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Chocolate Sauce


jturn00
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I recently came back from france where I had the most delicious chocolate sauce on top of my profiteroles. I wanted to try to duplicate it here at home. Basically, the sauce was rich and velvety with a deep chocolate taste. It also didn't clump when placed on top of ice cream. (this sauce could be used for a coupe denmark or creme legiere).

I have quite a few cookbooks at home (wybauw, torres, bo frieburg, chris felder, etc) but with all the different sauces and combinations for sauce in each of these books I was looking for opinions on where you found the best recipe or what you consider to be the best combination of ingredients for making a good sauce. I have very high end chocolate at home (becolade, felchlin with percentages of 65% to 72%).

Jeff

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I haven't seen most of the others but I use Bo Friebergs recipe the most as it doesn't have any dairy in it, thus reducing spoilage.

I usually use Cocoa Berry 58% or Cocoa Noel, same percentage.

For cocoa I use Cocoa Berry Extra Brut.

Have gone as high as a 72% for the sauce but most of the time I prefer to have the actual dessert feature the "bigger" taste.

Good Luck!

PS: If you were in France who knows, it may have been Valrhona or it could have been a very "ordinary" chocolate.

What kind of place was it in you had the profiteroles?

2317/5000

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Here's mine. I use E Guitard for almost everything.

350 ml water

300 g sugar

25 ml water

1 T cornstarch

80 g 72% couveture

50 g cocoa powder

Bring the sugar and first portion of water to a boil. Make a slurry with the second portion of water and the cornstarch, and whisk it in, letting it simmer for a couple minutes. Stir in the couverture and cocoa powder, and keeping stiring till its smooth and glossy. Strain and chill.

Edited by Sethro (log)
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The deep rich flavor actually comes from the cocoa.

You need a recipe that has water, dutch processed cocoa powder, sugar, and chocolate. Your thickening agent can be whatever you want, but a good easy choice is always cornstarch.

If you need a recipe let me know. I am just being lazy right now and not posting one automatically.

Edited by chiantiglace (log)

Dean Anthony Anderson

"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This

Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

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PS: If you were in France who knows, it may have been Valrhona or it could have been a very "ordinary" chocolate.

What kind of place was it in you had the profiteroles?

We were in Biarritz at a pizza place called "Le Majestic Chez Fernanda" which is a Pizzeria Restaurant and Creperie. It made great pizzas (very fresh ingredients). I had a cepes pizza (which were just coming into season). It was also casual which made it nice after a day of sightseeing/driving.

Jeff

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Here's mine. I use E Guitard for almost everything.

350 ml water

300 g sugar

25 ml water

1 T cornstarch

80 g 72% couveture

50 g cocoa powder

Bring the sugar and first portion of water to a boil. Make a slurry with the second portion of water and the cornstarch, and whisk it in, letting it simmer for a couple minutes. Stir in the couverture and cocoa powder, and keeping stiring till its smooth and glossy. Strain and chill.

Question, I also have the E Guitard couveture, will this recipe 'do' with the white chocolate as well? I have boxes of both. This seems like an ideal recipe, as I assume when chilled it remains liquid. You serve this how? With what? Have you used it as an ingredient in say a strusal like cake? Forgive the questions, I will make the sauce anyway even if just to use on icecream, it just seems like it could do a lot of things...

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Here's mine. I use E Guitard for almost everything.

350 ml water

300 g sugar

25 ml water

1 T cornstarch

80 g 72% couveture

50 g cocoa powder

Bring the sugar and first portion of water to a boil. Make a slurry with the second portion of water and the cornstarch, and whisk it in, letting it simmer for a couple minutes. Stir in the couverture and cocoa powder, and keeping stiring till its smooth and glossy. Strain and chill.

Question, I also have the E Guitard couveture, will this recipe 'do' with the white chocolate as well? I have boxes of both. This seems like an ideal recipe, as I assume when chilled it remains liquid. You serve this how? With what? Have you used it as an ingredient in say a strusal like cake? Forgive the questions, I will make the sauce anyway even if just to use on icecream, it just seems like it could do a lot of things...

No because once you put cocoa powder in it, its not white chocolate anymore.

And yes, for the richness you need the cocoa powder.

Dean Anthony Anderson

"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This

Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

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Here's mine. I use E Guitard for almost everything.

350 ml water

300 g sugar

25 ml water

1 T cornstarch

80 g 72% couveture

50 g cocoa powder

Bring the sugar and first portion of water to a boil. Make a slurry with the second portion of water and the cornstarch, and whisk it in, letting it simmer for a couple minutes. Stir in the couverture and cocoa powder, and keeping stiring till its smooth and glossy. Strain and chill.

Question, I also have the E Guitard couveture, will this recipe 'do' with the white chocolate as well? I have boxes of both. This seems like an ideal recipe, as I assume when chilled it remains liquid. You serve this how? With what? Have you used it as an ingredient in say a strusal like cake? Forgive the questions, I will make the sauce anyway even if just to use on icecream, it just seems like it could do a lot of things...

No because once you put cocoa powder in it, its not white chocolate anymore.

And yes, for the richness you need the cocoa powder.

duh. Thanks, I needed that.

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The deep rich flavor actually comes from the cocoa.

You need a recipe that has water, dutch processed cocoa powder, sugar, and chocolate.  Your thickening agent can be whatever you want, but a good easy choice is always cornstarch.

If you need a recipe let me know.  I am just being lazy right now and not posting one automatically.

Thanks for the info I will first check the cookbooks I own for a recipe.

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a deep rich chocolate flavor is gained in chocolate sauce by actually simmering the mixture -- unlike when making a ganache where you only want to get it hot enough to melt the chocolate, in a sauce it is a good thing to get the sauce over the temperature where the cacao molecules bust open. (think fudge.) Just be vigilant and don't stop stirring or it will scorch.

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Question, I also have the E Guitard couveture, will this recipe 'do' with the white chocolate as well? I have boxes of both. This seems like an ideal recipe, as I assume when chilled it remains  liquid. You serve this how? With what? Have you used it as an ingredient in say a strusal like cake? Forgive the questions, I will make the sauce anyway even if just to use on icecream, it just seems like it could do a lot of things...

If you want a dairy-free white chocolate sauce (I mean, not including the milk solids in the chocolate itself), I use a glucose based one.

I only use the chocolate sauce for the plate. I don't really understand what you maean about baking with it...

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