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If it's not Kraft it's not Parmesan


CtznCane
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Comfort food and childhood favorites have no logic. They just are.

Its possible to know something is "bad" food and still enjoy eating it.

I think it's pretty hard to argue against this. Lots of people become attached to foods in childhood that they wouldn't touch if introduced to them as adults. Maybe some people are completely free of such attachments, but I've never met one.

When I go back to childhood foods, I often find myself disappointed, though.

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When I go back to childhood foods, I often find myself disappointed, though.

Me too. :sad:

And also :happy: because that means I've changed, and that can be good.

I remember progressing from the green can to the grated stuff in the fridge at Trader Joes, to buying actual blocks of cheese at a high quality shop (suitable for eating alone or grating on plain pasta), to buying larger blocks at Price Club, grating and freezing it for future speed.

Im working toward that 30 min meal prep time that allows a few of those 2 min and 30 second steps... by the time I get there, it'll probably be tolerable to have the grater at table without the munchkin wanting to test the gratability of little fingers.

But godforbid a child try less than perfect italian food until its old enough to appreciate every nuance. :laugh: Even if cooked by the italian neighbors. And godknows there are no bad cooks in italy... :wacko:

"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

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To dislike Kraft "Parmesan" is one thing, that's fine.

But to tell others what they should use in cooking and how they should determine what to make? Just seems sanctimonious to me.

I thought this place was about sharing different interests, not inflicting methods and interests on others.

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To dislike Kraft "Parmesan" is one thing, that's fine.

But to tell others what they should use in cooking and how they should determine what to make? Just seems sanctimonious to me.

I thought this place was about sharing different interests, not inflicting methods and interests on others.

You and everyone else is welcome to use Kraft or whatever they want, that is personal choice and not the issue here. It is not an "interest" to note that Kraft Parmesan is an inferior product that makes your food taste worse than it would without it. The debate here is supposed to be between people that want to make their cooking better, not settle for the Better Homes and Gardens cookbook and canned green beans with canned mushroom soup with canned fried onions. It's fine to like that dish, bit it's not fine to argue that it's good cooking.

Would you argue it's fine for me to put a bunch of syrah in my pinot noir and call it pinot noir? It would not taste like pinot noir although you may like it.

To be against a product like Kraft Parmesan is not sanctimonious, it's just caring about food.

Edited by Craig Camp (log)
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To dislike Kraft "Parmesan" is one thing, that's fine.

But to tell others what they should use in cooking and how they should determine what to make? Just seems sanctimonious to me.

I thought this place was about sharing different interests, not inflicting methods and interests on others.

You and everyone else is welcome to use Kraft or whatever they want, that is personal choice and not the issue here. It is not an "interest" to note that Kraft Parmesan is an inferior product that makes your food taste worse than it would without it. The debate here is supposed to be between people that want to make their cooking better, not settle for the Better Homes and Gardens cookbook and canned green beans with canned mushroom soup with canned fried onions. It's fine to like that dish, bit it's not fine to argue that it's good cooking.

Would you argue it's fine for me to put a bunch of syrah in my pinot noir and call it pinot noir? It would not taste like pinot noir although you may like it.

To be against a product like Kraft Parmesan is not sanctimonious, it's just caring about food.

I may have misinterpreted the topic of this post but I didn't think the point was a debate about making anyone's cooking better, just an appreciation for an admittedly inferior product.

To compare putting Syrah into a Pinot Noir and calling it Pinot and Kraft's product and Parmesan is hardly equal. The topic of this post suggests that Kraft is not "Parmesan", which is a given. This type of debate irkes me, because it infers that cheap products are somehow "unworthy". They are out there because they are sold, and used by many, despite differing tastes. A steak is still a steak, whether it's ordered at Sizzler or Peter Luger.

I thought the point of the post was admitting a taste for an some what gauche product, and letting it be at that. No one suggested it was "good cooking".

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To dislike Kraft "Parmesan" is one thing, that's fine.

But to tell others what they should use in cooking and how they should determine what to make? Just seems sanctimonious to me.

I thought this place was about sharing different interests, not inflicting methods and interests on others.

You and everyone else is welcome to use Kraft or whatever they want, that is personal choice and not the issue here. It is not an "interest" to note that Kraft Parmesan is an inferior product that makes your food taste worse than it would without it. The debate here is supposed to be between people that want to make their cooking better, not settle for the Better Homes and Gardens cookbook and canned green beans with canned mushroom soup with canned fried onions. It's fine to like that dish, bit it's not fine to argue that it's good cooking.

Would you argue it's fine for me to put a bunch of syrah in my pinot noir and call it pinot noir? It would not taste like pinot noir although you may like it.

To be against a product like Kraft Parmesan is not sanctimonious, it's just caring about food.

I may have misinterpreted the topic of this post but I didn't think the point was a debate about making anyone's cooking better, just an appreciation for an admittedly inferior product.

To compare putting Syrah into a Pinot Noir and calling it Pinot and Kraft's product and Parmesan is hardly equal. The topic of this post suggests that Kraft is not "Parmesan", which is a given. This type of debate irkes me, because it infers that cheap products are somehow "unworthy". They are out there because they are sold, and used by many, despite differing tastes. A steak is still a steak, whether it's ordered at Sizzler or Peter Luger.

I thought the point of the post was admitting a taste for an some what gauche product, and letting it be at that. No one suggested it was "good cooking".

You're probably right and I apologise to all for my intensity. It is brought on by a life committed to making a product that matters and also by my time living in Italy. It Italy I learned that the name Parmigiano meant something that should be respected and I am probably overreacting here where that is not the fact.

However, I firmly believe that simplicity as a goal applies both in making wine and in cooking. To cook well and to make good wine means only seeking out the best raw materials and then not screwing them up. I also believe sometimes the name of something should mean something and if a product does not live up to that name you should avoid it.

For me to try to make cabernet sauvignon here in the northern Willamette Valley would not do justice to that vine. There may be many consumers that love it, but it would not be an honest thing to do. That's how I feel about Kraft Parmesan, it's just not an honest product so it should not be used as it only degrades a dish.

As this is my life, it is also my obsession, so perhaps I was carried away and I apologise.

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This type of debate irkes me, because it infers that cheap products are somehow "unworthy".

As indeed they often are. However, not because they are cheap, but because they are made by companies like Kraft. Kraft might be cheaper, I wouldn't know, but a little real Parmesan goes a very long way. It's not beyond the reach of the average consumer. Actual money saved with the processed product is probably as minimal as actual labour saved. The main saving with Kraft is flavour.

Edited by Ohba (log)
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As indeed they often are. However, not because they are cheap, but because they are made by companies like Kraft. Kraft might be cheaper, I wouldn't know, but a little real Parmesan goes a very long way. It's not beyond the reach of the average consumer. Actual money saved with the processed product is probably as minimal as actual labour saved. The main saving with Kraft is flavour.

Given that my plate of spaghetti resembles the Sierra Nevada no matter whether I use genuine Parmesan or an inferior product, I suspect that the savings might actually be more real than you might imagine given similar behavior. After all, a liberal application of $8.99/lb Parmigiano-Reggiano will cost about twice as much as an equally liberal application of $5.99/lb American industrial grade Parmesan-style cheese.

For those watching their pennies, the savings may be large enough to trump the flavor considerations.

BTW, as for Kraft Macaroni and Cheese, let me state that I didn't grow up eating the stuff and do not buy it now. (Edited to add: Pardon me for tossing the race card onto the table, but if I could do it with Green Bean Casserole, why not here? I can't think of a self-respecting African-American cook who would do anything other than make their own mac 'n' cheese from scratch, though use of Velveeta is OK.) But if a houseguest brings five boxes in with him as a contribution to the pantry, I would consider it an insult to the guest not to make use of his offer.

Edited by MarketStEl (log)

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

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To dislike Kraft "Parmesan" is one thing, that's fine.

But to tell others what they should use in cooking and how they should determine what to make? Just seems sanctimonious to me.

I thought this place was about sharing different interests, not inflicting methods and interests on others.

You and everyone else is welcome to use Kraft or whatever they want, that is personal choice and not the issue here. It is not an "interest" to note that Kraft Parmesan is an inferior product that makes your food taste worse than it would without it. The debate here is supposed to be between people that want to make their cooking better, not settle for the Better Homes and Gardens cookbook and canned green beans with canned mushroom soup with canned fried onions. It's fine to like that dish, bit it's not fine to argue that it's good cooking.

Would you argue it's fine for me to put a bunch of syrah in my pinot noir and call it pinot noir? It would not taste like pinot noir although you may like it.

To be against a product like Kraft Parmesan is not sanctimonious, it's just caring about food.

I may have misinterpreted the topic of this post but I didn't think the point was a debate about making anyone's cooking better, just an appreciation for an admittedly inferior product.

To compare putting Syrah into a Pinot Noir and calling it Pinot and Kraft's product and Parmesan is hardly equal. The topic of this post suggests that Kraft is not "Parmesan", which is a given. This type of debate irkes me, because it infers that cheap products are somehow "unworthy". They are out there because they are sold, and used by many, despite differing tastes. A steak is still a steak, whether it's ordered at Sizzler or Peter Luger.

I thought the point of the post was admitting a taste for an some what gauche product, and letting it be at that. No one suggested it was "good cooking".

You're probably right and I apologise to all for my intensity. It is brought on by a life committed to making a product that matters and also by my time living in Italy. It Italy I learned that the name Parmigiano meant something that should be respected and I am probably overreacting here where that is not the fact.

However, I firmly believe that simplicity as a goal applies both in making wine and in cooking. To cook well and to make good wine means only seeking out the best raw materials and then not screwing them up. I also believe sometimes the name of something should mean something and if a product does not live up to that name you should avoid it.

For me to try to make cabernet sauvignon here in the northern Willamette Valley would not do justice to that vine. There may be many consumers that love it, but it would not be an honest thing to do. That's how I feel about Kraft Parmesan, it's just not an honest product so it should not be used as it only degrades a dish.

As this is my life, it is also my obsession, so perhaps I was carried away and I apologise.

Don't apologize, I also took it a little too personally-- and without real merit as I completely agree with your attitude towards fresh and basic foods. I must admit I haven't even had Kraft "Parmesan" in at least 6 years (and I'm 26). I'm reminded of how the other day in my Food and Beverage Management class when asked what the Olive Garden was, I immediately responded "it's disgusting" and felt I spoke out when younger classmates said they loved it. But I stand by it being revolting.

As someone who is just venturing into appreciating wine, I appreciate where you're coming from. And I can see how Kraft is not an "honest" approach to cheese, btu sometimes their little blue box of garbage Mac n Cheese is somehow appropriate at 3am!

Edited by Meredith380 (log)
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To dislike Kraft "Parmesan" is one thing, that's fine.

But to tell others what they should use in cooking and how they should determine what to make? Just seems sanctimonious to me.

I thought this place was about sharing different interests, not inflicting methods and interests on others.

You and everyone else is welcome to use Kraft or whatever they want, that is personal choice and not the issue here. It is not an "interest" to note that Kraft Parmesan is an inferior product that makes your food taste worse than it would without it. The debate here is supposed to be between people that want to make their cooking better, not settle for the Better Homes and Gardens cookbook and canned green beans with canned mushroom soup with canned fried onions. It's fine to like that dish, bit it's not fine to argue that it's good cooking.

Would you argue it's fine for me to put a bunch of syrah in my pinot noir and call it pinot noir? It would not taste like pinot noir although you may like it.

To be against a product like Kraft Parmesan is not sanctimonious, it's just caring about food.

I may have misinterpreted the topic of this post but I didn't think the point was a debate about making anyone's cooking better, just an appreciation for an admittedly inferior product.

To compare putting Syrah into a Pinot Noir and calling it Pinot and Kraft's product and Parmesan is hardly equal. The topic of this post suggests that Kraft is not "Parmesan", which is a given. This type of debate irkes me, because it infers that cheap products are somehow "unworthy". They are out there because they are sold, and used by many, despite differing tastes. A steak is still a steak, whether it's ordered at Sizzler or Peter Luger.

I thought the point of the post was admitting a taste for an some what gauche product, and letting it be at that. No one suggested it was "good cooking".

You're probably right and I apologise to all for my intensity. It is brought on by a life committed to making a product that matters and also by my time living in Italy. It Italy I learned that the name Parmigiano meant something that should be respected and I am probably overreacting here where that is not the fact.

However, I firmly believe that simplicity as a goal applies both in making wine and in cooking. To cook well and to make good wine means only seeking out the best raw materials and then not screwing them up. I also believe sometimes the name of something should mean something and if a product does not live up to that name you should avoid it.

For me to try to make cabernet sauvignon here in the northern Willamette Valley would not do justice to that vine. There may be many consumers that love it, but it would not be an honest thing to do. That's how I feel about Kraft Parmesan, it's just not an honest product so it should not be used as it only degrades a dish.

As this is my life, it is also my obsession, so perhaps I was carried away and I apologise.

Don't apologize, I also took it a little too personally-- and without real merit as I completely agree with your attitude towards fresh and basic foods. I must admit I haven't even had Kraft "Parmesan" in at least 6 years (and I'm 26). I'm reminded of how the other day in my Food and Beverage Management class when asked what the Olive Garden was, I immediately responded "it's disgusting" and felt I spoke out when younger classmates said they loved it. But I stand by it being revolting.

As someone who is just venturing into appreciating wine, I appreciate where you're coming from. And I can see how Kraft is not an "honest" approach to cheese, btu sometimes their little blue box of garbage Mac n Cheese is somehow appropriate at 3am!

Thanks for understanding. To explain, at 3 a.m. (not that I am up anymore at that time :hmmm: ) I would go for some pasta with hot pepper flakes and garlic. It takes the same amount of time as the Kraft Mac n Cheese but tastes a lot better. The point is its very EASY to cook well if you cook good stuff.

Edited by Craig Camp (log)
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I love it! :biggrin: I haven't had the green kraft for over 20 years and I'll admit I couldn't get enough growing up. I'll also admit to looking with longing at some strange "eazy cheeze" at the store but don't have the courage to buy it anymore. This thread is putting a smile on my face - but only for the memories. I remember my best friend LMF said to me about 10 years ago when she got some REAL parm in her hands...........she would NEVER be without it and I guess the same goes for me. It is worth it at this point in my life.

I agree with Craig (posted upthread) I would rather have pasta with garlic and chili flakes than have the Kraft green - but seeing as this thread is about what we loved as kids........Can I just say that I find it sad that what I loved was Kraft Mac and Cheese with extra slices of Kraft American Cheese "food" melted in and now it would probably make me ill?

Long live Patte Labelle and Martha!!!! (mac and cheese tribute here)..........I think I digress but I am thinking cheese so I am guessing it is ok......Della

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Out of curiosity, I went to the Kraft website to see if I could find out how long this product has been on the market:

http://164.109.46.215/profile/spot_milestones.html

60 years! For sixty years, well before real parm became widely commercially available, this was the ONLY alternative for many years for the vast majority of the population of the United States. Technically, it is really cheese as well. Milk, salt, an enzyme and a culture. It's not a cheese food fabricated from vegetable oil, a stabilizer and food color.

It really is amazing how many Kraft brands are household staples and have been around for a hundred years or better, though quite a few came to Kraft through acquisition (Kraft is only 100 years old as a corporation, but the brand name has been around longer):

# Terry's chocolates, 1767, York, England

# Grey Poupon mustard, 1777, France

# Baker's chocolate, 1780, Dorchester, MA

# Altoids mints, early 1800s, England

# A.1. steak sauce, 1820s, England

# Suchard confections, 1825, Neuchâtel, Switzerland

# Bird's custard, 1837, England

# Christie crackers and bakery products, 1853, Toronto, ON

# Peek Freans cookies, 1857, Dockhead, England

# Claussen pickles, 1870, Chicago, IL

# Canale baked goods, 1875, Buenos Aires, Argentina

# Premium crackers, 1876, St. Joseph, MO

# Philadelphia cream cheese, 1880, New York, NY

# Breakstone's dairy products, 1882, New York, NY

# Côte d'Or chocolates, 1883, Belgium

# Oscar Mayer meats, 1883, Chicago, IL

# Calumet baking powder, 1889, Chicago, IL

# Newtons cookies, 1891, New York, NY

# Maxwell House coffee, 1892, Nashville, TN

# Shredded Wheat cereal, 1892, Watertown, NY

# Freia confections, 1892, Norway

# Cream of Wheat cereal, 1893, Grand Forks, ND

# Postum cereal beverage, 1895, Battle Creek, MI

# Minute tapioca, 1895, Orange, MA

# Jacobs coffee, 1895, Germany

# Grape-Nuts cereal, 1897, Battle Creek, MI

# Jell-O gelatin, 1897, LeRoy, NY

# Baker's coconut, 1897, Philadelphia, PA

# Uneeda biscuits, 1898, Chicago, IL

# Polly-O cheese, 1899, Brooklyn, NY

# Nabisco sugar wafers, 1901, Chicago, IL

# Milka chocolate, 1901, Germany

# Triscuit crackers, 1902, Watertown, NY

# Barnum's Animals crackers, 1902, Chicago, IL

# Kraft cheese, 1903, Chicago, IL

Barnum's Animal Crackers! I would get a box every Sunday morning after I ate my breakfast to snack on until a late Sunday Dinner came around about 3 PM. Loved them! I have quite a few of those other brands in my cabinet now.

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As a kid in the 1950s & 1960s, I enjoyed a lot of unusual food items that my peers just gawked at, but I never could abide the Kraft Parmesan, which, yes, was a staple in our house too. I always had my spaghetti cheese-free.

The pre-grated cheese at most Italian restaurants, which I tried a few times as I grew older, didn't seem much better.

This sad legacy kept me from trying the freshly grated stuff for a couple of decades. What a waste, and what a revelation when I finally did. I always grate my own now (though I've come to prefer romano on most things).

Thank God for tea! What would the world do without tea? How did it exist? I am glad I was not born before tea!

- Sydney Smith, English clergyman & essayist, 1771-1845

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After all, a liberal application of $8.99/lb Parmigiano-Reggiano will cost about twice as much as an equally liberal application of $5.99/lb American industrial grade Parmesan-style cheese.

For those watching their pennies, the savings may be large enough to trump the flavor considerations.

That was why I said "the average consumer". A $3 price difference per pound eked out over numerous plates of pasta adds up to cents per serving, not dollars. At the risk of sounding callous about the less well-off, most people can take that hit. This is before even factoring in the lower quantity required when using proper cheese instead of soapy ol' Kraft flakes. Gram for gram, a half decent parmesan will stretch much further.

Edited by Ohba (log)
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Comfort food and childhood favorites have no logic. They just are.

Its possible to know something is "bad" food and still enjoy eating it.

I also agree with this! I always had Green Can Cheese on many food growing up (I won't eat broccoli without it), and still tend to have a mini blizzard on my food with it.

I have tried various other hard cheeses, but find that the fresh Parmagiano I bought a chunck of has less flavor than the Green Can!!! Therefore, I can honestly say I do still prefer the Green Can at home. Partly due to the "childhood favorite", but something is probably amiss with my fresh grated cheese. I suspect I bought an inferior piece. I've also got some Romano on hand, which is more flavorful, and much better. Is fresh grated Parmagiano a realtively milder cheese? I also think my grating may have something to do with it - I use a wheel-crank style, which shaves very fine pieces of cheese off. Is this desired?

I have also sliced it, and then the taste is better, but the Parmagiano I bought has crystal chunks in it (I don't know how to describe it - crunchy crystalline bits embedded in the cheese.) Well, next time I should just find a better source.

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I have tried various other hard cheeses, but find that the fresh Parmagiano I bought a chunck of has less flavor than the Green Can!!!  Therefore, I can honestly say I do still prefer the Green Can at home.  Partly due to the "childhood favorite", but something is probably amiss with my fresh grated cheese.  I suspect I bought an inferior piece.  I've also got some Romano on hand, which is more flavorful, and much better.  Is fresh grated Parmagiano a realtively milder cheese?  I also think my grating may have something to do with it - I use a wheel-crank style, which shaves very fine pieces of cheese off.  Is this desired? 

I don't think the grating has much influence on flavor; I've used several methods, depending on what I'm using it for. If your cheese isn't flavorful, then it's a bad cheese. Try imported over domestic, and more aged over less aged. If you can get a 36- or 48-month aged Parmesan, it will knock your socks off, I promise. (Actually, a cheese like that is probably too good, and too expensive, to put on pasta.)

On a general note, it's funny that this topic has come up. I was recently reminiscing about the green can, and thinking that I hadn't had the Kraft cheese since I was a kid. Actually, my parents have moved on up past it as well; part of the gourmetizing of our culture, I guess.

One other anecdote: I was at the cheese shop a week or two ago, and there was a dad there with his young (probably 3 or 4 years old) son. I asked the kid what his favorite cheese was, and he replied with that little-kid lisp. "Pawmigiano-Weggiano." It was pretty adorable.

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Good quality Parmigiano Reggiano, for lack of a better term, is more "cheese-like" than the American/rest-of-the-world versions. It is not all hard and dried out, but moist and delicious to eat on its own. The darker, drier area near the rind should be very small with most of the cheese having a very light cream color.

It is worth noting that Italian's grate far less cheese on their pasta than Americans. It is not the goal to add so much cheese that it becomes "cheesy" and a dominate flavor, but to enhance the flavors of the dish just as you would with salt and pepper.

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After all, a liberal application of $8.99/lb Parmigiano-Reggiano will cost about twice as much as an equally liberal application of $5.99/lb American industrial grade Parmesan-style cheese.

I can't remember the last time I saw imported P-R for only $8.99 a pound. Is this really what you pay at DiBruno's or Reading? Here in D.C. $14 is a good price and it's recently climbed again.

Now that Grana Padano is more readily available, I do what Italians do and save a little money by using this as an ordinary grating cheese, reserving P-R for dishes where I think it would make a difference. It's also made from cow's milk. Whether Locatelli (not the brand of pre-grated cheese menton1 finds in the NE, but an Italian cheese) or a less costly Pecorino Romano, cheeses produced from sheep's milk are not less expensive substitutes for P-R since the taste is different.

* * *

This thread reminds me of one I started on nutrition. It's insulting to tell someone that the thing she eats might be replaced by something superior. It's a personal slight. It can also be interpreted as a class thing.

I find the comment made about comfort food the most salient. If you were raised on Kraft grated cheese and you look back to those meals with longing and affection, then you may very well like the stuff as a grown-up even though you like P-R (too many different associations for Rachael Ray to adopt?) too. This I can understand. You might even find Kraft more flavorful because it's sharper, saltier or stronger in taste--and what you are more accustomed to sprinkling on Italian-American food.

What I find more puzzling are the people who buy Parmigiano-Reggiano grated just because they grew up with Kraft and don't think about grating their own cheese. Then again, I ground coffee beans in the store for years before I bought my own grinder and I can't remember the last time I baked bread even though it's perfectly easy to do.

I also wonder about Stella or other domestic US brands from Wisconsin that were developed back when Parmigiano-Reggiano was not widely available in the United States. I suspect the brands survive because people grew up with them and don't know any better. :wink: Cost may be another factor, but it still amazes me that the "gourmet cheese" bin at my local Safeway supermarkets just has the domestic wedges, sold as a classier product than the bars of storebrand Cheddar over in a different section of the store. Another big-chain supermarket in this area, Giant sells real P-R in addition to the stuff from Wisconsin, but at a price much higher than Whole Foods.

"Viciousness in the kitchen.

The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

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have tried various other hard cheeses, but find that the fresh Parmagiano I bought a chunck of has less flavor than the Green Can!!! Therefore, I can honestly say I do still prefer the Green Can at home. Partly due to the "childhood favorite", but something is probably amiss with my fresh grated cheese. I suspect I bought an inferior piece. I've also got some Romano on hand, which is more flavorful, and much better. Is fresh grated Parmagiano a realtively milder cheese? I also think my grating may have something to do with it - I use a wheel-crank style, which shaves very fine pieces of cheese off. Is this desired?

I think the parmagiano is milder than the pecorino romano because the romano is a sheep's milk cheese. The romano has more of a "bite" to it.

Edited by SheenaGreena (log)
BEARS, BEETS, BATTLESTAR GALACTICA
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I find the comment made about comfort food the most salient.  If you were raised on Kraft grated cheese and you look back to those meals with longing and affection, then you may very well like the stuff as a grown-up even though you like P-R (too many different associations for Rachael Ray to adopt?) too.  This I can understand.  You might even find Kraft more flavorful because it's sharper, saltier or stronger in taste--and what you are more accustomed to sprinkling on Italian-American food. 

I find the canned cheese has a sour-milk taste to it. Strangely, I've also heard the childhood factor used to explain why some people prefer Hershey's milk chocolate, which has a sour milk taste as well. :hmmm:

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All i know is I had to put my computer down in the midst of reading this post and put a pot of boiling water on the stove...walk to the corner market (in my pajama pants and all), which is literally on the corner about 20 steps from my porch (love it) and purchase a BLOCK (to grate myself) of parmagiano ramano cheese. Ventured the 20 steps home, placed spagetti in water...cooked al-dente... drain, butter, season, and finally -------grate generous protions of cheese over pasta (yes yes I know true italians use a sparing amount...but guess what - I am not a true italian - not an italian at all...and even if I was, I would still load on cheese as my moto with cheese "the more the merrier"). MMMM

Thanks a lot folks...look what you all caused.

Signed,

Happy, content, with glutteny and a full tummy. )

"One Hundred Years From Now It Will Not Matter What My Bank Account Was, What Kind of House I lived in, or What Kind of Car I Drove, But the World May Be A Better Place Because I Was Important in the Life of A Child."

LIFES PHILOSOPHY: Love, Live, Laugh

hmmm - as it appears if you are eating good food with the ones you love you will be living life to its fullest, surely laughing and smiling throughout!!!

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I find the canned cheese has a sour-milk taste to it.

That may be due to age of the can in question. I have been to friend's houses where the 4c or Kraft is really, REALLY old - maybe pre-grated doesn't age as gracefully? Or, perhaps I just can't taste that sour-ness!

I think the parmagiano is milder than the pecorino romano because the romano is a sheep's milk cheese. The romano has more of a "bite" to it.

That makes sense in general. As someon mentioned before, there are probably mild and sharper variations of both cow and sheep varieties.

Well, I'm off to search for a good Parmagiano Reggiano - after hearing all the descriptions, my mouth is watering.

(But I don't think I'll get rid of the green can....)

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