Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

The Supreme eG Baking and Pastry Challenge (#2)


Recommended Posts

What about starting with the idea of mincemeat, but then sort of extrapolating the flavours? Cured bison with a nut, apples, dried fruit, and spice compote?

Cutting the lemon/the knife/leaves a little cathedral:/alcoves unguessed by the eye/that open acidulous glass/to the light; topazes/riding the droplets,/altars,/aromatic facades. - Ode to a Lemon, Pablo Neruda

Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched the video linked off of the Macaroon thread. :biggrin:

What about doing something like that? Savory Macaroons with onion confit and pork cracklings instead of buttercream. Or a savory cookie?

Enjoy this and the last thread alot- alternating between being totally grossed out (sweet haggis?! :wacko: ) , missing food from home (The bak kwa/sweet pork jerky), but being extremely amused and inspired by the process of thought/filtering all the information.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I'm awake now and can unequivocablly say that I will not ask anybody to suck the dessert out of a pig snout. S_Sevilla seems to be channeling my thoughts right now. All of these ideas are really great and I can't wait to make a decision...however, last night I got to make a greek cookie for a friend (I'll post in the dessert thread later), and tonight I have my bubble drink party - and there's still that cheese bust I need to carve. I'm also heading down to Deming today (1 hour south) to go to my carneceria for the suet in case I happen to use it.

I will also say that the backroom drama is much more intriguing than what the masses read on this thread. You would be surprised how many PMs have hit my box with secret tips, hidden secrets, and dirty gossip. Shame on you Ling...I never knew you were like that! :blink:

Link to post
Share on other sites
I wonder if you could do some kind of sweet-ish stuffed animal stomach, a la haggis....
Or dessert sausage. Maybe with mushrooms? Served with rice pudding? Shaved white chocolate on top to look like Parm

]]Puke[[

oh man that hurt. Though I do like the breakfast sausage idea, maybe not like that though.

Hey, I'm just throwing them out there. Maybe one will stick.

What about the eskimo treat of seal fat mixed with berries? Can you get to a couple of seals where you are?

I in no way support the use of whale in this manner, but I went to a specialty ice cream shop in japan and they actually did have a whale flavored ice cream........."scientific whaling" my ass.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not ignoring these suggestions - all very helpful, but I'm in the middle of boiling my bubbles for tonight. I had a very successful trip to my butcher. Now I've got a team of carniceriadors (I may have made that word up) rooting for me in Spanish. I have paper thin beef steaks, and my kidney fat...I haven't made up my mind but its coming together.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ohh I am so glad I wount be the one have to taste these things :wacko::blink::raz: Way to much mixing for my taste , other than usual ingredients other animal parts no thanks :rolleyes:

By the way there is one italian cake or well I dont know what to call it , but its called "Sanguinaccio" and its made with pig blood ( you know they used to use everything out of pork ).Blahhhh

Good luck gfron1, waiting for the pics :shock:

Vanessa

Link to post
Share on other sites

It sounds more like people are trying to convert pastry ideals to the savory side. I think some of you are a little confused. The idea is not to make a pastry thing savory, its to make a savory thing pastry.

It's really not even that, its specifically taking something that we all have confined in our mind as a staple substance of protein from living interactive creatures that has, over time, become a necsessity to our mind and body. Dessert is an off breed to the dinner meal, something that doesn't contain the bulk of our nutrition. Even vegetables are a little wierd in dessert because we think of them as a need, not a desire. Fruit is gods candy that has been given to us, so it makes sense why its is used predominately in dessert.

To accomplish this goal/challenge we have to think of the flesh of an animal not as sustinence or a provision but as an under appreciated, less-consumed entity to our bodies and minds.

If everyone can focus on finding a way to turn delicious, rewarding, and fullfilling flesh into provocative, exotic, out-of-reach attraction, then maybe we can find a way to turn this into a dessert.

Sorry if my statement seems a bit promiscuous.

Edited by chiantiglace (log)

Dean Anthony Anderson

"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This

Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

Link to post
Share on other sites
It sounds more like people are trying to convert pastry ideals to the savory side.  I think some of you are a little confused.  The idea is not to make a pastry thing savory, its to make a savory thing pastry. 

It's really not even that, its specifically taking something that we all have confined in our mind as a staple substance of protein from living interactive creatures that has, over time, become a necsessity to our mind and body.  Dessert is an off breed to the dinner meal, something that doesn't contain the bulk of our nutrition.  Even vegetables are a little wierd in dessert because we think of them as a need, not a desire.  Fruit is gods candy that has been given to us, so it makes sense why its is used predominately in dessert.

To accomplish this goal/challenge we have to think of the flesh of an animal not as sustinence or a provision but as an under appreciated, less-consumed entity to our bodies and minds.

If everyone can focus on finding a way to turn delicious, rewarding, and fullfilling flesh into provocative, exotic, out-of-reach attraction, then maybe we can find a way to turn this into a dessert.

Sorry if my statement seems a bit promiscuous.

This brings up an interesting revelation I had....We oven dried some really nice, sweet early girl tomatoes until they were nice and crispy. As I was snacking on them and some strawberries, I realized, holy crap, these things taste a lot like strawberries, then I remembered seeing a pastry here somewhere where someone did make a pate de fruit out of tomatoes.......

I'm really interested in seeing what's created, it seems like the dessert has already found its course....now to just sit back and wait.

Link to post
Share on other sites

So here's the lay of the land...

Yes, the course feels set to me as well, however, I have two days of utter madness in my life - that damn cheese bust is going to be the death of me! So, I hope you all keep sharing ideas, because two days is a long time in my mind. I've switched my brain from "what should I do?" to "can I pull off this technique?" So, I'll be rushing around until Sunday trying to figure this out - as the light bulbs turn on...please share because I may toss it all out and start from scratch.

Tonight, however, was our bubble drink party. The fact that we had a bubble drink party should tell you how rural we are. We are about 3-5 years behind the coasts. I'm going to get posting the pics in the dinner thread.

NOTE: For the record, no dirty gossip was shared with me about Ling as I alluded to previously...Ling has accrued celebrity status among eGulleters, and so she has become a target of jabs and jokes. All in good fun :)

Edited by gfron1 (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites

Good morning all. Two things came up whilst sleeping...

1. I've heard that tamale masa should be bought premixed (wet) for a good tamale maker (which we have plenty of around here) because its more refined than buying the bagged powder. Anyone know anything about this? The only reason this causes concern was that I was going to rub lemon (or orange) zest into sugar, and then incorporate that into masa before mixing....if its already wet, that may not work as well.

2. I have 6 paper thin sheets of meat (cut against the grain). My plan was to take lengthwise cuts of pineapple, layer them with the meat and brown sugar, and let the acids cook them a bit. Then I was going to try three cooking methods for the meat - 1. a dehydrator, 2. in a skillet with butter, 3. in the oven between two baking sheets on a low temperature.

My goal is to have the meat be very delicate and break off as soon as its touched. I assume that when I pull the meat from whatever cooking process, that it will be soft, but as it dries in the air, it will become delicate. As a side note, we rarely have rain here, so the humidity is generally very, very low, but we have a rainstorm coming in for the next 2-3 days - that may effect the drying.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Your plan may enounter difficulties since the bromelin in the pineapple, unless deactivated by heat, will eat the meat and you will be left with a sloppy mush. I'm not sure if this is your intention:

Steak, before and after 3 hours in contact with raw pineapple:

i4476.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think someone else also mentioned pork or chicken cracklings. If you think of bacon candy or dessert combinations that can handle a salty component that may lead you to some ideas.

The proscuitto/melon redux idea was already mentioned. It may be difficult for you to find down there, but along the lines of what you were thinking of with thin slices of dried beef would be the use of thinly sliced Bundnerfleisch (German) or Bresaola (Italian). I could see these working with some fruit and/or cheese combinations.

Other savory/sweet combinations that work and that might be amenable to manipulation more towards the dessert sphere:

Chinese Spicy Orange Beef and caramelized savory Vietnamse dishes.

I have some ideas for followup on these ideas but want to leave you some creative room. :smile:

Maybe with your busy schedule you could get a dispensation for a few extra days...

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's something I've been working over for the last few months:

Bone Marrow Ice-Cream. Roast a whole bunch of bone marrow bones a la Fergus Henderson and then just churn like a normal ice-cream except with less cream to even out the fat content and less sugar. drizzle a little parsley "coulis" and garnish with a caramel glazed chicken skin for the crunch. Maybe serve with a mincemeat pie.

PS: I am a guy.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Jackal10 beat me to it with the dissolving meat problem. (that's one hell of a 100-words picture!)

Why not sub another acid fruit? Lemon / orange / kumquat wont have the same discomforting effect as raw pineapple. The only two fruits that dissolve meat are pineapple and papaya (to the best of my knowledge).

Citrus is used to "cook" ceviche.

Or you might have some wicked sour local berries that would do the trick.

Or, cook the pineapple long enough to inactivate the enzyme.

Edited by Kouign Aman (log)

"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't tell you how much I appreciated the pineapple warning - you learn something new everyday don't ya :)

Today I was knocked out by a cold...the good news is that I can skip work tomorrow and focus on the cheese bust. I also struck it rich with a friend who lived in Mexico for 15 years and helped me tweak the masa recipe.

Hang in there everyone - and keep the ideas (and warnings) coming. Its almost time.

Link to post
Share on other sites
The proscuitto/melon redux idea was already mentioned. 

Yikes-- I'm scared of some of the ideas here. However, reworking prosciutto/melon sounds like it has possibilities. What if you infused the proscuitto flavor into a bavarian/mousse (easy on the sugar)? Perhaps this would create a pleasing foie gras like richness. Then layer it with a melon gelée?

Chris Sadler

Link to post
Share on other sites
I could use some assistance from our sugar people...

I want to create a sugar thread that is shaped like a spring.  When i do threaded sugar I can't seem to get a continuous thread beyond a few inches.  How are those made?

You need to get a small piece of pulled sugar nice and hot. Pinch off a small piece and carefully drag it away from the sugar using your first two fingers from your other hand to gentle rub underneath the "thread" or "ribbon" helping to release more from the block.

Once you sucsessfully made a long enough thread, take the thread and wave it infront of a hot oven or surface to make it malleable. Once the sugar starts to drupe andsoften start to corkscrew it with your fingers. You can also wrap it around a dowel or similar cylinder and let it harden like that.

Dean Anthony Anderson

"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This

Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Similar Content

    • By Deeps
      This is one of my daughter favorite dishes, being mild and less spicy she loves this rice dish.  Its super easy to make and goes well with most Indian curries.
      Do try this out and I am sure you will be happy with the results.
       

       
      Prep Time : 5 mins
      Cook Time: 5 mins
      Serves: 2
       
      Ingredients:
      1 cup rice(basmati), cooked
      1/2 cup coconut, shredded or grated
      1 green chili, slit
      1 dried red chili
      1 1/2 tablespoon oil/ghee(clarified butter)
      1/2 teaspoon mustard seeds
      1/2 teaspoon cumin seeds
      1/2 tablespoon chana dal(split chickpeas)
      1/2 tablespoon urad dal(split black gram)
      1 teaspoon ginger, finely chopped
      A pinch of hing (asafoetida)
      Few curry leaves
      Salt to taste
       
      Directions
      1) Heat oil/ghee(clarified butter) in a pan in medium flame. I used coconut oil here because it tastes best for this dish.
      2) Add mustard seeds, cumin seeds, chana dal(split chickpeas), urad dal(split black gram), green chili, dried red chili, ginger and curry leaves. Fry this for 30 seconds in medium flame. The trick is to ensure that these are fried but not burned.
      3) Add a pinch of hing(asafoetida) and mix well.
      4) Now add the cooked rice and coconut. Stir well for about 15 to 20 seconds and switch off the flame.
      5) Finally add salt into this and mix well. You could add peanuts or cashew nuts if you prefer. Goes well with most curries.
    • By loki
      Vietnamese Pickled Eggplant
       
      These use tiny white eggplants that are nearly impossible to get here.  I tried to grow them without success (this time).  I did not have these so used unripe cherry tomatoes.
       
      Ingredients
      2 lb eggplant (tiny white SE Asian types) or green cherry tomatoes.
      1/4 cup salt
      1 TBL galangal root
      1 TBL ginger root
      12 green chilies - thai peppers or serranos
      6 cloves garlic
      1/2 cup onion finely chopped
      2 cup Granulated sugar
      2 cup water
      1/4 cup fish sauce
       
      1. Rinse off eggplant and pierce with a knife - or cut in half if larger than 3/4 inch in diameter.
       
      2. Put eggplant into jar and add salt - and water to top of jar.  Cover with plastic lid and cover loosely.  Let ferment for 7 days.
       
      3. Take out eggplant and drain.  Rinse with water.  Put into jars again.
       
      4. Chop ginger, galangal, chiles, onion, and garlic.
       
      5. Boil water and sugar, add spices and onion, and heat for 5 minutes.  Add fish sauce.
       
      6. Pour over eggplants making sure the spices and onion get all around (might have to take out some eggplant and return).
       
      7. Cover with plastic lid, and refrigerate.
       
      8. Ready in several days.  Will last a very long time in the refrigerator.
       
      Notes:  Good alongside other SE Asian dishes, or even alone with rice.  The green tomatoes are not the same texture as the eggplants, but are quite good.  The eggplants are very crispy.
       
    • By Kasia
      Courgette cutlets
       
      I found the recipe for courgette cutlets at www.gotujzcukiereczkiem.pl. It appealed to me at once for three reasons. Firstly, the courgette is my favourite vegetable. Secondly, cutlets, pancakes and crumpets are my children's favourites dishes. Thirdly, this dish is fast, simple and is always a success. You must not use FB while frying, because it may end with you ordering pizza for dinner 

      The cutlets are mild and their flavour is spiced up with feta cheese. You can complement them with your favourite herbs. In my kitchen there is always basil, dill, peppermint, rosemary and thyme. This time I chose dill (in accordance with the recipe) and thyme.

      Ingredients:
      400g of courgette
      1 egg
      150g of feta cheese
      110g of breadcrumbs (+ 4 tablespoons for the batter)
      2 tablespoons of minced dill
      1 tablespoon of thyme
      salt and pepper

      Wash the courgette and grate it. Add salt and leave it in a bowl for 15 minutes. Drain it then mix in the egg, feta cheese, breadcrumbs and herbs. Spice it up with salt and pepper. Make small cutlets with the mixture and fry in oil. Serve with natural yoghurt.
       
       

    • By Kasia
      Creamy soup with broad beans
       
      During my last visit to the fruit and vegetable market I bought so many broad beans that I didn't want to risk cooking everything at once. I prepared a rich, creamy soup with them. The green soup, served with a bit of thick yoghurt and nigella, was very tasty.
       
      Ingredients (for 5 people):
      1 kg of broad beans
      half an onion
      1 clove of garlic
      1 tablespoon of butter
      4 sprigs of thyme
      1 tablespoon of caraway seeds
      vegetable stock
      5 teaspoons of thick natural yoghurt
      2 teaspoons of nigella
      2 tablespoons of sunflowers seeds
      salt and pepper

      Cook the broad beans in salty water with the caraway seeds, drain and peel them. Try not to eat everything. Chop the onion and garlic and fry them in butter. Put the peeled broad beans, onion, garlic and sprigs of thyme into a saucepan. Pour in the vegetable stock to cover the vegetables and boil for 10 minutes. Take out the thyme and blend the soup to make a smooth cream. Add vegetable stock until you have the right consistence. Roast the sunflower seeds in a dry pan. Serve the soup with thick natural yoghurt, nigella and sunflower seeds.

      Enjoy your meal!
       
       

    • By Richie111
      Deep Fried Kimchee
      Basically a deep fried pickle with an exotic twist. The preparation of the dish greatly reduces the pungency of the kimchee making it a tasty way to introduce this Korean staple to reluctant adults or children alike. Easy to make by following the directions below, or check out the video <a href="
      To Deep Fry Kimchee</a><br>

      1 qt peanut oil*
      2 c kimchee (most common variety - spicy<i> baechu</i>, or Napa cabbage)
      1/2 c all-purpose flour (for <i>pre- egg wash</i>)

      Egg Wash
      2 eggs
      1/2 c milk
      1/4 c buttermilk
      1/4 c kimchee juice**
      1 tsp cayenne pepper

      Breading Mixture
      1/2 c seasoned bread crumbs***
      1/4 c corn meal
      1/4 c all purpose flour
      2 tsp cayenne pepper
      1 tsp lemon pepper
      1 tsp Korean red pepper

      Kimchee Ranch Dressing
      3/4 c Ranch dressing
      3 T kimchee juice
      1 tsp Korean red pepper

      * Can substitute Canola or other oil. Amount may vary depending upon size of pot used.
      **Kimchee juice is the excess liquid in the kimchee jar
      ***Seasoned Bread Crumbs - Use store bought or make from scratch by blending following ingredients until fine: 4 ounces Italian bread, cubed and baked at 400°F for 12 minutes, 1 tsp garlic powder, 1 tsp onion powder, 1 tsp dried parsley flakes, 1 tbsp grated parmesan cheese.
      <br>
      1. Heat oil to 375°F in pot or deepfryer
      2. Remove thin, leafy green parts of kimchee and cut firmer white portions into approximately 1 inch squares
      3. Combine 3 tbsp kimchee juice and Korean red pepper with Ranch Dressing. Refrigerate.
      4. Beat eggs and combine ingredients for <i>Egg Wash</i> in bowl
      5. Combine ingredients for <i>Breading Mixture</i> in bowl.
      6. Bread each kimchee square:
      <p style=" text-indent:15px; ">a. first coat in <i>pre- egg wash</i> flour</p>
      <p style=" text-indent:15px; ">b. dip in <i>Egg Wash</i></p>
      <p style=" text-indent:15px; ">c. coat with <i>Breading Mixture</i> thoroughly</p>
      <p style=" text-indent:15px; ">d. set aside each breaded kimchee square on a wax paper covered dish
      7. Carefully add kimchee squares to hot oil in batches of 4-6 pieces.
      8. Remove when golden brown - approximately 25-35 seconds. Place on paper towel lined plate. Lightly season with a touch of salt.
      9. Allow to cool approximately one minute.
      10. Garnish with Korean red pepper and serve with Kimchee Ranch Dressing
      Keywords: Appetizer, Vegetables, Korean, American, Vegetarian, Deep Fryer, Easy
      ( RG2155 )
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...