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Gordon Ramsay at the London


johnder
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Since they are offically taking reservations, I figured it was time to have an official reviews and discussion thread for Gordon Ramsays new place at the London Hotel.

There is a long discussion about the lead up to his opening here, let's use this thread for reviews of the food, decor, experience, etc.

The official website for the restaurant is located here.

Gordon Ramsay at the London

151 West 54th Street

Reservations main dining room: 212.468.8888

The London Bar: 212.468.8889

John Deragon

foodblog 1 / 2

--

I feel sorry for people that don't drink. When they wake up in the morning, that's as good as they're going to feel all day -- Dean Martin

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Right you are Sneak,

They start taking reservations today, for the first public serving on Nov 16th.

John

John Deragon

foodblog 1 / 2

--

I feel sorry for people that don't drink. When they wake up in the morning, that's as good as they're going to feel all day -- Dean Martin

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Z...

I made a reservation today, shockingly, I just called .....they picked up in 5 rings and Booked lunch.

I am trying lunch before commiting to dinner.

Lunch 3 courses $45

Dinner 3 courses $85

Its either the best deal in the city or the dishes are microscopic.

Atelier Robuchn has lots of single dishes that cost more than that....

We shall see....

The website is Lame, there is barely any info.

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Lunch 3 courses $45

Dinner 3 courses $85

Its either the best deal in the city or the dishes are microscopic.

Three courses at $85 is around the going rate at the city's high-end restaurants. If anything, it's a bargain if you assume that NYT 4/Michelin 3-star restaurants are Ramsay's peers. Unless Ramsay falls flat on his face, I suspect the $85 dinner price will go up after the restaurant finds its legs. Just a few comparison points:

Per Se, $210 (7 or 9 courses; service included)

Alain Ducasse, $150

Le Bernardin, $105 (4 courses)

Daniel, $96

Jean Georges, $95 (4 courses)

Chanterelle, $95

Country, $85 (4 courses)

The Modern, $82

Aquavit, $80

Gilt, $78

Gramercy Tavern, $76

Veritas, $76

Asiate, $75

Cru, $74

(In each case, I've listed the restaurant's least expensive dinner option. I also omitted restaurants that offer their food à la carte — even some fairly expensive ones like Bouley and The Four Seasons that would be comparably expensive if you order at least three courses.)

Edited by oakapple (log)
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Just made a lunch reso for mid-December. It should be noted that merely calling the restaurant is entertainment in itself.

Particular gems included, "We'll ring you the day before to confirm your reservation."

And, "No trainers are allowed in the dining room." To which I responded, "Umm, what?" To which she sweetly chuckled, "Sorry. Sneakers, sir." I was charmed.

In regards to pricing, I think Vadouvan is right. They'll have a prix fixe $45 menu, an $85 menu, and a $117 tasting menu, all available at lunch.

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  • 2 weeks later...
I predict it will be more "maze" portions and plate aesthetic than "royal hospital road"

"There will be a 48 seat fine dining restaurant based on Restaurant Gordon Ramsay at Royal Hospital Road in Chelsea, an informal Maze-style dining room that will seat 92, plus 50 in the bar. The kitchen will be responsible for the room service at the hotel too."

Gordon Ramsay writing in the November 2006 edition of olive magazine.

I understand from sources close to the Ramsay organisation that when they say "based on Royal Hospital Road" they mean they also want to emulate its 3 Michelin star rating.

Edited by Andy Lynes (log)
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Why is that funny? Its common practice in the UK - its to try and cut down on the number of no-shows.

It seems fair enough, it's just that sometimes it does not work in the customers favor.

They called me while I was on a plane between JFK and Heathrow.

When I landed in london, went home to catch some zzzz's, woke up and showed up for my 7pm reso, it was "rescinded" because they hadnt heard from me.

I was at eventually with no harm done......but policies arent air tight in thier intent.

Andy, I see you still like your signature line...hehe

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I just called for a December 30th resy. The reservation agent told me about the dining room's dress code (jacket & tie for the gentleman, "smart dress" for the lady), but she spoke in an American accent and idiom.

The only notable quirk was that, after I requested a table for two, the agent asked, "Will that be Mr. and Mrs?" I don't have any secrets about whom I'm dining with, but these days that might be considered a needlessly intrusive question.

(In another 17 days, we'll have more to talk about than just the reservations line.)

Edited by oakapple (log)
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The comments about the dress code are so interesting. I called the day the reservation lines opened for a Nov. 25 reservation and nothing was mentioned about the dress code, although obviously I wouldn't expect "trainers" to be appropriate attire. I can't wait for the first reviews to start coming in.

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When I made the reservation a while back I was told "Jacket is requested of gentleman"

No mention of ties. I assume one wouldn't wear "trainers" with a jacket, unless you are in the Hamptons wearing a seersucker suit with dashing boat sneakers.

John Deragon

foodblog 1 / 2

--

I feel sorry for people that don't drink. When they wake up in the morning, that's as good as they're going to feel all day -- Dean Martin

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Particular gems included, "We'll ring you the day before to confirm your reservation."

Why is that funny? Its common practice in the UK - its to try and cut down on the number of no-shows.

My simpleton self was amused at the verb "to ring." I'm easily amused, what can I say? I also love British accents on women.

The only notable quirk was that, after I requested a table for two, the agent asked, "Will that be Mr. and Mrs?" I don't have any secrets about whom I'm dining with, but these days that might be considered a needlessly intrusive question.

(In another 17 days, we'll have more to talk about than just the reservations line.)

This isn't all that related but a similar thing happened with the g/f making a reso at per se earlier today. She made the reso under my name and the reservationist asked if she was my secretary. I'm not sure how appropriate that question is. Personally I wanted her to say something like "Yes, I am his secretary, and I'll be dining with him."

ETA: Thanks for the link, Andy. It appears that Jean-Baptiste, from the F Word, will be running the dining room. I'm excited.

Edited by BryanZ (log)
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Particular gems included, "We'll ring you the day before to confirm your reservation."

Why is that funny? Its common practice in the UK - its to try and cut down on the number of no-shows.

My simpleton self was amused at the verb "to ring." I'm easily amused, what can I say? I also love British accents on women.

OK, I understand now. Its such an everyday expression here that it didn't register as being anything odd. You have to remember that, until about 25 years ago, phones in the UK still had dials and they did ring.

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Lunch 3 courses $45

Dinner 3 courses $85

I went to a lunch where Ramsay was speaker last week. He said pricing dishes on the menu is a critical issue. A diner’s perception of the cost can influence the evening’s spending. “If we go into a restaurant and we know that the food’s good and not expensive, I guarantee you’ll spend another £5 or £10 on a bottle of wine. Subconsciously we know damn well it’s not as easy to make money on wine as it is on food.”

He said they had a situation at Claridge’s five years ago where they opened the restaurant with a £21 lunch menu. “The general manager got really upset with the fact that I was ‘degrading’ the front of the hotel. He thought that we were cheapening the brand of Claridge’s. So we had an argument, as we do, and we established the importance of removing intimidation and admittedly we never made money on £21, but what we did do, we established a very healthy business and the money we didn’t make on the food was made up on what we’d done on the wine. Now of course, five years later, the lunch menu is £30 and we still cater a fully booked lunch five, six lunches out of seven.”

The rest of my report is on my website if anyone wants to read more.

I'd say he doesn't want to intimidate New Yorkers at this stage :wink:

Edited by Pat Churchill (log)

Website: http://cookingdownunder.com

Blog: http://cookingdownunder.com/blog

Twitter: @patinoz

The floggings will continue until morale improves

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