Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

eG Foodblog: MarketStEl - Today in History


MarketStEl
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hello again Sandy,

Here is my promised birthday gift of some food history. I had real trouble deciding what to choose for you, not knowing you personally.

You didn’t include Timothy Leary (1920) in your list of people who share your birthday, in spite of a tenuous food connection in his use of what he called “sacramental vegetables” in order to “turn on, tune in, and drop out” (supposedly in the form of “Leary biscuits”) – but perhaps this is a little too tenuous, not to mention illegal.

How about Sarah Bernhardt? She also shares your birthday (1844), and had several dishes named after her (a common compliment paid to female artistes at the time). I have not had chance to chase up the provenance of “Sarah Bernhardt Cake”, but there are lots of recipes online. You could have a whole meal of Sarah Bernhardt dishes – soup, sole, soufflé, and the cake – not to mention a garnish of foie-gras, and probably a potato dish.

You do mention John-Paul Sartre, and I am sure you have read “his” cookbook, which is a giggle. If you haven’t, it is <a href = "http://www-berkeley.ansys.com/wayne/sartre-cookbook.html" >HERE</a>

As for other food history factoids – as you have many global friends celebrating your birthday with you via eGullet, I thought I would give you this banquet story, as it involves international co-operation. It’s probably too late to give it to your friends to inspire them for your birthday dinner, but here it is, taken from a newspaper of the time. The dinner took place on October 22, 1913, in Berlin.

One of the most remarkable dinners ever served in Berlin was given at Imperial Automobile Club … when the foreign Military Attachés entertained in honor of the German officers who were attached to them in the recent Kaiser manoevres in Silesia.

One of the features of the dinner was a brace of turkeys imported from New England for the occasion by Major George Taylor Langhorne, the American attaché. Each attaché supplied the culinary specialty of his own country. … roasted at the club for Major Langhorne under the personal supervision of American women, who also supplied home-made cranberry jelly and the usual stuffing for the birds.

The company of international warriors and the four Germans who were at the table voted Major Langhorne’s contribution not only the most substantial item on the ample menu, but the most toothsome as well.

Other attachés supplied the following delicacies: Russia, red Siberian caviar; Japan, fish à la Nagasaki; Italy, ham; Belgium, ham; Austria, rice and Tokay; Spain, Malaga and Sherry; Bulgaria, yoghurt and milk; Brazil, cigars and preserved fruits; Turkey, nougat and candies; France, champagne; England, plum pudding.

The guests at the dinner report that each and all of them have survived without medical assistance.

Not a bad menu? Thank Goodness someone supplied the wine.

Keep on having a good birthday.

Janet

Happy Feasting

Janet (a.k.a The Old Foodie)

My Blog "The Old Foodie" gives you a short food history story each weekday day, always with a historic recipe, and sometimes a historic menu.

My email address is: theoldfoodie@fastmail.fm

Anything is bearable if you can make a story out of it. N. Scott Momaday

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Actually, Janet, Miss Bernhardt and I don't share birthdays--check the upcoming almanac entry for today.

But I did want to say "Thank You" to everyone for the birthday wishes before officially kicking off Day 2 of the blog. If I haven't responded to your PM yet, be patient--I'll get to it.

And without further ado...

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Actually, Janet, Miss Bernhardt and I don't share birthdays--check the upcoming almanac entry for today.

But I did want to say "Thank You" to everyone for the birthday wishes before officially kicking off Day 2 of the blog.  If I haven't responded to your PM yet, be patient--I'll get to it.

And without further ado...

OOPS! thats what I get for rushing to get your birthday present to you in time.

Instead, here is an entry from Samuel Pepys for the day (which I did check!).

Oct 22 1660 “…. After that to dinner at home upon some ribbs of roast beef from the Cooks (which of late we have been forced to do because of our house being always under the painters’ and other people’s hands, that we could not dress it ourselfs…”

Janet.

Happy Feasting

Janet (a.k.a The Old Foodie)

My Blog "The Old Foodie" gives you a short food history story each weekday day, always with a historic recipe, and sometimes a historic menu.

My email address is: theoldfoodie@fastmail.fm

Anything is bearable if you can make a story out of it. N. Scott Momaday

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good morning, everyone!

Today is Monday, October 23d, the 296th day of 2006. There are 69 days left in the year.

Today's Philadelphia forecast: Partly to mostly cloudy, breezy and cooler than normal. Forecast high 55F. Low tonight 37F.

On this day...

In 1086, the army of Yusuf ibn Tashfin defeated the forces of Castilian King Alfonso VI at the Battle of az-Zaqallah.

In 1790, the first of what would prove to be a series of slave uprisings began in the French colony of Haiti. Though this revolt was soon suppressed, the revolts would ultimately produce the first black-ruled republic in the Western Hemisphere in 1803.

In 1855, Free State forces in Kansas set up their own government and constitution in Topeka to counter the fraudulently elected pro-slavery state government under the Lecompton Constitution, thus launching the era of internal strife that gave the territory the nickname "Bleeding Kansas."

In 1864, Union forces led by Gen. Samuel R. Curtis defeated Gen. Sterling Price's Confederate troops at the Battle of Westport near (now in) Kansas City.

In 1915, some 30,000 women marched up Fifth Avenue in New York City to demand the right to vote.

In 1956, the Hungarian people began their uprising against a decade of Soviet domination, which eventually produced a brutal Soviet invasion on November 4. The event would be commemorated in 1989 with the formal declaration of the Republic of Hungary, bringing an end to the country's years as a Soviet satellite.

In 2000, young Ansche Hedgepeth was arrested and handcuffed for eating French fries on the Washington Metro. She was sentenced to perform community service and undergo counseling after being released to her mother.

Famous people born on this day include:

Pierre Athanase Larousse, French lexicographer, in 1817 in Toucy, France.

Sarah Bernhardt, actress, in 1844 in Paris.

Ned Rorem, gay American composer, in 1923 in Richmond, Indiana.

Johnny Carson, late-night talk-show king, in 1925 in Corning, Iowa.

Edson Arantes do Nascimento, better known as Pele, Brazilian football superstar, in 1940 in Tres Coracoes, Brazil.

Very funny people of questionable fame born on this day include:

Alfred Matthew "Weird Al" Yankovic, American song parodist, in 1959 in Lynwood, California.

Edited by MarketStEl (log)

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's what's on my agenda for today:

I have to head up to the Criminal Justice Center in a few minutes. I'm serving on a jury in a small-potatoes armed robbery case, and we begin deliberations today. This also means that I won't be able to show you some of what I eat today, for cameras are forbidden inside the courthouse.

Depending on when we wrap up our deliberations--I don't anticipate this taking us more than one day--I will fill you in on last night's dinner and this morning's breakfast routine either this afternoon or this evening.

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sandy, never having been to Philadelphia, I want to ask about the demographics. Is it all as multi-ethnic as your gayborhood seems to be? There's an impressive cross-section of Americans pictured so far.

Nice butcher shop too!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Pinchot" in the headline refers to Governor Gifford Pinchot ®, who ran Pennsylvania for two non-consecutive terms in the late 1920s and early 1930s

interesting! i thought it was referring to bronson pinchot.

The "AOB" in the sign announcing the beer special stands for "America's Oldest Brewery." D.G. Yuengling and Son of Pottsville, Schuylkill County, was founded in 1829, and the Yuenglings currently running the brewery are the fifth generation of family brewers.  Yuengling Lager is one of the many joys of living in eastern Pennsylvania--a beer with real body and craft-brewed character at a mass-market price.  (Those who prefer the watery stuff can drink Bud Light for the same price on game days.)

unfortunately yuengling stopped making their best beer (chesterfield ale) available on tap, which is a real loss for those of us who don't like our beer as sweet as the lager is. on the bright side they still make it in cans, so you can find it in my fridge at any given time...

Edited by mrbigjas (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's what's on my agenda for today:

I have to head up to the Criminal Justice Center in a few minutes. I'm serving on a jury in a small-potatoes armed robbery case, and we begin deliberations today.  This also means that I won't be able to show you some of what I eat today, for cameras are forbidden inside the courthouse.

Depending on when we wrap up our deliberations--I don't anticipate this taking us more than one day--I will fill you in on last night's dinner and this morning's breakfast routine either this afternoon or this evening.

Boy, did I blow that prediction!

We will continue our deliberations tomorrow. As I am the jury foreperson, I can't comment on the case beyond saying that we have a Twelve Angry Men-type situation. (Well, actually, it's six men and six women, eight blacks and four whites, with the races evenly balanced by gender too.)

In the meantime, I have a board meeting of Forty Plus of Philadelphia to attend in five minutes, so I won't have time to post right now. I'll probably be up late tonight again, catching up on my resume work and keeping you all up to date.

Right now, about two pounds of ground beef and a pound of Italian sausage are in the fridge, awaiting meatloafication. That's another thing to work on when I return.

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Happy B-day. Your still just a kid . Not that it changes much but the last 4 sec. of the Eagles game was decided by a 62 yd. field goal not a pass play, one way or another it was still a real heart breaker and shocking loss to their fans. the best of all was Donovan McNabb puking up like he did in the Super Bowl, I think they should try to use that in a Campbell soup commercial.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

gallery_28660_3771_88404.jpg

These days, clumps of people hanging outside the entrances to gay bars are a common sight.  These people are smoking, something they can no longer do inside since a citywide ban on smoking in public accommodations went into effect three weeks ago.

This just made me laugh, because the description sounds like one from a super-cool modern textbook of sociology or something. :biggrin:

But here in Montreal, we have had indoor/public space smoking restrictions as well. And street smoking is very much a sign of our times.

"The cure for anything is salt water: sweat, tears, or the ocean."

--Isak Dinesen

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Right now, about two pounds of ground beef and a pound of Italian sausage are in the fridge, awaiting meatloafication.  That's another thing to work on when I return.

Okay, but just remember:

"Don't let your meat loaf (heh heh heh)"

-- Frank Zappa, "The Blue Light"

:laugh:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:wub: Ohh, cheesesteaks and hogies! bring them on!

funny about weird Al being born today, have you caught his latest? It's "Trying to Catch me white and nerdy." Very funny stuff, he's not lost his touch. You can catch the video at yahoo.

So, what do you put in your meatloaf? My nephew swears by a touch of brown sugar, it makes the loaf taste like there's a little ham in there. It works.

Edited by christine007 (log)

---------------------------------------

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sandy, never having been to Philadelphia, I want to ask about the demographics.  Is it all as multi-ethnic as your gayborhood seems to be?  There's an impressive cross-section of Americans pictured so far.

Nice butcher shop too!

Philadelphia is a good deal more multiethnic now than it was when I moved here from Boston nearly a quarter century ago.

Blacks (about 40 percent of the city's population in 2000) and non-Hispanic whites (a bare majority) are still the two largest groups in town, but the denizens of our compact Chinatown--which I swung through in my first foodblog--have been joined by more recent waves of immigrants from Southeast Asia, especially Vietnam; from Korea; from all over the Americas, in particular Mexico and Brazil, and from Africa proper, especially North and West Africa and Ethiopia. These new Philadelphians have transformed the face of the city's Northeast, the great post-World War II Auto Age suburb, and breathed new life into struggling neighborhoods in North, West and South Philly. Given that their numbers are still relatively small--I don't have the figures handy, but I'd estimate that recent immigrants still account for no more than 10 percent of the city's population--they have had a tremendous impact on the face--and foodways--of the City of Brotherly Love.

Speaking of "brotherly love," the "Gayborhood" itself--the northwest quarter of Washington Square West--is IMO not as diverse ethnically as some other parts of the city; though it attracts well-off gay men of just about all races as residents, and there is low-income housing scattered throughout the district, it is still predominantly white; however, the presence of many students in the neighborhood keeps it from being as uniformly upper-middle-class as Society Hill to its east.

You may have seen others besides myself on this board use a quip of mine about how Philadelphia is really "a small town masquerading as a big city." I think the everyone-knows-everyone-else intimacy of so many of the city's neighborhoods--the Gayborhood no exception--is actually one of the things that makes this city such a pleasant place to live. Not all agree with me, though.

Edited by MarketStEl (log)

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So here it is, Tuesday already, and I still haven't finished chronicling my birthday. Kinda reminds me of my previous blog. So while I take a break from working on a resume, and having cleaned up after Monday night's dinner--which will probably be posted here tomorrow night at the rate I'm going--let me get to the high point of my birthday.

gallery_28660_3771_4869.jpg

This is Vince Ancona, the fellow second tenor I mentioned upthread, standing in the doorway of my kitchen. He works for a direct marketing firm here in the city, but that's only a means to a paycheck. His real passions are artistic--poetry, music and preparing fabulous meals. (He was supposed to give me a URL for his personal web site so you all could sample some of his work. He forgot to leave me the URL, leaving instead the shirt he's wearing here. :hmmm: )

For my birthday, he gave me the gift of a simple but delicious dinner. He also brought along a mutual friend who will also join us in the PGMC next year (God willing), James Dorn:

gallery_28660_3771_14208.jpg

James is back in town after spending a year or two in Nashville, where he pursued a dream of making it in Christian music with only limited success. It's great to have him back here.

While my partner Gary gave him a good going-over about his personal history and ours, I set out the appetizers:

gallery_28660_3771_62815.jpg

Vince brought down the Kaukauna Cheddar Ranch cheese ball and the mini-Camembert. You will recall that I picked up the Cantalet earlier on Sunday, and I had had the Cabot horseradish Cheddar in my fridge, waiting for no occasion in particular. Vince also made a very tasty homemade cheese spread from Neufchatel and sliced almonds with a hint of cayenne, which is in the crock in the photo below.

gallery_28660_3771_58385.jpg

and fed them to Vince while he got to work on dinner. He is something of a Francophile, culinarily speaking, and explained to me that the inspiration for this menu came from here:

gallery_28660_3771_8771.jpg

While he was making the -- what should I call these? Crostini is Italian, and "gratin," which he used to refer to them, properly refers to the topping and not the bread it tops; pain au gratin, perhaps? -- I fed him from the cheese platter. (We both liked all of the cheeses served, but he absolutely raved about the horseradish Cheddar.)

gallery_28660_3771_96631.jpg

For the breads, Vince brushed extra virgin olive oil over baguette slices, then topped them with slices and shreds of mozzarella and fresh ground black pepper:

gallery_28660_3771_76326.jpg

He then topped these with capers and chopped olives:

gallery_28660_3771_25141.jpg

and put them in the oven.

Meanwhile, he tossed the farfalle he had cooking with more olive oil and chives:

gallery_28660_3771_61441.jpg

and let that mixture sit while I cooked four eggs, sunny side up.

gallery_28660_3771_30843.jpg

Meanwhile, he mixed the farfalle with shredded Gruyere cheese. The eggs then went on top of the pasta, and the whole affair got more chives and pepper:

gallery_28660_3771_47998.jpg

and finally, one last drizzle of olive oil along with the bread rounds.

gallery_28660_3771_74054.jpg

The dish--Vince referred to it as "farfalle Gruyere"--lived up to its advance billing: simple and delicious.

The preparation took place to the sounds of Todd Rundgren (the pride of Upper Darby) and Jamiroquai (from nowhere near here, no sir) and was accompanied by margaritas before and a white Zinfandel during dinner. As we were winding down the meal, Vince's fiance Brian Hill and my good friend and roomie-for-now Chris Ragsdale--who I had attempted to awaken for dinner, but could not budge; next time, I'll have to use the thermonuclear device I keep on hand for urgent situations--joined us for more fruity concoctions made with tequila, a little more wine and a little conversation.

gallery_28660_3771_43890.jpg

That's Chris on the left and Brian on the right.

As I previewed this post, it struck me that some might say I lead a multiethnic life. I've had one foot firmly planted in both black and white America for as long as I can remember. My mother, who sensed early on that I was unusually bright and wanted me to make the most of my gifts, had me transferred out of the neighborhood public school I would have attended before I even started school and enrolled in a smaller, all-white public school across town near the University of Missouri-Kansas City. From that day on, I would never attend a majority black school.

Meantime, my father's side of the family--which, ironically enough, was more black-bourgeois than my mother's family--expressed concern that I would not be exposed enough to my heritage in "the white folks' schools" and saw to it that my education was supplemented by liberal doses of black history (I still have in my library the copy of Langston Hughes' An Illustrated History of the Negro in America that Grandma Smith gave me for my ninth birthday in 1966). And Mom's sisters, who didn't quite share her ambition to beat the high-yaller folks and Whitey at their own game, and their children--my cousins--did their best to keep me at least a little grounded in "where I came from" and leaven my book smarts with common sense (which didn't quite take for some reason).

Because of all this, I sort of defy easy categorization. You could call me an Oreo, and you wouldn't be off the mark, but I'm every bit as black as the folks who don't call me that in jest. But no matter what you call me, just don't call me late for dinner.

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

Link to comment
Share on other sites

<rubs sand from eyes, stretches, yawns>

Is it morning already?

Yep, it is--it's light out...

Today is Tuesday, October 24, the 297th day of 2006. There are 68 days left in the year.

Today's Philadelphia forecast: Same s**t, different day, only colder. Forecast high 53F, forecast low 38f, colder in the 'burbs.

On this day:

In 1260, the magnificent Chartres Cathedral is dedicated in the presence of King Louis IX of France. The cathedral is a UNESCO World Heritage Site--as is Independence Hall in Philadelphia.

In 1648, the Peace of Westphalia is signed, ending the Thirty Years' War.

In 1795, Poland ceased to exist as Austria, Prussia and Russia divvied up the country among them.

In 1861, the first transcontinental telegraph line is completed across the United States.

In 1929, as Variety put it, "Wall St. Lays an Egg" as stock prices crashed on "Black Thursday," the opening act of the Great Depression.

In 1939, nylon stockings first go on sale in Wilmington, Delaware, hometown of nylon's inventor, E.I. DuPont de Nemours & Co.

In 1945, the United Nations came into being as 29 nations ratified its charter. In 1949, the cornerstone of its headquarters building was laid in New York City.

In 1980, the Polish government legalized the independent Solidarity trade union.

In 2003, the Concorde made its last commercial flight, bringing the era of supersonic passenger transport to a close--for now.

In 2005, Rosa Parks, the woman who launched the Montgomery bus boycott--the first major victory for the Civil Rights Movement--by keeping her seat on a bus, died at her home in Detroit.

Famous people born on this day include:

Domitian, emperor of Rome, in 51 CE.

Sarah Josepha Hale, poet, author of "Mary Had a Little Lamb," the first poem ever to be recorded, and the mother of Thanksgiving Day, in 1788 in Newport, New Hampshire.

Moss Hart, American playwright (You Can't Take It With You, The Man Who Came to Dinner), in 1904 in New York City.

Clarence M. Kelley, former Kansas City police chief and later FBI director, in 1911 in Kansas City, Missouri.

Y.A. (Yelberton Abraham) Tittle, American football player, in 1926 in Marshall, Texas.

Kweisi Mfume, former head of the NAACP and Democratic U.S. representative from Maryland, in 1948 in Baltimore.

B.D. (Bradley Darryl) Wong, award-winning openly gay American actor (M. Butterfly, Law & Order: Special Victims Unit), in 1962 in San Francisco.

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nice cheese plate. Strong, intense offerings. Love it!!

I like the bowl that the cheese knife is on. Green transferware?

Yes, it is--it's part of a set called "Ye Olde Curiosity Shoppe" with a Dickensian London theme, which Gary inherited from his mother.

That bowl had been filled with Triscuits five minutes before I took that picture.

I have to get myself ready to return to the CJC to resume jury deliberations now. I'll be back online this evening to bring you all up to speed on Monday--and maybe even get a little food history in. I realize that I am fulfilling one of the most important obligations of American citizenship, but jury service does throw a monkey wrench in one's routine.

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Buon compleano Sandy!!

As usual, I'm running late...but wish you many happy returns. Don't get your knickers in a twist about nearing 50. I've crossed the great divide and I'm still alive and well!

I didn't know Yuengling came from Pottsville... I was born in Pottsville. As usual, you come thru with some cool facts!

I love the vibrancy of the Philadelphia food culture. It's not as gussied up, or as self-conscious as the NY culture, but it offers a more approachable take on food and eating. I don't want to start any sort of ny-philly debate, it's just an observation from someone who has spent a lot of time in NY, and has enjoyed discovering what Philadelphia has to offer.

Oh, and Sandy, I would never, ever, think of calling you late for dinner. :raz:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm assuming Gary is the second from the left in the dinner photo above? I like Vince's shirt; it looks like eyelashes. And is that you in the photos next to him? :wink:

One of the things I'm loving about this blog is how we're getting to know more about you. More, more!

"Oh, tuna. Tuna, tuna, tuna." -Andy Bernard, The Office
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Belated Happy Birthday!

Here's wishing you as many more, all in good health. Your writings in various posts hither and yon cause me to take a different look at my city/'burbs. Thanks for that.

"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So today I was following a vehicle with a Widener University license plate and I thought, "Now where to I know that from?" Is it you? Do you work there?

~ Lori in PA

My blog: http://inmykitcheninmylife.blogspot.com/

My egullet blog: http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=89647&hl=

"Cooking is not a chore, it is a joy."

- Julia Child

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm assuming Gary is the second from the left in the dinner photo above?  I like Vince's shirt; it looks like eyelashes.  And is that you in the photos next to him? :wink:

Both assumptions incorrect, I'm sorry to say, but thanks for taking years off my appearance! (Not that I think I look all that aged. In general, I think that African-American men who take care of themselves even a little bit age very well and look younger than their years well into their old age. You can judge whether I've done this downthread, where I will post a photo of myself later tonight, after I've finished a resume job.)

From left to right, the people in the picture are Christopher Ragsdale, James Dorn, Vincent Ancona and Brian. (I think I got his last name wrong upthread. Those who know me at all know I'm horrible with names unless my first encounter with you was memorable or I've had the chance to repeat your name many times.)

One of the things I'm loving about this blog is how we're getting to know more about you.  More, more!

I believe I said in my first narrative post on this foodblog that I would offer civic, culinary and personal history this time around. There's more to come.

But for now, since you've mentioned him, you probably won't see much of Gary in this blog. We are still together after 23 years, and I know he still loves me and I him, but our relationship is not the same as it was 23 or 10 or even five years ago.

I love being out and about in crowds or at large social events. It was at one such event that Gary met me back in 1983. I enjoy working the room at parties. I like performing before an audience. Except to the extent that the college students he teaches constitute an audience too, Gary can't stand any of this--he prefers things small and intimate and enjoys being the center of small-scale attention. I spent much of the first 15 years or so living according to his preferences, and I had no problem doing that as long as I got the emotional satisfaction, affection and pride of place I wanted in return.

But then things changed. He found someone who gave him one thing that I was unable to (and which I was okay with him finding elsewhere) and then fell in love with him. Besides feeling that this person was my inferior in just about every way but that one, I resented his incorporating him into our life in the places I thought I belonged alone. A bout of clinical depression (my father had it too) and an 18-month stretch spent cold sober a few years ago put me in a place I hadn't been before: a few steps back from the relationship, asking whether I wanted to remain in it.

One of my personality traits is a severe aversion to dramatic change. I don't like it and will put up with a lot in order to avoid having to experience it. So what has ended up happening is that I pretty much pursue my own life much the way I did when Gary met me all those years ago, only in the same space that he also occupies. He knows what is happening and why. That he hasn't chosen to go his own way says something about both of us too--but then again, he has 15 years on me age-wise, so doing so would be even harder for him emotionally than it would be for me.

Okay, enough deep here-and-now personal history for now. Back to food and dining and Philly.

Edited by MarketStEl (log)

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By Duvel
      The first week of November are „autumn holidays“ in the area where I live. We wanted to use that time to go to Paris, but when my parents-in-law somewhat surprisingly announced they‘d be coming over from Spain for the whole of November, we scrapped that idea and looked for something more German …
       
      So … Berlin. Not the best time to travel (cold & rainy), but with a couple of museums for the little one and the slightly older ones to enjoy together, plus some food options I was looking forward it was a destination we could all agree on. The Covid19 warnings in the Berlin subway support that notion …
       

       
    • By liuzhou
      Note: This follows on from the Munching with the Miao topic.
       
      The three-hour journey north from Miao territory ended up taking four, as the driver missed a turning and we had to drive on to the next exit and go back. But our hosts waited for us at the expressway exit and led us up a winding road to our destination - Buyang 10,000 mu tea plantation (布央万亩茶园 bù yāng wàn mǔ chá yuán) The 'mu' is  a Chinese measurement of area equal to 0.07 of a hectare, but the 10,000 figure is just another Chinese way of saying "very large".
       
      We were in Sanjiang Dong Autonomous County, where 57% of the inhabitants are Dong.
       
      The Dong people (also known as the Kam) are noted for their tea, love of glutinous rice and their carpentry and architecture. And their hospitality. They tend to live at the foot of mountains, unlike the Miao who live in the mid-levels.
       
      By the time we arrived, it was lunch time, but first we had to have a sip of the local tea. This lady did the preparation duty.
       

       

       
      This was what we call black tea, but the Chinese more sensibly call 'red tea'. There is something special about drinking tea when you can see the bush it grew on just outside the window!
       
      Then into lunch:
       

       

      Chicken Soup
       

      The ubiquitous Egg and Tomato
       

      Dried fish with soy beans and chilli peppers. Delicious.
       

      Stir fried lotus root
       

      Daikon Radish
       

      Rice Paddy Fish Deep Fried in Camellia Oil - wonderful with a smoky flavour, but they are not smoked.
       

      Out of Focus Corn and mixed vegetable
       

      Fried Beans
       

      Steamed Pumpkin
       

      Chicken
       

      Beef with Bitter Melon
       

      Glutinous (Sticky) Rice
       

      Oranges
       

      The juiciest pomelo ever. The area is known for the quality of its pomelos.
       
      After lunch we headed out to explore the tea plantation.
       

       

       

       

       
      Interspersed with the tea plants are these camellia trees, the seeds of which are used to make the Dong people's preferred cooking oil.
       

       
      As we climbed the terraces we could hear singing and then came across this group of women. They are the tea pickers. It isn't tea picking time, but they came out in their traditional costumes to welcome us with their call and response music. They do often sing when picking. They were clearly enjoying themselves.
       

       
      And here they are:
       
       
      After our serenade we headed off again, this time to the east and the most memorable meal of the trip. Coming soon.
       
       
    • By FoodMuse
      Hello everyone,
      eGullet was nice enough to invite me to write a food blog chronicling what I've made or eaten out for one week. I'm so excited about it! Thanks guys.
      About me:
      I dream about food, I wake thinking what's for dinner and I'm so excited to share it with you. I'm part of the food world in New York. By that, I just mean that I'm so fortunate enough to be invited to great events where I get to eat great food. I'm also a nerd and a part of the technology world. I produce, edit and sometimes host food related web videos and I'm also a part of the tech world.
      I'm launching a website called Please, Pass the Gravy. www.pleasepassthegravy.com We let you create a menu, invite friends and then collaborate on that menu. Never host another potluck with 8 pasta salads. You could use it now, but we're alpha launch, it works but it's ugly. It's my ugly baby. So, if you use it be kind and message me if you have improvement ideas. I thought it would be ok to write about it here because it is food related.
      I live in Brooklyn with a lovely guy who likes to eat and a small corgi mix dog. I cook pretty much every night and do a nice brunch on the weekend. I am not a crazy dog lady, but I do admit to cooking food for the dog. I have an excuse, beyond doting, he had seizures that have stopped since not feeding him dog food.
      Foods I cook:
      Spicy foods! If you look at my blog I have a simple papaya ketchup with habanero that is pretty darn good.
      I love great cheese. This may be the week for Beer Cheese Soup.
      I try to limit carbs, though I do cheat.
      In any given week C. and I probably eat cauliflower, broccoli and green beans as a side.
      Tonight's dinner will be Vietnamese inspired. We'll see how it goes. I'll post about it as soon as I can.
      Any requests? Questions? I'd love to hear from you.
      -Grace
    • By Duvel
      In these challenging times, a full summer vacation is not an easy task. For the last 1.5 years we have been mostly at home with the clear plan to visit Catalonia (or more precise my wife’s family) latest this summer. And it looked good for a while. Unfortunately, the recent rise in case numbers in Spain have resulted in …
       
      OK, let’s skip this part. Long story short - my wife and me are fully vaccinated, as are >90% of the people we care about in Catalonia. After some discussion (after all, Germans tend to prefer to be on the safe side of things) we simply fueled up the car, got each a test (for the transit through France) and started to drive …
       
      After a leisurely 11h drive we arrived at a small fishing town somewhat north of Barcelona around 3.00am. We unloaded the car and my wife an the little one went straight to bed. 
       

       


      I found an expired beer in the elsewise pretty empty fridge and enjoyed the cool breeze on the terrace. Holidays, here we come …
       

    • By liuzhou
      Last week, Liuzhou government invited a number of diplomats from Laos, Malaysia, Indonesia, Myanmar/Burma, Poland, and Germany to visit the city and prefecture. They also invited me along. We spent Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday introducing the diplomats to the culture of the local ethnic groups and especially to their food culture.
       
      First off, we headed two hours north into the mountains of Rongshui Miao Autonomous County. The Miao people (苗族 miáo zú), who include the the Hmong, live in the mid-levels of mountains and are predominantly subsistence farmers. Our first port of call was the county town, also Rongshui (融水 róng shuǐ, literal meaning: Melt Water) where we were to have lunch. But before lunch we had to go meet some people and see their local crafts. These are people I know well from my frequent work trips to the area, but for the diplomats, it was all new.
       
      So, I had to wait for lunch, and I see no reason why you shouldn't either. Here are some of the people I live and work with.


       
      This lovely young woman is wearing the traditional costume of an unmarried girl. Many young women, including her, wear this every day, but most only on festive occasions.
       
      Her hat is made from silver (and is very heavy). Here is a closer look.
       

       
      Married women dispense with those gladrags and go for this look:
       

       
      As you can see she is weaving bamboo into a lantern cover.
       
      The men tend to go for this look, although I'm not sure that the Bluetooth earpiece for his cellphone is strictly traditional.
       

       
      The children don't get spared either
       

       
      This little girl is posing with the Malaysian Consul-General.
       
      After meeting these people we went on to visit a 芦笙 (lú shēng) workshop. The lusheng is a reed wind instrument and an important element in the Miao, Dong and Yao peoples' cultures.
       

       

       
      Then at last we headed to the restaurant, but as is their custom, in homes and restaurants, guests are barred from entering until they go through the ritual of the welcoming cup of home-brewed rice wine.
       


      The consular staff from Myanmar/Burma and Malaysia "unlock" the door.
       
      Then you have the ritual hand washing part.
       

       
      Having attended to your personal hygiene, but before  entering the dining room, there is one more ritual to go through. You arrive here and sit around this fire and wok full of some mysterious liquid on the boil.
       

       
      On a nearby table is this
       

       
      Puffed rice, soy beans, peanuts and scallion. These are ladled into bowls.
       

       
      with a little salt, and then drowned in the "tea" brewing in the wok.
       
      This is  油茶 (yóu chá) or Oil Tea. The tea is made from Tea Seed Oil which is made from the seeds of the camellia bush. This dish is used as a welcoming offering to guests in homes and restaurants. Proper etiquette suggests that three cups is a minimum, but they will keep refilling your cup until you stop drinking. First time I had it I really didn't like it, but I persevered and now look forward to it.
       

      L-R: Director of the Foreign Affairs Dept of Liuzhou government, consuls-general of Malaysia, Myanmar, Laos.
       
      Having partaken of the oil tea, finally we are allowed to enter the dining room, where two tables have been laid out for our use.
       

       
      Let the eating, finally, begin.
       
      In no particular order:
       

      Steamed corn, taro and sweet potato
       

      Bamboo Shoots
       

      Duck
       

      Banana leaf stuffed with sticky rice and mixed vegetables and steamed.
       

      Egg pancake with unidentified greenery
       

      Stir fried pork and beans
       

      Stir fried Chinese banana (Ensete lasiocarpum)
       

      Pig Ears
       

       
      This may not look like much, but was the star of the trip. Rice paddy fish, deep fried in camellia tree seed oil with wild mountain herbs. We ate this at every meal, cooked with slight variations, but never tired of it.
       

      Stir fried Greens
       
      Our meal was accompanied by the wait staff singing to us and serving home-made rice wine (sweetish and made from the local sticky rice).
       
       
       
       
      Everything we ate was grown or reared within half a kilometre of the restaurant and was all free-range, organic. And utterly delicious.
       
      Roll on dinner time.
       
      On the trip I was designated the unofficial official photographer and ended up taking 1227 photographs. I just got back last night and was busy today, so I will try to post the rest of the first day (and dinner) as soon as I can.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...