden box?

No that's just the cover :biggrin:

Ah ha! Well, at least I know Australian customs won't destroy or fumigate the book then (we've got some strict laws on the importation of wood products).

Thanks for answering my question.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any more reviews from the owners of this book? I took a look at this book at Chapters but they were all wrapped in plastic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Any more reviews from the owners of this book? I took a look at this book at Chapters but they were all wrapped in plastic.

I bought the English edition weeks ago, but have barely had time to thumb through it. The recipes are fun (their mashed potatoes call for fresh cheese curds :laugh: ) and there are plenty of fun little stories.

They have a great attitude about the food they prepare, respecting the animals in particular. Visits to farms, witness to the slaughter, all of that. I know that some people are grossed out by images of animals being dressed/gutted, but there's a measure of respect given to the the beasts that provide the meat we enjoy. And I don't mean to imply that the book is grim. There's more joy here than anything. They also make an informed and passionate case for humane treatment of livestock. One of the first sections of the book is entitled "Happy Pig". Fun people, great attitude. I'd love to eat at their restaurant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Edsel, I am picking up a copy tommorow. I am curious about the canned duck that Bordain ate at the restaurant and Picard's foie gras Zampone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a seriously beautiful, artistic and unique work. Anyone in the states or internationally looked at it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a little late on the scene - my copy arrived last week and even with the crappy exchange rate with the USD, it's worth every loonie! It's a fun book with interesting recipes that I've never seen anywhere else. I'm quite anxious to get my pig trotter action going! I can only imagine the amount of foie gras and pork I will "have" to consume in my pursuit of a broader culinary repertoire.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By boilsover
      Solid intermediate cook, here.  Not especially intimidated by elaborate preps.  But I'm new to SV, and would like a recommendation for a cookbook for guidance and exploration.
       
      I was thinking of Tom Keller's Under Pressure, but I'm wondering if the preps he includes may not be the most generally useful.  What do you all like, and why?
       
      Thanks!
    • By Chris Hennes
      On Nov. 7, 2017, Modernist Bread will finally arrive on my doorstep. Having preordered it literally the first day it was available, to say I'm excited about this book is a bit of an understatement. The team at The Cooking Lab have been gracious enough to give @Dave the Cook and me early electronic access to the book and so I've spent the last week pouring over it. I'm just going to start with a few initial comments here (it's 2600 pages long, so a full review is going to take some time, and require a bunch of baking!). Dave and I would also be happy to answer any questions you've got.
       
      One of the main things I've noticed about this book is a change in tone from the original Modernist Cuisine. It comes across as less "everything you know is wrong" and more "eighty bazillion other bakers have contributed to this knowledge and here's our synthesis of it." I don't think it's an exaggeration to say that Myhrvold and company are now the most experienced bread-bakers in the world. Not necessarily in terms of the number of identical loaves they've produced, but in the shear number of different recipes and techniques they've tried and the care with which they've analyzed the results. These volumes are a distillation of 100,000 years of human breadmaking experience, topped off with a dose of the Modernist ethos of taking what we know to the next level.
       
      The recipes include weight, volume, and baker's percentages, and almost all of them can be made by both a home baker and someone baking in a commercial facility. The home baker might need to compromise on shape (e.g. you can't fit a full-length baguette in most home ovens) but the book provides clear instructions for both the amateur and professional. The recipes are almost entirely concentrated in volumes 4 and 5, with very few in the other volumes (in contrast to Modernist Cuisine, where there were many recipes scattered throughout). I can't wait for the physical volumes to arrive so that I can have multiple volumes open at once, the recipes cross-reference techniques taught earlier quite frequently.
    • By Chris Hennes
      I just got a copy of Grace Young's "Stir-Frying to the Sky's Edge"—I enjoyed cooking from "Breath of a Wok" and wanted to continue on that path. Does anyone else have this book? Have you cooked anything from it?

      Here was dinner tonight:

      Spicy Dry-Fried Beef (p. 70)

      I undercooked the beef just a bit due to a waning propane supply (I use an outdoor propane-powered wok burner), but there's nothing to complain about here. It's a relatively mild dish that lets the flavors of the ingredients (and the wok) speak. Overall I liked it, at will probably make it again (hopefully with a full tank of gas).


    • By CanadianSportsman
      Greetings,

      I've cooked several recipes from Keller's "Bouchon" the last couple of weeks, and have loved them all! At the moment (as in right this minute) I'm making the boeuf Bourguignon, and am a little confused about the red wine reduction. After reducing the wine, herbs, and veg for nearly an hour now, I'm nowhere near the consistancy of a glaze that Keller specifies. In fact, it looks mostly like the veg is on the receiving end of most of it. Is this how the recipe is meant to be? Can anybody tell me what kind of yield is expected? Any help would be appreciated. Thank you, kindly. 
    • By Paul Fink
      This unfortunately titled book changed my life. I always enjoyed cooking and idealized Julia Child &
      Jacque Pepin. But I was a typical home cook. I would see a recipe and try to duplicate it little understanding about what I was doing.
       
      Cooking the Nouvelle Cuisine in America talked about a philosophy of cooking. It showed me that there is more depth to cooking. A history. A philosophy.
      The recipes are very approachable and you can make them on a budget from grocery store ingredients. I read it as a grad student in Oregon, in the late 80's I had access to lots of fresh ingredients. And some very nice wines, cheap! I was suppose to be studying physics but I end up learning more about wine & cooking.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×