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Help with a phrase "A Touch of Grace


LaurieB
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Well, one place I've seen this is in Shirley Corriher's, "Cookwise". They are the name she gives to her grandmother's biscuits...

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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I was just wandering among the shelves of the library when a book peered out at me. It is titled "Cooking with Grace" by Grace Pilato. It's about Italian cookery. I am not sure if this might be an answer to your question, but it seemed close enough so, there it is!

Wonderful phrase, though. Even from reading your topic title, it's been lurking around my edges of thought. In a story recently I read the line "You can not summon grace with a whistle."

Indeed not.

But how wonderful when it does appear. :smile:

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Surely this phrase comes from a religious base. It has been around for possibly centuries and Shirley was just making a pun because her grandmother was named Grace.

Ruth Dondanville aka "ruthcooks"

“Are you making a statement, or are you making dinner?” Mario Batali

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Surely this phrase comes from a religious base.  It has been around for possibly centuries and Shirley was just making a pun because her grandmother was named Grace.

Sure, I believe that too. I just thougth that LaurieB was looking for some reference in a food context.

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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Thank you all -- it was in Shirley Corriher's "Cookwise" that I saw the reference.

The phrase had stuck in my mind because, to me, it implied that if you prepared food without respect for the products, and without care for the ones you were preparing it for, it would not turn out as well.

Laurie

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It is one of the readings of 2 Corinthians 12:9-10

"A touch of grace is sufficient to help us through the trials of life " although the King James Version is

"And he said unto me, My grace is sufficient for thee: for my strength is made perfect in weakness. Most gladly therefore will I rather glory in my infirmities, that the power of Christ may rest upon me.

2Cr 12:10 Therefore I take pleasure in infirmities, in reproaches, in necessities, in persecutions, in distresses for Christ's sake: for when I am weak, then am I strong.

I can't trace the first use of the actual phrase, but "A touch of" sounds early twentieth century. Used as book and record titles, and as bakery and other shop names

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