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When I lived in Berkeley (next installment of my story) I had a black cat named Mycroft.

Now, I have a black cat named Rasputin. (But, I call him Fatso - don't want him to get too full of himself.)

Hmmm. A genius and a mystic. Guess it's a chancy toss-up which one of those two would be more of a gourmand.

I have a black cat named Pavlova at the moment. She has six toes and a charming singing voice. Odd thing about this cat - she will not eat her supper alone. I have to keep her company while she dines. (Sounds like Rasputin does *not* have this problem :laugh: .)


Edited by Carrot Top (log)

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What a unique story! I look forward to the next installment.

Thanks! A couple of weeks, I think...

It will be worth the wait, but it will be more than a couple of weeks ... a month, maybe. I have a bunch of swell stuff on the publishing schedule in between.

Potato flour doughnuts? Are they an Indiana specialty? I've never heard of them.


Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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I remember the Spud Nut in Richmond, but as far as I can tell, potato flour doughnuts started (predictably, I suppose) in the Northwest US. There's still a Spud Nut cafe there, though I'm not sure it's related to the one Chef Carey wrote about.

Since we're going to have to wait for the next installment, maybe the author could be persuaded to entertain us in the interim with a few details about his experience at the "best restaurant in Richmond, Indiana. It was in a motel, the chef was Austrian, the manager German and the sous chef a redneck . . . " I could be wrong, but I'm guessing the hotel would have been the Leland?


Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.

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Whee! The JoyAnn Cake Shoppe! I used to eagerly wait for 2am to ride my bike from Olvey-Andis dorms to the proofing racks there - warm glazed donuts - outstanding!!


I'm a canning clean freak because there's no sorry large enough to cover the, "Oops! I gave you botulism" regrets.

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What size do you wear?

We tossed *most* of it...

Joseph, I wouldn't know how to tell you. I'm a pretty small Filipina (read: petite) who stands at 5'1". :biggrin:


Doddie aka Domestic Goddess

"Nobody loves pork more than a Filipino"

eGFoodblog: Adobo and Fried Chicken in Korea

The dark side... my own blog: A Box of Jalapenos

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I remember the Spud Nut in Richmond, but as far as I can tell, potato flour doughnuts started (predictably, I suppose) in the Northwest US. There's still a Spud Nut cafe there, though I'm not sure it's related to the one Chef Carey wrote about.

Since we're going to have to wait for the next installment, maybe the author could be persuaded to entertain us in the interim with a few details about his experience at the "best restaurant in Richmond, Indiana. It was in a motel, the chef was Austrian, the manager German and the sous chef a redneck . . . " I could be wrong, but I'm guessing the hotel would have been the Leland?

Nope, not the Leland - this was a bona fide *motel.*

All right, maybe this will help segue to the next segment.

There was Dieter, the chef, Gunther, the manager, Dwayne, the ample-bellied sous chef and me. No waiters, just waitresses. Dieter and Gunther often spoke German knowing none of the locals could parlez. I got a lot of insight here, for I had not listed the fact on my application that I studied German for four years in high school. Hid my linguistic lights under a barrel. A lot of the time I couldn’t figure out what language Dwayne was attempting to speak. His favorite joke was “I got the (sp.?) moscus – everything I eat turns to shit.”

Dieter had quite a temper. He was not overfond of the waitresses. The menu tended toward the Midwestern and the Teutonic. Heavy on meat and potatoes. I learned how to grill some steaks here (a highly underrated skill) . Ate my first rare New York strip here. There was no going back to the exsanguine leather of my youth. I learned how to bake a potato – no foil ever. I learned how to sauté vegetables and a few seafood dishes. Just those three bits of knowledge started me off on the right foot. Even though I was underage, I also learned how to tend bar here, a skill which served me in good stead during my college career (I lied on my application.) On slow nights, because I earned much less than the real bartender. Gunther was nothing if not frugal.

Gunther and Dieter used to say really nasty things about the waitresses, auf Deutsche, of course. I would occasionally clue the waitresses in when this or that hammer was about to fall. I actually endeared myself to a couple of them. Getting involved with waitresses, though, most often proves a Sisyphean endeavor. Trust me on this one.

I almost (I think) had the 13-year old American boy’s ultimate fantasy realized. I think this is more or less still the theme is just about every second porn movie made today (I haven't realy kept up with this genre as assiduously as I should have, I must admit); this was certainly true of the black and white’s I saw in the grimy basement of the VFW on Sunday afternoons during my misspent youth.

There was a mysterious, attractive middle-aged woman staying in one of the motel rooms. I would take her steak and potato to her every evening. (Oh, yeah, I did room service, too.) She was very pleasant and a very good tipper. She usually wanted me to stay and chat. These talks were cut short because I had to get back to the kitchen or the dining room. Oh, yeah, I forgot to mention I also bused the tables. Which leads us to the almost denouement. I was out front bussing one evening when her order came in. Dwayne, who had been unrelenting in his salacious remarks about the Mystery Lady and me, decided he would take the food to her room and check her out. A half-hour later the girl from the motel’s front desk was up in Gunther’s face asking who he had take the food to the room. The woman was outraged and wanted her “regular” room service waiter. Sigh. I think Dwayne scared her away. The next night she was gone.

After work Dieter, Dwayne and I would head out to a local tavern sorta cum restaurant, I think it was called Connie’s, owned by a Greek. Their menu was, you guessed it, steaks, but with the addition of Greek salads, and their beer on tap was Wurzburger, a dark, frothy locally brewed quaff. I liked it. A lot. This beer was not at all what one gets in Europe. It was ice cold and served in a huge frosted stein. I used to pick Dieter’s brain at these sessions. I’d ask him questions about some of the things I’d seen him doing throughout the evening. It was culinary school. Dwayne told dirty jokes.

Dieter was a good chef and his strong suit in my mind was his work ethic. But, there was that temper. I left the Bide-a-Wee Steak and Potato Emporium after he threw a 10-inch chef’s knife at one of the swinging doors between the kitchen and dining room – it stuck, vibrating, right behind the waitress who had just exited.

Aren't you sorry you asked? :biggrin:

Oh, the name is the same I remember - The Spudnut Shop. But, the facade looks much more handsome than the kinda shoddy joint I frequented.

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Whee!  The JoyAnn Cake Shoppe!  I used to eagerly wait for 2am to ride my bike from Olvey-Andis dorms to the proofing racks there - warm glazed donuts - outstanding!!

I made the glazed doughnuts in my stepfather's bakeries in both Evansville and Richmond.

Cranked out toroids of batter from a hopper over a vat of fat. Turned them with charred wooden sticks. lifted them out on their rack and then glazed them with a gallon pitcher over a large stainless bowl. I smelled like doughnuts all the time.

Couldn't stand looking at doughnuts for many years thereafter. I like 'em fine now.

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I just LOVE this!!! An unexpected chapter, with the lusty, out-there flavor of the first, and no previews of the morning delight awaiting. I'll bet you just cranked it out wordstream, with the experienced ease of shooting doughnuts into hot grease. (And did you mantra each one into the vat, chanting a whispered "toroid---toroid" under your breath?)---I'll find it difficult to look at one without the word picture for a while. Daughter's donut man is Denny, and it's hard to think of the bakery without thinking, "Denny Does the Donuts."

This is refreshing, the being able to back-and-forth with the writer on personal points in the piece. We usually just give our compliments, then our own perspectives on this and that on the subject, but the craving for MOREMORE is being met here. The pieces which are complete in themselves are perfect as they are, presented round like warm apples in the hand, but the expectation and promise of further adventures---that's the dangle of an even sweeter apple, bringing us back for an anticipatory peek and another comment on the comments, ad infinitum.

This is one of my favorite threads---skeins? yarns? on eG, and I could read a new one every day. Having new viewpoints and added episodes just makes this outstanding.

I've never worked a motel kitchen, never tended bar, never delivered dinner to a lady en deshabille (she, not I), but there's a decided deja vu lurking in every paragraph. From what Maggie hinted (or did you---can't remember) there's a bit of "watching America change" in the chapters to come, and speaking merely from a personal standpoint---do you remember where you were in March, 1965?


Edited by racheld (log)

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I just LOVE this!!!  An unexpected chapter, with the lusty, out-there flavor of the first, and no previews of the morning delight awaiting.  I'll bet you just cranked it out wordstream, with the experienced ease of shooting doughnuts into hot grease.  (And did you mantra each one into the vat, chanting a whispered "toroid---toroid" under your breath?)---I'll find it difficult to look at one without the word picture for a while.  Daughter's donut man is Denny, and it's hard to think of the bakery without thinking, "Denny Does the Donuts."

This is refreshing, the being able to back-and-forth with the writer on personal points in the piece.  We usually just give our compliments, then our own perspectives on this and that on the subject, but the craving for MOREMORE is being met here.  The pieces which are complete in themselves are perfect as they are, presented round like  warm apples in the hand, but the expectation and promise of further adventures---that's the dangle of an even sweeter apple, bringing us back for an anticipatory peek and another comment on the comments, ad infinitum.

This is one of my favorite threads---skeins?  yarns? on eG, and I could read a new one every day.  Having new viewpoints and added episodes just makes this outstanding.

I've never worked a motel kitchen, never tended bar, never delivered dinner to a lady en deshabille (she, not I), but there's a decided deja vu lurking in every paragraph.  From what Maggie hinted (or did you---can't remember) there's a bit of "watching America change" in the chapters to come, and speaking merely from a personal standpoint---do you remember where you were in March, 1965?

Thanks for the kudzus, Rachel. :biggrin:

At that age most of my mantras revolved, not in the orbital sense, around women.

March 1965? Bloomington, Indiana. Part of most days was spent bartending in Nick's English Hut. And parts of every weekday were spent in Ballentine Hall, home of the English Dept., on the Indiana University campus. Attempting to wrest a degree from them. Also cooked a lot with my old friend Denis Kelly, among others. (He has authored some really neat cookbooks - look him up on Amazon.) I do have some stories from here. If Maggie is not going to use them in my series, I'll do some elucidation in this thread.

Maggie? I await your bidding.

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This is so awesome to read. I spent nine months living in Richmond in 2001-2002. I still am there on a semi-regular basis as I complete seminary studies. One of the disadvantages of being an outsider in any town is that it can be hard to see the local color. This covers it and then some. As I said, I still am in Richmond fairly often. Is there anything anyone would recommend I check out on my next visit?

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[i do have some stories from here. If Maggie is not going to use them in my series, I'll do some elucidation in this thread.

Maggie? I await your bidding.

I bid you to continue telling us about your early Hoosier culinary training -- just don't leave the state! :cool:


Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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[i do have some stories from here. If Maggie is not going to use them in my series, I'll do some elucidation in this thread.

Maggie? I await your bidding.

I bid you to continue telling us about your early Hoosier culinary training -- just don't leave the state! :cool:

Well, okay, then! Just as soon as I catch up on a little real work here, I'll continue with my episodic misadventures in Indiana!

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You asked where I was in 1965.

Warning, Will Robinson! Really bad thread drift approaching. I promise I'll get right back to food! Really!

Any time you folks have had enough, just tell me, I'm really pretty easy to shut up.

This is just part of one week in Bloomington - I was there five years.

Bloomington, Indiana – Mid-1960’s

It was getting late – around midnight. I was half – well, maybe ¾ or possibly even a little more – drunk, and sitting cross-legged on the floor of Gerry Rabkin’s living room plunking on a guitar while Suzan, my girlfriend and wife-to-be, was singing “He Was a Friend of Mine,” a la Dave Van Ronk. It had been a pretty good party with a few hills and valleys. Valleys to follow. The front door burst open and it was Allen Ginsberg, who had just departed moments before. He stuck only his head in the door, and stretching his neck out, opened his eyes wide, glaring at me and spat, “Goodnight, inarticulate prose writer!” Slammed the door and left. Whoa!

Let me back up a little.

Ginsberg and Peter Orlovsky had been in Bloomington all week. The Fugs were in town, too. Package deal. The Fugs were staying at my friend Denis’ apartment, as was I. I had just returned from my abortive attempt to get published by Random House in New York. Ran across the Fugs there. Lived on East 10th Street just up the block from Ed Sanders Peace Eye Bookstore. Ed, a poet, was the front man for the Fugs.

The week started with a party to welcome all the above, well, not me, in an English department type’s knotty-pine-paneled basement. In the corner of the room was a keg of beer and standing by it was a besuited, tied, nattily dressed man with a beard, plastic tankard in hand. Actually looked quite out of place with all the rest of us chic-shabby dressed liberal arts degenerates. The irresistible magnetic field of the beer keg soon had me in the corner. I nodded at the dapper gent and said hello, mentioning my name, as I tipped my glass and drew the beer. He stood there, glass in hand, grinning ear to ear and remained mute, staring straight ahead, wouldn’t even make eye contact. How fucking rude! Topped off my brew and said, “Well, it was nice chatting with you.” Drifted away. Host took me to meet Ginsberg, who barely acknowledged me in passing, what was I but a moronic underclass English major – he was busy rapping. Drifted away and mumbled something to a fellow English departmenter about the rude bastard in the corner. She pointed out to me that that was Julius Orlovsky, Peter’s brother who had only recently been released from a decade or so in a mental institution – and that he didn’t function terribly well, but went everywhere with Allen and Peter, Allen’s wife. What a surprise, yet again I had misread my environment.

A bunch of boring English department cocktail party bullshit ensued. I happened to get off in a corner and began talking with a guy I had never seen before. He had unusually long hair for this era. At this time, as a nation, we were just creeping up on acid rock. A handsome, soft-spoken guy, with, it seemed to me, a hint of a Brooklyn accent. We must have chatted idly, mostly about the people in the room, for about an hour. Oddly, we never introduced ourselves to each other, conversation just flowed. Certainly wasn’t the first time I’d talked to someone at length with no particular place to go – over few beers. About this time, much to my surprise, Ginsberg walked right up to us, kinda glancing at me and turning his back on me and hooking his hand under the guy’s arm right above the elbow. “Let’s go Peter,” he said. Thus began a long week.

There was a round of parties every night that week and a few seminars. I’ll just give you a few highlights so we can get on with this.

A couple of days elapse. I think it was on the fourth floor of Ballantine Hall. A small seminar room. Only about 10 folks. Two or three department types, couple of Beat wannabes, some knee-socked, plaid-skirted, squeaky clean, straight-A-getting coeds (you knew some, didn’t you?) and me, all of us around a rectangular table. Special, hastily-called seminar on modern American poetry and literature with special focus on beatniks - with Ginsberg and Orlovsky in attendance.

The guy leading the seminar led us through the usual academic rigmarole where we all pretend to know what we’re talking about. Honestly, I didn’t know a hell of a lot about the Beats at the time – still fascinated with and kinda stuck in, the 18th century. I was slow coming up to modern literary speed. So, I was mostly mum. And I only came close to blowing my coffee all over the standard-collegiate-issue-non-athletic-department light oak conference table one time that morning.

The almost spirited discussion had bounced around, Kerouac, Corso, William Carlos Williams, Ferlinghetti, Burroughs, nothing one would not expect. We Howled a little. Place in the American literature canon, social significance, blah, blah, blah. When our leader, seminar that is, turned to Peter, who had also been relatively quiet – oh, except when we were discussing the lyrics to Dylan’s Mr., Tambourine Man, he waxed moderately eloquent about the “take me disappearing through the smokerings of my mind” line – asked if he had anything to add about Burroughs, about whom Ginsberg had just been expostulating. He looked down, thought a minute, lifted his eyes and his face brightened and said, “Yeah, he can’t have an orgasm unless you fuck him in the ass.”

Have you ever been a room with a bunch of people where it was really quiet? You can hear breathing? Have you seen those cartoons where a character’s tongue and jaw drop to the floor when they are totally surprised by something? I swear two of the inevitably A-getting coeds panties bounced off their knee socks with a cartoonish boing before they retreated to the netherworld of the plaid-skirted confluence of their ivory thighs. Okay I don’t really know for sure about the ivory part. It actually got hotter in the room from the heat generated by the red faces. I thought I was going to choke stifling my laughter. I couldn’t look at Gerry Rabkin as I knew he would be in the same state. He was a savvy Brooklynite, Ohio State grad who taught history of film and protest drama. And was doing some research (yeah, right) at The Kinsey Institute.

Let’s skip the rest of the week, okay? Some other stuff did happen. Denis and I cooked a Greek meal etc. I had a cameo in an art film where I sat in the middle of the room on the floor – in the room where I slept at Denis’ - and a naked belly dancer with flame-red pubic hair – waving at my eye level - danced around me, to Middle Eastern music she had brought with her, while I read the Marquis de Sade and ignored her. We had to shoot that ignoring part a few times. Usual 60’s stuff.

We’re at Gerry and Joan Rabkin’s place. Last party of the week. Joan was a good barber and usually cut my hair. Somewhere around mid party we were in their bedroom and she was cutting my hair. A bunch of folks were in there with us. Amiable moderately drunken party rapping transpiring as she snipped. She said she was finished in her spiffy British accent, and I was ready to get up when Peter came in the room and said, “Joan, aren’t you going to shave his neck? Nevermind, I will.” He returned from the bathroom, next room over, with some shaving cream and a razor and a towel.

“Take your shirt off.” I did. He lathered me up and began shaving. One of those bizarre coincidences occurred that I’m sure you’ve all experienced. All of a sudden, it was just the two of us in the room. Peter and me. Strangely, everyone had drifted away to something they thought more interesting than watching a haircut. Last person out of the room had closed the door. Peter was wrapping up and wiping me down with a towel when the door burst open. Ginsberg!

I was half-naked and Peter was abluting me. Had an uneasy feeling about the upshot of this. Have you ever had someone really say “AHA!” to you? I hadn’t either. Until then. He slammed the door behind him as he left.

Oh, no, we ain’t done yet. An hour or so elapsed, party time, so who knows how long it really was.

I had to pee. Knocked on the bathroom door. Voice said for me to come in. I did.

Julius was on the porcelain throne, suit pants and shorts around his ankles. Peter was bending over him, counseling him to take a dump. Apparently Julius was somewhat…er… defecation challenged and needed to be coaxed to perform in an acceptable location like, say, for instance, a toilet. He was recalcitrant. Peter asked if I would help him in his exhortations. Hey, I’m a team player! I sat down on the edge of the bathtub and we began cheering and encouraging evacuation. Clapping of hands and words of sustenance.

Door to the bathroom flew open. Ginsberg.

Damn, this was the only two- “Aha!” night of my entire life! Another door slam.

More party elapsed. Some folks asked Suzan and me to do some songs. We were all in a circle on the living room floor, maybe a dozen of us. Suzan singing and me playing and singing harmony.

Ginsberg had been paying particular attention to Suzan. Gosh, I wonder why. He was sitting between us on the floor. Never turned to me. Clapped wildly when she would finish a song and embraced her. Once told me to shut up when I was singing harmony as he couldn’t hear her. About an hour of this stuff. Finally, Ginsberg finally turned to me and said. “Someone told me you are a writer. Tell me what you write.” I was somewhat taken aback. When I was young and even stupider than I am now, I had this conviction that I could not talk about something while I was working on it or I would never finish it. I told him that. Told him the name of what I was working on - Prometheus Rebound- and that it was an absurd novelette and said that was all I was going to say. He said something like – I’m not really sure – “Pah!” He stood up and went and got Peter. They said their good-byes to everyone in the room but me. Oh, Peter did wave at me. Closed the door behind them and left.

Door burst open…a few words, door slammed, loop tape.

Okay, I got that off my chest, next entry, food, I promise!


Edited by ChefCarey (log)

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Okay, my short-lived English major fugue is over. What happened?

Back to food. I worked in bars and pizza joints in Bloomington, Indiana where I attended Indiana University for the next few years.

My bartending gig was in the closest bar to the Indiana University campus, Nick’s English Hut. Never not busy. Hit the bar mats running when I came through the front door. I had the fortune to work with Nick’s most famous employee, Ruthie. Ruthie was ruthless. There was a definite schism in Bloomington, there were the students and faculty and then there were the "Stonecutters" or "Stonies." Read, locals. Ruthie was definitely a Stonie. (For more elaboration on this topic I refer you to the film Breaking Away. Although, he calls them "Cutters" in the film. We went swimming in those same stripper pits.) Those of us who were not members of fraternities or sororities, by choice, and were moderately politically aware, were torn. Liberal arts majors all. We thought we understood the locals (a pretentious proletarian conceit, as I now know) and sympathized with them. We named our Quiz Bowl team "Town X." One of the members of our four-man team, John Crowley went on to become a well-respected fantasy writer and another a congressman from Indiana. Oh, yeah, and one went on to become a cook. We kicked ass and won – the final score was something like 380 to 40. Beat a fraternity. (The guy who wrote the screenplay for Breaking Away said he based his idea on our Quiz Bowl team -four man team from town kicking a fraternity’s ass. He just substituted bicycles for brains. And switched venues, substituting The Little 500 in Memorial Stadium for the auditorium where the Quiz Bowl competition was held.)

She was legendary, Ruthie was, literally for decades. In that era we sold beer. And more beer. No liquor. Notice I didn’t mention what kind of fortune. Ruthie was a mixed bag, if she liked you and you were 21, no problem. All those under 21 were the enemy. Craggy, careworn features, bowed back, tremors and a walker would not prevent her from asking for your ID. The owner paid her by the piece for false ID’s. She once got stuck under a booth going for a quarter on the floor and it took one of us on either leg to pull her out. She was a munchkin, could barely see over the bar as she called out for "Two Schlitz, three Pabst and a large cheese." The bartender had to call the pizza orders in. I schlepped oceans of beer, attended most of my classes and was probably the last person on the planet to find out John F. Kennedy had been shot on November 22, 1963. I was taking a make-up exam in modern American literature, alone, in a professor’s office most of the afternoon. I came out of that office and the world had changed.

There was a pizza joint up the street owned by the same guy that owned Nicks. There was no kitchen in Nick’s, so we served their pizzas. I became friends with the manager and learned how to make pizzas and ride horses (he was into horses) yet a couple of other vastly underrated skills. One year a bunch of us hopped in the manager's van and headed up to Indianapolis to watch the Indy 500 qualifying. It was very hot for May. We were traveling light - just a garbage can full of iced beer and a sack full of (canned) salmon salad sandwiches one of the guys mothers had been kind enough to make for us. Parked in the infield and wandered around watching cars drive fast. After a few hours of beer-drinking in the hot sun we were starving, so I retrieved the sandwiches from the van and we all wolfed them down. After all they'd only been in the back of the van in 90 degree plus heat with no refrigeration for a mere few hours. Yep, you got it. A bacteriologist could not have done a better job had he set up perfect laboratory conditions to develop as many strains of food borne illness as possible. The resulting broad spectrum of mass technicolor yawns was truly awe inspiring. We all survived.

I still remember the pizza place as having the best American-style sausage pizza I’ve ever had. I still make a version of it today. My kids loved it growing up. I use about a pound each of Italian sausage and fresh mozzarella (buffalo if I have it) and fresh tomato sauce on each pizza. Maybe a little provolone and Parmigiano-Reggiano, along with some fresh basil leaves. That’s it. At the pizza joint, several full-size, industrial strength, banded, roasting pans of ground pork and spices went in the ovens early every morning to become Italian sausage. The meat, not the pans, but you knew that. They could smell it up the block at Nick’s. Undoubtedly sold some pizzas.

Oh, no, this pizza is nothing like those specified in the petition to the Italian Ministry of Agriculture from the Genuine Pizza Napoletana and Pizza Napoletana Associations of Naples in Articles 1-13 of EEC Regulation 2082/92 in May of 2004. (In case you were wondering and about to point that out to me.) Nor does it resemble the thin-crusted New York classic or the cornucopic Chicago concoctions. Both of which I love, by the bye.

This is strictly, stick-to-the-ribs and, whatever else is handy, American grub. About two inches thick.

I still make a mean pizza. And a couple of relatively tame ones, too. I can also deliver a mean pizza - just not as far as I used to - as that was another of my collegiate jobs. Don’t like riding mean horses. My first wife, Suzan was quite a horsewoman, though. She actually won the Arabian costume class at the Grand Nationals at the Cow Palace one year. Today, she and her husband live near Lodi and raise and show quarter horses. More on Suzan in installment two when our antihero arrives in California.

Right after I graduated in 1966, I was drafted. Two years in the army and a year in Vietnam brings us to…or almost to, The Ordinary. Stay tuned...

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I'm gone for one day, and all this good stuff happens.  Frrrrrumph.  And Hooray.

You touched a lot of memories for me, down to the casket company, which our little town had as well, though none of our family ever worked there.  And we're right close to Richmond---close enough to run over for dinner---wish I'd known about Miller's before now.  We just went to Hagerstown for a birthday dinner at Weliver's last week---it's the "destination place" now for home-cooking.  (Scalloped cabbage and watermelon pickles--MMMMM).

I, too, received my first potload of books in a dubious fashion, though the gift outweighed by tons any transgressions of the giver.  I just know they set me on my path of voracious reading, and I'll never fail to bless her for that.

And once, through NO fault of my fastidious, clean-living Mammaw, her no-account sister took me on a Sunday-morning cash collection at her own nefarious establishment.    I was four, and didn't know any better than to talk about the pretty ladies and their beautiful, silky nightgowns when I got home.  This and other clues tell me that we have a similar background in a lot of ways, though separated by a lotta geography.  Looking forward to any and all installments---You gotta love a man with such a checkered past.

rachel

PS---It's a One-Eyed Sandwich.

Maybe you can help me out here...I've been racking what's left of my brain trying to remember the name of a joint, a bar/restaurant. Right acrosss the state line, in New Paris, Ohio. I went there with my stepfather's family on a few occasions and I took the cheerleader there because minors (under 21, but over 18) could buy 3.2 beer. I even remember hearing Connie Francis on the jukebox singing "Where the Boys Are." Is it still there? Do you have a clue what I'm talking about?

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A whorehouse, baby caskets and Ginsberg in the same story, now that's writing.

I spent a Month one weekend at the Indy 500. 13 guys 27 cases and one keg of beer in an RV. Somehow we ended up with a naked mannequin and getting chased through the streets by a really drunk guy with a gun.

The race and inflied were amazing. Gotta love naptown!

Frog Eyes are called gashouse eggs up in my neck of the woods.

Since I mentioned food that means you get to write about anything you want for a while right?

Whatever you do don't stop, you have us all waiting for the next installment.


**************************************************

Ah, it's been way too long since I did a butt. - Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

--------------------

One summers evening drunk to hell, I sat there nearly lifeless…Warren

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A whorehouse, baby caskets and Ginsberg in the same story, now that's writing.

I spent a Month one weekend at the Indy 500. 13 guys 27 cases and one keg of beer in an RV. Somehow we ended up with a naked mannequin and getting chased through the streets by a really drunk guy with a gun.

The race and inflied were amazing. Gotta love naptown!

Frog Eyes are called gashouse eggs up in my neck of the woods.

Since I mentioned food that means you get to write about anything you want for a while right?

Whatever you do don't stop, you have us all waiting for the next installment.

Thanks for waiting. :biggrin:

Would that I could give free rein to my febrile (feeble?) ranting. I inked a legally binding, ironclad, pleated, and neatly hemmed document indicating I would include at least one ort per paragraph. So, my writing here will be much more ortful in future.

Future fulminations, though, will, include misadventures in Paris, Berkley, Chicago, San Francisco and culminate in - tada - Oakland.


Edited by ChefCarey (log)

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a delectably unconventional tale. i look forward to more.

and it's totaly a Toad in the hole.


"They tried to stay in from the cold and the wind making love and making their dinner" - Fiest

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It may be totally Toad in the Hole where you are but in the southern San Joaquin Valley (California) in the early '50's, it was Egg-In-The-Middle-Of-The-Toast. Thanks Mom!

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It may be totally Toad in the Hole where you are but in the southern San Joaquin Valley (California) in the early '50's, it was Egg-In-The-Middle-Of-The-Toast.  Thanks Mom!

Speaking of which...what the hell ever happened to soft boiled eggs? I remember cups, cutters and all kinds of gear to deal with them. At least two or three days a week this was what my mother made me for breakfast. She was a definite believer in breaking the fast, fast. She worked and was always running behind. Can't get a much quicker fastbreaker than a three-minute egg or two...

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I'm gone for one day, and all this good stuff happens.   Frrrrrumph.   And Hooray.

You touched a lot of memories for me, down to the casket company, which our little town had as well, though none of our family ever worked there.   And we're right close to Richmond---close enough to run over for dinner---wish I'd known about Miller's before now.   We just went to Hagerstown for a birthday dinner at Weliver's last week---it's the "destination place" now for home-cooking.  (Scalloped cabbage and watermelon pickles--MMMMM).

I, too, received my first potload of books in a dubious fashion, though the gift outweighed by tons any transgressions of the giver.   I just know they set me on my path of voracious reading, and I'll never fail to bless her for that.

And once, through NO fault of my fastidious, clean-living Mammaw, her no-account sister took me on a Sunday-morning cash collection at her own nefarious establishment.    I was four, and didn't know any better than to talk about the pretty ladies and their beautiful, silky nightgowns when I got home.   This and other clues tell me that we have a similar background in a lot of ways, though separated by a lotta geography.  Looking forward to any and all installments---You gotta love a man with such a checkered past.

rachel

PS---It's a One-Eyed Sandwich.

Maybe you can help me out here...I've been racking what's left of my brain trying to remember the name of a joint, a bar/restaurant. Right acrosss the state line, in New Paris, Ohio. I went there with my stepfather's family on a few occasions and I took the cheerleader there because minors (under 21, but over 18) could buy 3.2 beer. I even remember hearing Connie Francis on the jukebox singing "Where the Boys Are." Is it still there? Do you have a clue what I'm talking about?

Eureka! I found it!

It was called the Lampost!

Here is a brief excerpt from a review of it's new incarnation as a barbecue joint:

But most of his attention will be focused on sustaining and building the clientele that have visited the restaurant on the south edge of New Paris that has been around since 1945.

Joe DiFederico, Uncle Joe to most, started it. The name was held through subsequent owners because of the business that built up over the years and the special spaghetti sauce and 3.2 beer.

Generations of 18-year-old Hoosiers slipped across the state line to quaff some 3.2 beer, a less potent beer that was at one time available to people at age 18, three years before they were allowed the sample a sip of sin in their home state.

During those teenage years, DiFederico's Lampost was the place they came if they had a date. It was a more upscale than most of the smoky bars that catered to the interstate bar business. Baumbach's place is smoke free.

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