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La Cocina de Los Postres


aidensnd
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  • 2 weeks later...

While we are talking about this book, I have a question about a similar one.

Does anybody have, or seen the content of, the Paco Torreblanco book? I had never even heard of him or his book until I got the fall catalog of JB prince where they do a very good job of highlighting it.

I want to get it, or the book in which this thread is about, but spending $199.00 on a book ( to which my wife replied - Are you going to use it everyday? - if not I can't see spending that much on a book!) that is only going to sit on my bookshelf collecting dust, isn't practical to me.

Worse comes to worse I can wait till the end of November till I go back to NY for Thanksgiving when I am going to try ( for the 2nd Time ) to get to JB Prince and/or Culinary Arts and Letters in the city ( Food poisoning dashed my plans last year )

Thanks,

Jason

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I have the torreblanca book. There are some cool things that I use like pate de fruit using nh pectin, a good goat cheese ice cream recipe which someone here as posted, all in all some very nice things. worth 200 bucks? depends on your skill level and the other books in your collection. I'd be happy to answer any specific questions. back to work I go.

www.adrianvasquez.net

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I have the Torreblanca book and it is very impressive. Lots of interesting recipes and presentation ideas. The translation seems to be fairly clear and it comes with a separate paperback volume with just the recipes so you don't have to take the big, pretty book into the kitchen. That said, it has mostly sat on my shelf while I turn much more frequently to others such as Herme, Balaguer, Ryon, Bras, etc. After living with it for awhile, I just haven't found specific recipes that are so unique or compelling that I've added them to my "toolbox".

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Thanks xdrixn and Neil for your responses.

I guess what I was getting at was answered by Neil, that Herme, Balaguer , and Bau's books are in the same category as Torreblanco, but that theirs are more

" usable " for pastry chefs.

That being said, if you could pick only one ( either Herme's, Bau's or Balaguer's books) which would it be , based on its content and, more importantly, based on the amount of usable content ( basically - which do you go to the most for ideas and recipes?)

Thank you all again

Jason

P.S. I should add, I am looking to improve upon my plated desserts, sugar and chocolate work, as well as entrement ideas, if that helps.

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mckayinutah,pardon me for being brief. If i made more cakes I would refer to the herme book more. I think the the torreblanca book is more rounded, covering ganache, ice cream, some bread, entrements etc. HOWEVER, the balaguer book has a lot of theory and I refer to it often. just my two cents.

www.adrianvasquez.net

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mckayinutah,pardon me for being brief.  If i made more cakes I would refer to the herme book more.  I think the the torreblanca book is more rounded, covering ganache, ice cream, some bread, entrements etc.  HOWEVER, the balaguer book has a lot of theory and I refer to it often.  just my two cents.

Thank you Xdrixn.

I didn't realize who you were until I saw that you have a website and checked it out for myself. Very nice stuff.

I appreciate your input on these books; it has been very helpful to me.

Jason

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