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Vancouver/Western Canada Ingredient Sources Topic


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Make sure your Scottish style Black Pudding is my made directly by the butcher you purchased it from (if it's truly authentic the recipe will be someone's grandmother's that's been in the family for a few hundred years). Most of them are buying it from Freybe's now, which means it's a German style and not very good. As for Boudin Noir, have you tried the french deli on Granville Island. I can't remember their name at the moment. (Any help guys)

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  As for Boudin Noir, have you tried the french deli on Granville Island.  I can't remember their name at the moment.  (Any help guys)

I think the one your talking of is called Oyama Sausage Co. There products are great. I love the toulouse. There terrines and pates also rock. Haven't tried there black pudd yet.

http://www.oyamasausage.com/index.htm

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  • 3 weeks later...

someone told me that her favourite fruit was this thing that looked like a large grape (pinkish white or orange) covered in leaves.

from her description, i've narrowed it down to the Physalis. Specifically the Cape Gooseberry or the Ground Cherry.

Now, where in the GVRD would I be able to find that for her? I'm thinking of giving her a large basket of it for Christmas. She says that she loves that fruit very much but has only eaten it once and wishes she knew what it was and could have more of it.

Do not expect INTJs to actually care about how you view them. They already know that they are arrogant bastards with a morbid sense of humor. Telling them the obvious accomplishes nothing.

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Many thanks! i shall head down to Urban Fare and take a look. I live in Abbotsford, we have lots of cattle. hahah.

Now my only decision is whether to give it to her for Christmas, a great big basket of her favourite fruit, or give it to her early cuz I just couldn't bear to wait that long to give it to her.

Do not expect INTJs to actually care about how you view them. They already know that they are arrogant bastards with a morbid sense of humor. Telling them the obvious accomplishes nothing.

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Google.ca is a good thing!

Found you these links for South Alder Farms in Aldergrove and Driediger Farms in Langley. Both are fairly close to Abbotsford and will hopefully have what you're looking for. I also tracked down a couple of farms on Vancouver Island, but why make the trek over if you can find gooseberries close to home.

:smile:

Edited by Mooshmouse (log)

Joie Alvaro Kent

"I like rice. Rice is great if you're hungry and want 2,000 of something." ~ Mitch Hedberg

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someone told me that her favourite fruit was this thing that looked like a large grape (pinkish white or orange) covered in leaves.

I gotta think you're looking for Ground Cherries. I grew some (okay, J grew them!) last summer on the patio, so saddly I don't have any for your gift.

Anything you're going to find now will be from warmer climates, so I'd go with Urba Fare (sorry Moosh).

A.

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It's truffle season all over the world and yet all that I can find are those awfull sweaty, spungy looking ones in jars (no doubt this is where the 'spungeform' part of BSD comes from). Is there any place in Vancouver that sells fresh truffles?

Seattle is a possibility but just try and explain what a truffle is to the border guard.

Any ideas?

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Urban Fare has decent if a bit dry black truffles. They need to be cooked. Don't expect much information on thier provenence, the counter people don't really know (care). BTW they are at the cheese counter. I made a rissotto with mine, peel them and infuse the boiling stock with the peels. I jullienned the rest and folded it in with about 5 minutes left in the cooking. Truth is you need some good truffle oil to boost the flavour just before serving. Get the oil at the Gourmet Warehouse, not at the fancy Save On (Urban Fare).

David Cooper

"I'm no friggin genius". Rob Dibble

http://www.starlinebyirion.com/

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  • 3 weeks later...

A friend is visiting from Sacramento and wants to make his "famous" Meyer lemon granita for us - anyone know where we can find them ?

''Wine is a beverage to enjoy with your meal, with good conversation, if it's too expensive all you talk about is the wine.'' Bill Bowers - The Captain's Tavern, Miami

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A friend is visiting from Sacramento and wants to make his "famous" Meyer lemon granita for us - anyone know where we can find them ?

Whole foods at Park Royal carries them on a regular basis.

A little pricier than the regular but not as acidic.

Chef M

Edited by Chef Metcalf (log)
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This may be too late for you 2roost but I did see Myer lemons available at Choices Market on 16th Avenue the other day.

sarah

Always take a good look at what you're about to eat. It's not so important to know what it is, but it's critical to know what it was. --Unknown

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi everyone,

This is my first post here. Actually, I've been following this forum since I moved here last year. I have opened up a small business here, called cafelucia, which was written up by the Georgia Strait newspaper a while ago.

So, anyway, as the title implies, where can I find a commercial source for these Spanish White Anchovies? I've tried several specialty vendors in the area such as Tosi's, but they just look at me funny. For those people who don't know what these anchovies are: They're pretty big, with filets the size of your middle finger. They're usually packed in white wine vinegar (or plain vinegar), herbs, and sometimes with a little olive oil. They're not very salty, nor briney. I am having a very hard time finding them. Coincidentally, several of my vendors have mentioned that there is an anchovy "shortage", globally.

Any help would be appreciated! Thank you!

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Just for the record, the white anchovies are called in Spain boquerones en vinagre, literally anchovies in vinegar. The white color is the effect of marinating them in vinegar. The origin of this preparation probably has arabic roots, being a variation over the escabeche (pickling) techniques introduced by the moors to Spain centuries ago.

It's a dish that's not hard to cook and is done at home a fair number of times.

Boquerones is the name of anchovies in Southern Spain, commonly used to refer to the fresh fish, that is, when it's not preserved in oil and salt like the other anchovies. In the latter case, we use the name anchoas, which is the Northern Spain term for the fish.

PedroEspinosa (aka pedro)

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