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Beautiful food words


Kent Wang
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If "petite tete de chou" is something to eat, it sounds good? :huh:

SB (mise en place and sans fromage about depletes my supply of French :sad: )

PS:  Oh, and boeuf, which really doesn't sound all that great? :blink:

It's a childhood endearment and means "little cabbage head." So yes, you could certainly eat it, especially sauteed with bacon. :biggrin:

Shelley: Would you like some pie?

Gordon: MASSIVE, MASSIVE QUANTITIES AND A GLASS OF WATER, SWEETHEART. MY SOCKS ARE ON FIRE.

Twin Peaks

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mise en place - it evokes great expectations of a lovely meal.

Judy Jones aka "moosnsqrl"

Sharing food with another human being is an intimate act that should not be indulged in lightly.

M.F.K. Fisher

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Schlagobers is my all time favorite food word -- not just a little whipped cream, but hills, mountains tributaries oceans of it. Cue a waltz.

Edited to add personal info about Austro-Hungarian pastry and the naming of children. Our only child , a daughter, has one of those old -fashioned Quality names mentioned upthread: not Faith, Hope or Chastity but the Anglo/Irish Honor. Thank God we had a girl, because we couldn't agree on a boy's name. I like Scots names for boys: Murdo, Angus, Jock, Callum and especially Ian, because it's my father's name. Father- to -be would have nothing to do with it, and not because he liked Brian or Jason, the hottest boy names around. Nor did he wish to continue the alternate generation Joseph/Louis tradition in his family.

We'd made, from the Time-Life Cooking of Vienna's Empire, that decadent chocolate/ganache confection Rigo Janczi, named after an Hungarian gypsy violinist. My husband said "Rigo. I want Rigo. I have no second choice."

Cue Czardas. I don't know if a kid named Rigo would have a tougher time growing up with that name than Honor did with hers. She loves her name now, and perhaps Rigo would have too.

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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Yes, I have a touch of Ausberger's when it comes to The Naming of Things -- ask anyone who knows me! If Gwyneth Paltrow can have a daughter who rejoices in the name of Apple (no cynicism here, by the way) why can't Bacon be the next hot eccentric name? Heck, one could always say, WASP style, "It was my mother's maiden name."

Muffaletta is a lovely food word.

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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  If Gwyneth Paltrow can have a daughter who rejoices in the name of Apple (no cynicism here, by the way) why can't Bacon be the next hot eccentric name? Heck, one could always say, WASP style, "It was my mother's maiden name."

Muffaletta is a lovely food word.

I've seen Apple as a middle name: J. Apple Seed, (Planter), Bacon as a last name: Kevin (actor) and Roger(Oxford don), and Heck was my Dentist (Dr Frank P.)'s last name.

SB (it was shortened from Hecomovich)

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Mofongo. It's just melodious.

And Maggie, I think Honor is a beautiful name, and one of the virtues that is oft overlooked, both in naming, and in general!

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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And for a slightly different one, I've always like chitlins (as a word). Also garbonzo, oleo, satsuma, cream, emulsion, martini, clafouti, and copperclad.

ETA: they also make great scrabble words too.

Edited by FistFullaRoux (log)
Screw it. It's a Butterball.
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Anardana (pomegranate seeds)

reminds of me of Anarkali (pom. flower).

Have to pronounce it right: Anaardaanaa (with a soft d)

Anarkali was the name of the heroine

in a major Romeo-Juliet type love

story involving a dancing girl and

Prince Salim, the Great Mughal Emperor Akbar's heir.

Historicity of story is dubious, but the story (product

of an early 20th c Urdu playwright) is great, and

the name and associations are pretty....

Milagai

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