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PakePorkChop

Italian Bread in Hawaii

11 posts in this topic

I'm looking for airy ciabatta and nice hardy crusts.

No one is responding so I will have to resort to a Bobby Flay throw-down here.

Both Antonio's Pizza and La Pizza Rina use Italian rolls from Daily Bread Bakery on King Street. Does that not suggest that this is the best Italian roll in Hawaii?

For ciabatta, Patisserie. St. Germain's is a little dry.

While we're at it, best French bread is at St. Germain, followed by Bale. The crust of the French bread at Daily Bread is a little gummy.

Agree? Disagree?

Chew. Discuss.

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I agree about the French bread from St. Germain and Bale. I used to get my Italian bread from Donato's restaurant in Manoa (I'd call them and they'd sell me a few loaves), but sadly that is no more. I'm not a ciabatta fan so can't answer to that!


SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

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Aloha, Suzy!

I knew that I could count on you!

Quick questions: Why is Donato's bread no longer available to you? Why are you not a fan of chiabatta?

On a separate note, glossyp and I agree that we are long overdue for an egullet "chew the fat" session.

We know that you are way over there in Mililani. Is there any date, time, and place that is more convenient for you than others?

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I agree completely regarding

1) an eGullet get together

2) St Germaine French Bread

Donato's closed its doors in February and that's why bread is no longer available from them.

I bake Italian breads like ciabatta at home (when the weather cools off allowing for more tolerable baking conditions) using Peter Reinhardt's bread book 'The Breadbaker's Apprentice' as reference. Just for giggles here is a link to a post with photos of my first attempt at ciabatta.


"Eat it up, wear it out, make it do or do without." TMJ Jr. R.I.P.

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On a separate note, glossyp and I agree that we are long overdue for an egullet "chew the fat" session.

We know that you are way over there in Mililani.  Is there any date, time, and place that is more convenient for you than others?

Last I recall, there are special rules that need to be followed for an "offical" eGullet get-together, and this board no longer seems to have a dedicated moderator since SKChai resigned...

I'll PM you, but weren't you just asking about soul food places (like Molly's Smokehouse in Wahiawa)? I also haven't yet tried the new Cuban place in Chinatown. Have either of you?


SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

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Don't know if you've done it already, but if you haven't I'd love to do a get-together if I'm in town (I travel a lot for work). Let me know...my wife and I are both members!!! We've got some questions and opinions we'd like to share with those who have watched the culinary landscape evolve here on the island.

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I would be interested in participating in the get together also if y'all don't mind.


user posted image

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Well it looks like we have a few interested. As SuzySushi suggested, perhaps we need to go offline to organize. Can someone volunteer to help coordinate? I'm buried with projects and deadlines or I'd offer. I will be there though - there's always time to eat!


"Eat it up, wear it out, make it do or do without." TMJ Jr. R.I.P.

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it may be too obvious, but costco does sell the par baked/fresh baked la brea bakery breads and some grace baking loaves as well. they finish them in house and are often warm. these are pretty traditional french loaves with a decent crust and crumb :smile:

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Thanks for all your suggestions and referrals!

In regard to getting together, email me at

anthonychang@hawaii.rr.com

and we will find a venue and a date.

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