Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Vancouver/Western Canada Ingredient Sources Topic


Recommended Posts

Where can I get freshly ground masa in Vancouver?

Thanks.

Zucchini Mama,

I saw Masa Harina (bulk in a bin/bucket) is available to purchase for $1.25/lb or $2.50 (IIRC)/kilo at La Salza Mexican Deli at 4140 East Hastings St. in Burnaby today. Their phone number is 604 299-6485. There was another item beside it in a matching bucket, but I can't remember what it was, I was concentrating on remembering the Masa. :laugh:

Thanks a bunch, cayenne. I actually found some at La Sureno on the Drive. They carry a treasure trove of Latin American ingredients. I made some champurrado with some masa harina, and am going to try tamales too.

Edited by Zucchini Mama (log)

"I used to be Snow White, but I drifted."

--Mae West

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey folks, I am having a lobster themed party and am desperately seeking a lobster-shaped mold (or two). Please let me know if you spy one in Vancouver at a thrift shop or bake store.

Zuke

I would try calling Scoop-N-Save. They rent out pans and have a lot to choose from. They are now in Langley.

Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Hi Choux

While I've obtained small quantities from butchers who make their own sausage, probably your best [and most economical] bet is to contact Stuffers Supply Company. They're out in Langley, and have pretty much everything you might want. I'm fairly sure that they do mail order within Canada.

I'm heading out there next week to buy a stuffing engine, having cursed the KA attachment pretty comprehensively while making our first batch of sausage from 'The Book' last weekend. Great sausage though....

In case you haven't found this out for yourself, it seems that "pink salt" is an American thing; here in Canada the same Nitrited curing salt is not dyed pink. I got some funny looks when asking for "pink salt". Of the various synonyms used, "Prague Powder #1" seems to be the most common.

cheers

Derek

Edited by DerekW (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I want to make hot-cross buns and muffins and would like to find some candied mixed peels. I see some in Safeway and IGA. However, they look unappetizing. I try to stay away from food coloring.

Is there some better quality candied peels out there that are not overly processed?

Thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also looking for cassava root.

Is this available in Vancouver?

Filipinos cook with cassava root all the time. It should be readily available at most Filipino or Asian greengrocers if not T&T.

What are you making with it?

Joie Alvaro Kent

"I like rice. Rice is great if you're hungry and want 2,000 of something." ~ Mitch Hedberg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is cassava root toxic if not cooked correctly? It's one of those ingredients that freak me out.

Yah, me too Lee.

I think I'd rather just use the cassava flour.

Moosh

I want to try making a Caribbean cassava pone.

It's a moist, very dense sweet cake with coconut and almond flavour.

We took the leftover pone and had it as French toast the next day with papaya and nutmeg jam.

Did I mention that we soaked the pone in rum overnight? :smile:

So is it sometimes sold with a waxy coating on the outside?

If so maybe I have seen it out there.

How is it used in recipes in the Philippines?

Edited by Chef Metcalf (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Moosh

I want to try making a Caribbean cassava pone.

It's a moist, very dense sweet cake with coconut and almond flavour.

We took the leftover pone and had it as French toast the next day with papaya and nutmeg jam.

Did  I mention that we soaked the pone in rum overnight?  :smile:

So is it sometimes sold with a waxy coating on the outside?

If so maybe I have seen it out there.

How is it used in recipes in the Philippines?

The cassava pone sounds heavenly! Yes to your question about the waxy coating.

Here are two ridiculously easy recipes for cassava-based desserts: bibingka cassava and cassava cake. Both insanely good.

Joie Alvaro Kent

"I like rice. Rice is great if you're hungry and want 2,000 of something." ~ Mitch Hedberg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I want to make hot-cross buns and muffins and would like to find some candied mixed peels.  I see some in Safeway and IGA.  However, they look unappetizing.  I try to stay away from food coloring. 

Is there some better quality candied peels out there that are not overly processed?

Thanks.

you're a pastry chef, no? why don't you just make it?

pre-made is gonna have preservatives or nastiness (this is my experience).

Drew Johnson

bread & coffee

i didn't write that book, but i did pass 8th grade without stress. and i'm a FCAT for sure.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is cassava root toxic if not cooked correctly? It's one of those ingredients that freak me out.

Yes, it's very toxic. In Bohol last year, 27+ children died from improperly prepared cassava. The woman who sold the sweets is still under house arrest (more as a protection than as a punishment, so our driver told us).

One can sometimes find frozen cassava in Chinese or Filipino grocery stores. I think it has already been cooked/treated to remove the toxins.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Moosh

I want to try making a Caribbean cassava pone.

It's a moist, very dense sweet cake with coconut and almond flavour.

We took the leftover pone and had it as French toast the next day with papaya and nutmeg jam.

Did  I mention that we soaked the pone in rum overnight?  :smile:

So is it sometimes sold with a waxy coating on the outside?

If so maybe I have seen it out there.

How is it used in recipes in the Philippines?

The cassava pone sounds heavenly! Yes to your question about the waxy coating.

Here are two ridiculously easy recipes for cassava-based desserts: bibingka cassava and cassava cake. Both insanely good.

The bibingka is really very similar to the Caribbean version of pone, until you get to the part about the cheese on top.

What kind of cheese do they use?

Do you ever buy raw cassava and bake with it?

I think I'd be scared to have the cute munchkin around that.

Both recipes sound good. What's the texture like in the finished product?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[host]

I'm going to have to ask that continued discussion of how to cook with cassava take place over in the Cooking forum.

While a quick search was unable to unearth any threads on cassava, HERE are some posts that discuss the product. If they don't help, I'm sure a new thread in Cooking on how to cook with cassava would be most welcome.

Thanks!

A.

[/host]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I want to make hot-cross buns and muffins and would like to find some candied mixed peels.  I see some in Safeway and IGA.  However, they look unappetizing.  I try to stay away from food coloring. 

Is there some better quality candied peels out there that are not overly processed?

Thanks.

you're a pastry chef, no? why don't you just make it?

pre-made is gonna have preservatives or nastiness (this is my experience).

No longer in the baking career. I just wanted to save time and find some good quality candied peels. Guess I'll search around google for a fast recipe.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nothing good to be found in Vancouver (storeboughtwise) as 3WC stated. Definitely better making it yourself. There's lots of good Citrus to be found around town.

Just juice, scoop the membrane out and blanch 3 - 4 times in water to cover, cold to boiling (changing each time until just tender). Then poach the peel (cut in quarters) in a simple syrup for 10 - 15 minutes.

Best of all you have all that great juice to drink while you make your Hot Cross Buns!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No longer in the baking career.  I just wanted to save time and find some good quality candied peels.  Guess I'll search around google for a fast recipe.

There's a microwave recipe by Andiesenji in RecipeGullet that produces excellent results. Make more than you need and just freeze the rest.

Baker of "impaired" cakes...
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for all your suggestions.  Will check out Granville Island and I will attempt to make them myself during the holiday.

Did you try Dan-D=Pak at the south end of Oak? - around 69th, on the corner opposite the Chevron. Their dried fruits are good quality, and they list mixed peel http://64.85.45.85/ddp/product/product.php?product_id=29 in their online catalogue.

John

"Venite omnes qui stomacho laboratis et ego restaurabo vos"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for all your suggestions.  Will check out Granville Island and I will attempt to make them myself during the holiday.

Did you try Dan-D=Pak at the south end of Oak? - around 69th, on the corner opposite the Chevron. Their dried fruits are good quality, and they list mixed peel http://64.85.45.85/ddp/product/product.php?product_id=29 in their online catalogue.

John

I think Dan-D-Pak also has a store on Broadway toward Macdonald if that is closer to your neigborhood.

The sea was angry that day my friends... like an old man trying to send back soup in a deli.

George Costanza

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hope this hasn't been asked already upthread, but where in Vancouver (or surrounding area) can I find the biggest, most exotic selection of hot sauces? Stuff like "Ass Kickin", "Fear Itself", "Denzel's", etc. It's going to be a gift (although I'll probably scoop up a few bottles for myself).

There was this great hot sauce specialty store in Toronto, which also carried various infused olive oils. I got some ultra-spicy peanuts there for my brother-in-law, and he loved them! The nuts were called "Acid Rain". Anybody know of a hot sauce specialty store around here?

album of the moment: Kelley Polar - I Need You To Hold On While The Sky Is Falling - 2008
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hope this hasn't been asked already upthread, but where in Vancouver (or surrounding area) can I find the biggest, most exotic selection of hot sauces? Stuff like "Ass Kickin", "Fear Itself", "Denzel's", etc. It's going to be a gift (although I'll probably scoop up a few bottles for myself).

There was this great hot sauce specialty store in Toronto, which also carried various infused olive oils. I got some ultra-spicy peanuts there for my brother-in-law, and he loved them! The nuts were called "Acid Rain". Anybody know of a hot sauce specialty store around here?

Oddly enough, they have quite the selection at Save-on Foods. Also, I think a variety of sauces may be available for purchase at Sammy J Peppers? It's been a heck of a long time since I've been there, and by no means do I recommend it beyond a place to get together to watch a game and quaff some beers, anyhow, a few years ago, they had quite the selection available. Maybe give them a call if you can't find your choices elsewhere, but I'm pretty sure the ones you mentioned are at Save-on.

"If cookin' with tabasco makes me white trash, I don't wanna be recycled."

courtesy of jsolomon

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...