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how do you measure honey


cognitivefun
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I LIGHT spritz of cooking spray helps it to not stick. But, if I don't want to drag out the spray for a tablespoon or two, I scrape it all out with my finger.... Plus, I have a liquid measure that is 4T, marked into 1/2T increments (made by OXO). Use it for just these things that stick, so I only have to scrape it all out once. Like to get every last drop......

ETA: If I'm measuring oil in a tablespoon also, I do that first and can avoid the spritz of cooking spray.

Edited by SweetSide (log)
Cheryl, The Sweet Side
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For baking, I just set the whole bowl of batter on the kitchen scale, set the tare to zero, then add however many ounces/grams of honey the recipe requires. Unless you know the conversions by heart, you'll need to check the label on the honey to see what the weight of a tablespoon is, then add accordingly :smile: .

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For baking, I just set the whole bowl of batter on the kitchen scale, set the tare to zero, then add however many ounces/grams of honey the recipe requires.  Unless you know the conversions by heart, you'll need to check the label on the honey to see what the weight of a tablespoon is, then add accordingly  :smile: .

If I'm doing a larger amount, I do that too. Just be sure to watch out for an inadvertant "glug" at the end... :rolleyes:

Cheryl, The Sweet Side
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I can't believe noone has mentioned the Wondercup. This is what is was made for. As well as peanut butter, corn syrup, etc. It works great. It measures teaspoons, tablespoons, and cup sizes.

I agree, I have both the 1-cup and 2-cup and they work nicely for measuring sticky stuff and they are accurate!

I also have a set of the non-stick measuring spoons that I think are Calphalon - made of nylon. I also have the Danesco silicone measuring spoons and cups but I haven't found them to be particularly non-stick.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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IMHO, nothing beats the scale when it comes to measuring things like honey, corn syrup, and molasses. Even with the Wondercup, which is an awesome invention and probably the best way if you don't have a scale, you have the extra steps of measuring into a measuring cup before adding the ingredient to the rest of the recipe, and cleaning the measuring cup itself.

"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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I agree with you Patrick, however a lot of people find it difficult to convert recipes to weight from volume.

Having been a commercial baker, I have converted many of my favorite bread, cake and etc., recipes to weight, but if I am trying a new recipe with volume measures, I prepare it as written and if I find it works for me, then I convert it.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I scrape the residue out of the spoon with my (clean!) index finger--hands are useful tools.

This method has the particularly attractive result of a finger to lick honey off of. Makes it a winner in my book! :laugh:

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