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Beautiful food words


Kent Wang
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skordalia is one of my favorites .. Greek ...

auberginesounds exotic .. purple prose or purple vegetable ... ca ne fait rien ...

mirepoix but uttered in a tiny voice ... in little bits ...

sultana ... lovely and regal way of saying "raisin" ...

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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On a tangent, I would name all my children after food terms: Basil, Ginger, Rosemary.

Excellent choices. Much more practical and long-lasting than those names of yesteryear that people used to dub their offspring with. Faith, Hope, Charity.

:wink:

These names at least are edible, and easier to live up to possibly.

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On a tangent, I would name all my children after food terms: Basil, Ginger, Rosemary.

Excellent choices. Much more practical and long-lasting than those names of yesteryear that people used to dub their offspring with. Faith, Hope, Charity.

:wink:

These names at least are edible, and easier to live up to possibly.

But wouldn't it make you hungry every time you called their names? And can't you just hear the shrewish Sybil Fawlty screeching "Basil!"?

Judy Jones aka "moosnsqrl"

Sharing food with another human being is an intimate act that should not be indulged in lightly.

M.F.K. Fisher

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But wouldn't it make you hungry every time you called their names?  And can't you just hear the shrewish Sybil Fawlty screeching "Basil!"?

I might get hungry if I had a kid named "Pudding". :laugh:

My old-fashioned romantic soul sees Basil Rathbone when I hear the name. Sybil could never ruin that for me. :wub:

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On a tangent, I would name all my children after food terms: Basil, Ginger, Rosemary.

Several years ago, on another discussion board, the topic was nicknames. I made a list of people I've known which I'd fortunately saved as a Word file. I searched through the list and came up with these food related names:

Bones

Popcorn

Bosco

Porkpie

"Frites" (spelled "Freetz")

Java

Coconut

Juicy & Juicer

Taters

Bun

Beanie & Beaner

Boozy

Beefy

SB (never one to pass up a tangent) :huh:

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I like the German word for chocolate:

Schokolade

(Show'-koe-lahd-eh) The first syllable is not really "show", it's somewhere between "show" and "shah". There is almost an equal accent on the first and third syllables.)

edited to improve the phonetic pronunciation...

Edited by ludja (log)

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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Is the e at the end pronounced as well?

I like how the German version clearly pronounces the second syllable, unlike in English where it is often casually pronounced 'choclet'.

You're right; the "e" is pronounced although it is not strongly emphasized. Thanks for correcting me; I'll go back and edit it.

Yeah, I think it sounds more melodious than 'chocklet' or even 'chocolate'.

Edited by ludja (log)

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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I'm partial to the sound of French words: genoise, pate sucree, caramel au beurre salé. . .

"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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If "petite tete de chou" is something to eat, it sounds good? :huh:

SB (mise en place and sans fromage about depletes my supply of French :sad: )

PS: Oh, and boeuf, which really doesn't sound all that great? :blink:

Edited by srhcb (log)
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