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Vancouver/Western Canada Ingredient Sources Topic


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Spring is here and I am wondering where to find some local spring produce.  I went to the farmers market at Trout lake last weekend and picked up some mushrooms and greens, but I missed the rhubarb and didn't see the usual spring suspects - asparagus and fiddleheads.  Where to go during the week to pick up?

Thanks!

Save-On Foods has these also, mind you, they are prepacked in a styro bowl, overwrapped with saran.

"If cookin' with tabasco makes me white trash, I don't wanna be recycled."

courtesy of jsolomon

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  • 1 month later...

^Oooo...Epoisses...smells like feet, tastes like heaven. Sadly I only know where to get it in Seattle.

Does anyone know where I can get fancy jam/preserves jars, of the sort that Bonne Maman uses?

Don't try to win over the haters. You're not the jackass whisperer."

Scott Stratten

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No, the Epoisses in Seattle isn't raw milk, unfortunately. I believe the Epoisses sold in the US is thermalized (as opposed to pasteurized.) I'm looking for raw milk Epoisses (produced by Laiterie de la Côte or Ferme des Marronniers.)

And while I'm at it, is there a chance someone has come across Cremerie Classique butter in Vancouver? I think it's produced in Oregon, but I haven't been able to find it in Seattle (so it's probably more of a stretch that I'll find it here.) It's the best butter I've ever tasted...it has a milky sweetness that's so different from Plugra.

Edited by Ling (log)
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Okay - since we are throwing out dairy wish lists - I would kill (literally - you can contract me for murder) for a Vancouver source or producer of Burrata - the freshest creamiest most insanely delilcous mozz f-king ever!

Lark and Zoe have served it in Seattle - and their sources are in Oregon and California. Is it too much to ask for some in Vancouver? Really - you want some killed - send me some burrata - we can carry this conversation on via PM's

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Okay - since we are throwing out dairy wish lists - I would kill (literally - you can contract me for murder) for a Vancouver source or producer of Burrata - the freshest creamiest most insanely delilcous mozz f-king ever! 

Lark and Zoe have served it in Seattle - and their sources are in Oregon and California.  Is it too much to ask for some in Vancouver?  Really - you want some killed - send me some burrata - we can carry this conversation on via PM's

Before you can have a great Burrata you need great fresh mozzarella and before that great milk. The best fresh mozzarella in Vancouver is still Scardillo but it is less good than a few years ago. Even then it was good, not great, although light years ahead of the Tre Stelle rubber balls.

In this case I don't know if it comes down to a dairy board situation or just the lack of a good artisan cheese maker who focuses on Italian style cheese. It would be interesting to find out.

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To answer your dairy questions:

1. We sell two types of Epoisses at les amis du FROMAGE. Fromagerie Berthaut uses Thermized milk for their cheese. Even thought it is not made from raw milk, it is still a very flavorful cheese. Many customers prefer it.

Some cheesemakers use a compromise between raw and Pasteurized, called thermization. This involves heating the milk at lower temperatures (145-149F for 15 sec.) than the Pasteur method (which requires 160F for 15 sec or 145F for 30 min.) Thermizing kills most bacteria, but preserves more of the original flavor than true Pasteurization.

The other brand is Jean Gaugry, which is made from unpasteurized milk.

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2. To the best of my knowledge, you may not commercially import butter into Canada. I beleive this law is in place to protect canadian dairy farmers.

3. Fresh/youg style cheeses are difficult to to import to canada. They are fragile, and they have to be shipped by air in stead of the usual boat, which increases shipping costs dramatically. Add to the fact that Vancouver is the lats stop on the trip. They usually have a very short shelf life. This is a good reason for you to go back and visit Italy.

You may see some of these dairy products across the border, but you are in a different country with different trade laws. Canadian trade laws do not apply here, and we also have a different food inspection regulations (and vice-versa). This is why you see the good epoisses here.

Joe Chaput

les amis du FROMAGE

www.buycheese.com

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^Oooo...Epoisses...smells like feet, tastes like heaven.

I thought I'd read that phrase somewhere before! (End 2nd paragraph.)

Anyway, this is not a Where To Find question as I know it is available from Les Amis, but in the cheese vein I tried the white truffle chevre from Saltspring Island last weekend and it was outstanding. Experimented with it in a salad and with potatoes. I don't usually like goats cheeses, but I really loved the smooth texture and flavour of this one.

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  • 2 weeks later...

And while I'm at it, is there a chance someone has come across Cremerie Classique butter in Vancouver? I think it's produced in Oregon, but I haven't been able to find it in Seattle (so it's probably more of a stretch that I'll find it here.) It's the best butter I've ever tasted...it has a milky sweetness that's so different from Plugra.

Yup, quoting myself. Just in case anyone else might be on the lookout for this butter, I found it today at Pike Place in the little market behind Frank's Produce that sells eggs. And the best part is the butter is only $4.10US a pound--a lot cheaper than the Vermont Butter & Cheese stuff we've been buying. There's a sticker on the Cremerie Classique package that says it won 1st place in a taste test in San Fran too.

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Last year I recall someone asking where one can buy tart rings. I can't seem to find the particular thread via search. I checked with a few places in town and they don't seem to have them. Last time I saw them I was in Steveston but prefer not to drive that far just for tart rings. Surely, there must be a place to get them in Vancouver or nearby.

I'm looking for an approximate size of 1/2 inch height by 4 inch diameter, preferable stainless steel (but aluminum is fine.) I'm looking at getting a dozen or less so a good price, of course, is appreciable.

Thanks for any lead.

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Try Ravensbergen in Poco. I was there today so I know they have them, but did not look at the price as I was trying to practice self-restraint. Ravensbergen.com has a catalog and contact info.

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  • 4 weeks later...
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