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barbhealy

vialone nano pestelli

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I just bought some of this rice from www.gustiamo.com and have looked EVERYWHERE for a recipe! After searching this site and reading all the other threads on risotto (which, incidentally, resulted in what DH termed 'my best risotto yet') I found references to it ("it will take longer to cook and taste better") but no recipes.

In desperation, last night I decided to try using it in a 'regular' risotto recipe and chose 'Pancetta, Tomato, and Peas' from Judith Barrett and Norma Wasserman's RISOTTO, my favorite risotto cookbook. I suspect that something with mushrooms would work better with the rustic rice but DH won't eat them.

It was our meal. No other meat or vegetable was served.

I used a very light chicken broth as the liquid. The rice required a bit more liquid than the recipe asked for and it did take slightly longer to cook than superfino arborio. It had more "tooth" and was a bit less creamy with very distinct grains. The color is also richer.

DH proclaimed it a success - not better or worse than risotto made with arborio or carnaroli but different. In his words, it was "company fare", worthy of serving to guests, but not as good as the 'best risotto yet'. That one was Risotto con Fagioli, also from the above mentioned book. I had suggested making the same recipe using this rice but he wanted to try something new so the comparison isn't really fair. He LOVES beans!

Anyway, we will definitely be cooking this rice again, but....I was wondering whether anyone had recipes or cooking tips specifically for it. I have at least 25 Italian cookbooks, including The Silver Spoon (the italian joy of cooking) but not one of them even mentions this rice.

Barb Healy

www.ooakfolk.com

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I think the nano is used for delicate seafood risottos from Venice.

.


Edited by Wolfert (log)

“C’est dans les vieux pots, qu’on fait la bonne soupe!”, or ‘it is in old pots that good soup is made’.

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You don't need a recipe specifically tailored to the use of this type of rice. Use it for risotto or any of the other Italian rice-based dishes you enjoy that call for a starchy short-grained rice as opposed to one with long grains.

Before internet sales, the domination of Italian cookbooks in the publishing world, and growing specialization of titles devoted to regional cooking, or ones that evoke homey, rural comfort and authenticity, we in the US just had Arborio. Now there's more, including Carnaroli, black rice from Venice, etc. These fuel our desire for something new to consume and distinguish our refined knowledge from that of our neighbors. They're also good.


"Viciousness in the kitchen.

The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

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The first link I found in a search seems as if it may be one of the most informative. It concerns Riso Nano Vialone Veronese, i.e. from basically the same area even if your type is supposed to be particularly coarse and stubby. Some of the recipes reflect Paula Wolfert's advice. Of course, the Veneto is known for risi e bisi; this is from Alberto and omits tomatoes.

With one store located in my home town, Balducci's has recently started to carry three different types of Italian rice, including Vialone. I no longer have the box, so I am not sure of details. However, I paid around $4 for it.


Edited by Pontormo (log)

"Viciousness in the kitchen.

The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

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The first link I found in a search seems as if it may be one of the most informative.  It concerns Riso Nano Vialone Veronese, i.e. from basically the same area even if your type is supposed to be particularly coarse and stubby.  Some of the recipes reflect Paula Wolfert's advice.  Of course, the Veneto is known for risi e bisi; this is from Alberto and omits tomatoes.

I have used the regular vialone nano extensively but I've had no experience with the "pestelli" version which is hulled using pistons, or pestelli, and - as you say - has a coarser, heartier grain than the vialone nano that is generally available.

I chose the recipe I did because of it's similarity to risi e bisi and it was good but I don't think it highlighted the unique characteristics of the rice.

The link you sent was very informative but they, too, do not mention pestelli!

My hope was that someone who has experience with this rice would share some of their 'war stories'. My husband won't eat mushrooms or seafood so perhaps the best way for me to prepare it is simply with an assertive cheese, like taleggio or fontina.

Barb Healy

www.ooakfolk.com

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Look for the traditional recipes of Risotto all'isolana, Risotto alla pilota and Riso al tastasal (very hard you can find outside verona)

Franci, THANK YOU SO MUCH!!!!

I finally found a site with all three of these recipes in English:

http://italianfood.about.com/library/rec/blr0063.htm

risotto recipes

Although I've JUST found this site and haven't tried the recipes, they all sound delicious!

Thanks again!

Barb

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check the site for Gabrielle Ferron of pila vecia, this is where I first saw it being made in the family business.

he also teaches, ahs some recipes online.

Divina, your site was one of the ones I found in my search for Risotto All'Isolana!

Florence is my favorite city on earth - you are so lucky to live there.... I boomarked your site for our next trip.

Barb

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vialone nano has a slightly different starch composition than the other risotto rices and it cooks up a little "soupier", which is what beloved paula was referring to. the venetians like their risotto "all'onda", so it can swirl in the bowl.

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the venetians like their risotto "all'onda", so it can swirl in the bowl.

You know, I was just thinking about the risotto I had in Croatia (on the coast), which is also pretty soupy. Which makes sense now, given the Venetian influence there.

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vialone nano has a slightly different starch composition than the other risotto rices and it cooks up a little "soupier", which is what beloved paula was referring to. the venetians like their risotto "all'onda", so it can swirl in the bowl.

Thanks, Russ. But, as I've said in my previous posts, I am familiar with regular vialone nano!

I'm looking for recipes/advice for vialone nano PESTELLI which is DIFFERENT than vialone nano in that it's hulled with pistons and is coarser than normal vialone nano.

The recipes Franci recommended come closer to what I imagined would work with this grain but none of them list PESTELLI specifically as an ingredient....

I'm still hoping that someonw who has cooked PESTELLI will share their experiences....

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check the site for Gabrielle Ferron of pila vecia, this is where I first saw it being made in the family business.

he also teaches, ahs some recipes online.

Divina, your site was one of the ones I found in my search for Risotto All'Isolana!

Florence is my favorite city on earth - you are so lucky to live there.... I boomarked your site for our next trip.

Barb

p.s. I did go to Gabrielle Ferron's site the the only recipes in English were the three that Franci recommended, none of which specifically listed PESTELLI as the rice required.

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Next week when I am back in Florence I will pick up the info sheet on the rice where I buy mine and let you know.

I think it has a longer cooking time.. but that is all.

When I met Gabrielle, he taught me to make risotto without stirring as stirring breaks up the rice.

so his technique is more pilaf style.

saute with onion or shallot then toast rice add liquid, cover and cook for 14 minutes

then uncover stir and add additional liquid to creat creaminess.

On my site is his recipe for risotto all'isolana with meats and cinnamon traditional from his village.

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Next week when I am back in Florence I will pick up the info sheet on the rice where I buy mine and let you know.

I think it has a longer cooking time.. but that is all.

When I met Gabrielle, he taught me to make risotto without stirring as stirring breaks up the rice.

so his technique is more pilaf style.

saute with onion or shallot then toast rice add  liquid, cover and cook for 14 minutes

then uncover stir and add additional liquid to creat creaminess.

On my site is his recipe for risotto all'isolana with meats and cinnamon traditional from his village.

Thank you!

I've already printed out the recipe on your site and was going to try it tonight.

I just noticed these is a recipe on the side of the bag the rice came in, with mushroooms, but it's in Italian! I should be able to decipher it using bablefish....and DH will be out of town on Monday so I'll give it a try!

Thanks again,

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Just got an email back from the Ferron people ( Italians are slow on email!)

they said that the rice is more flavorful having the husk.. and only takes a few more mintues of cooking time.. 2 or three!

enjoy his recipe . the cinnamon is traditional and makes a really special risotto!

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Sometimes you just have to ask! Here's a reply from a very gracious representative of gustiamo.com:

Sorry about the delay. I have been busy chasing down our producer Gazzani to hear what he thought was the best way to use pestelli and if any traditional recipe calling exclusively for pestelli even existed. His sister, who apparently spends more time at the stove testing the rice, told me that the most common recipe for pestelli in Veneto is "Risotto Tastasal", made with ground pork meat: the ground pork is sauteed in butter and olive oil; when the meat is browned, she adds white wine, salt and pepper, and finally pestelli rice which you would finish cooking as in a traditional risotto recipe, adding stock gradually to the rice until ready.

I instinctively use straightforward, strongly flavored ingredients which would naturally stand up to the robust texture of pestelli rice. I use pestelli to make risotto with herbs (a mix of rosemary, sage, basil and thyme with the addition of a little lemon rind) and I'm very happy with the results. Also I'm thinking of peasant, uncomplicated, comforting dishes and I reach for pestelli...

"Le Ricette Regionali Italiane" by Anna Gosetti della Salda is a great Italian cooking book and source of inspiration for ultra regional risotto recipes and other dishes. Alas, it is in Italian, but we can help with the translation.

Thank you for the feedback and the suggestions, our recipe section is in the making (and been in the making for a while), hopefully we'll have it ready to go online soon, meanwhile, let me know if you ever need our Italian point of view on anything else.


"Viciousness in the kitchen.

The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

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Just got an email back from the Ferron people ( Italians are slow on email!)

they said that the rice is more flavorful having the husk.. and only takes a few more mintues of cooking time.. 2 or three!

enjoy his recipe . the cinnamon is traditional and makes a really special risotto!

Well, I finally made the Risotto All'Isolana using leftover pork loin (brined in milk and sage and then grilled) and it was absolutely delicious! The cinnamon takes it from good to sublime and we will definitely be making it again!

Thank you!

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Sometimes you just have to ask!  Here's a reply from a very gracious representative of gustiamo.com:
Sorry about the delay. I have been busy chasing down our producer Gazzani to hear what he thought was the best way to use pestelli and if any traditional recipe calling exclusively for pestelli even existed. His sister, who apparently spends more time at the stove testing the rice, told me that the most common recipe for pestelli in Veneto is "Risotto Tastasal", made with ground pork meat: the ground pork is sauteed in butter and olive oil; when the meat is browned, she adds white wine, salt and pepper, and finally pestelli rice which you would finish cooking as in a traditional risotto recipe, adding stock gradually to the rice until ready.

I instinctively use straightforward, strongly flavored ingredients which would naturally stand up to the robust texture of pestelli rice. I use pestelli to make risotto with herbs (a mix of rosemary, sage, basil and thyme with the addition of a little lemon rind) and I'm very happy with the results. Also I'm thinking of peasant, uncomplicated, comforting dishes and I reach for pestelli...

"Le Ricette Regionali Italiane" by Anna Gosetti della Salda is a great Italian cooking book and source of inspiration for ultra regional risotto recipes and other dishes. Alas, it is in Italian, but we can help with the translation.

Thank you for the feedback and the suggestions, our recipe section is in the making (and been in the making for a while), hopefully we'll have it ready to go online soon, meanwhile, let me know if you ever need our Italian point of view on anything else.

LOL! Pontormo, you must have more clout with Beatrice than I do because I DID ask and was told, "No, they didn't have any recipes specifically for pestelli." So, thank you for using your influence! I added the book to my list of things to track down and will try the risotto with herbs and lemon rind next....

THANK YOU!!!!

Barb

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No clout, just better luck. Beatrice was not the name of the person who replied and as I said, she was extremely gracious as is evident in her reply. Report back should you be really pleased with results.


"Viciousness in the kitchen.

The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

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