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Dailey

Rosie's Buttercream...

62 posts in this topic

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cheryl, i just mixed all the ingredients in my KA with the whisk attachment for about 10 minutes, it looked terribly curdled.  then i switched to the paddle and let it go on high for about 15 min. and it became perfectly light and fluffy.  here is what rosie says about the buttercream

"a fluffy white frosting not overly sugary.  this recipe is one you'll use often.  it last several days out of the refriderator, but will require rewhipping after it sits out for a while to restore its fluffy texture."

1. place all ingredients in food processor and process until light and fluffy, about 5 min.  stop machine several times to scrape down the sides of the bowl with rubber spatula.

2. transfer the buttercream to a med-size bowl and using paddle attachment of electric mixer, continue to beat on med-high until buttercream is white and fluffy (it really does turn white!) 15-20 min.  stop the mixer to scrape the bowl several times with rubber spatula.  if you don't have paddle attachment, used the whisk.  use frosting within an hour or it will need rewhipping.  makes 2-2 1/4 cups, enought to fill and frost 2 or 4 layer cake.

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Hmmm, I'm wondering if the food processor part is because there is so much cream being added that it needs to have those blades to help emulsify the cream into the butter and sugar. Then the mixer gets it fluffy.

I'm wondering, too, that if you beat the butter and sugar in the mixer and add the cream slowly if it will prevent the mixture from going through the curdled stage and maybe cut down on the length of time to get it to come together?

Any expert care to weigh in on those thoughts of mine? Just tell me if I'm out in left field....

Just a thought, the food processor then mixer, beating for 15 minutes -- it's enough to basically make the whipping cream turn to butter, so that it makes the icing stiff and emulsifies the water into the sugar. Since there is no extra water, what you saw as "weeping" was the cream separating into butter and whey. Just like extra beating incorporates air and emulsifies meringue buttercream, so with this.

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I see this version listed online, using a mocha mixture, yum, but same recipe.  My question is why start the whipping process in a food processor and and then transfer to a mixer to finish?  Interesting.

rodney,

can you share where you found the mocha version of this recipe? i'm wanting to play around with different flavors added to the original, chocolate in particular, thanks. :smile:

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any ideas on how I could do a chocolate version of this recipe?

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any ideas on how I could do a chocolate version of this recipe?

i'm thinking maybe add some melted bittersweet chocolate? not sure on what it would do to the texture though as this buttercream seems delicate.

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any ideas on how I could do a chocolate version of this recipe?

You can probably add anywhere from 4 to 6oz of bittersweet, semisweet or milk chocolate (not unsweetened) melted and cooled to room temp. Add at the end with some vanilla, and or espresso (cooled), and re-whip. If it breaks, then just add more powdered sugar; say a 1/2 to 1 cup until it comes back together. I don't think you will have a problem though.

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Thanks Rodney & Dailey.

Rodney, this may be a very dumb question, but thus far, buttercreams have not been kind to me... they do have a tendency to break up on me :hmmm:

Do you think it would work if I made a very liquid ganache with your suggested 4-6 oz choc and the cream in the recipe... and just put it through the whole process with the rest of the ingredients i.e. food processor then the mixer? Would it break up on me even more?

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Thanks Rodney & Dailey.

Rodney, this may be a very dumb question, but thus far, buttercreams have not been kind to me... they do have a tendency to break up on me  :hmmm:

Do you think it would work if I made a very liquid ganache with your suggested 4-6 oz choc and the cream in the recipe... and just put it through the whole process with the rest of the ingredients i.e. food processor then the mixer? Would it break up on me even more?

Firstly, there are no dumb questions, especially in baking. :biggrin:

Here are my thoughts, and let me say that this is a new frosting for me as well. I have not had time to perfect and fiddle with it properly as I am working on several cake recipes at the moment. What I would do is not mix the ganache in the food processor. I think that function is to emulsify the butter and cream together in this particular recipe, and the ganache might prevent this. There are versions of making ganache using a food processor, but for this recipe, I think it wise not to try it.

I would instead make the ganache, then make this frosting, and then add the ganache in 1 cup at a time; beating with each addition. It should be a lovely alternative, plus you may be able to elevate the chocolate amount this way, and that is a good thing in my book, lol

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Thanks Rodney. I guess now it's just for me to get off my toosh and go experiment with this a little.

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Obviously, I'm VERY late to this party. :huh:

But does anyone know if Rosie's Buttercream can take color well? Does it cope well at room temperature for a few hours? And finally, does it pipe well (not flowers or anything fancy, just borders)?

I'm also wondering, since the coversation earlier was of the safety of IMBC, is it considered safe or not to serve it to children? I've read that it is and it isn't safe. What's the deal? I'm making a cake for a kid's birthday party and don't want to get anyone sick.

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I am excited to try this recipe too.... but i do not have a food processor. Do you think the texture will be grainy if i just use my KA with the paddle attachment?

Thanks.

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