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What classic dish is due for a revival?


Pat Churchill
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And how about daiquiris? Remember them? And 'frozen daiquiri parties'?

Daiquiris were everybody's favorite party drink until they got shoved aside by that sassy lass from Mexico, Margarita.

:cool:

Edited by Jaymes (log)

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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chicken and dumplings--nothing fancied up about it--I think just seasoned with salt and pepper and possibly an onion--one of my favorite dishes cooked by my mother--she grew up in Colorado, but her family seemed to cook more Southern than Western--I remember all the great aunts' fried chicken and mashed potatoes like a dream.

As for revivals--I've made rumaki a few times for parties and people just gobble them up--whether they remeber them or not they are always a hit.

Zoe

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Chicken Kiev or Chicken Maryland.  Those were on the menu in almost any family restaurant when I was growing up.

Maryland Chicken was the first dish I ever cooked, when I was I think 9. I don't know what recipe I used, but I remember liking the results and being complimented by my parents, who I doubt would have told me they liked it if they didn't.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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....

As for revivals--I've made rumaki a few times for parties and people just gobble them up--whether they remeber them or not they are always a hit.

Zoe

:smile: I made bacon horseradish dip for before Thanksgiving dinner last year and it was also a big hit!

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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I do see quiche. Problem is, much of it tastes like it's been made with skim milk.

Since relocating to Mexico City from New York city the yen for certain foods has been growing. So for Mexican Independence Day ("El Grito") Sept.15 decided to do several Quiches a la Mexicana!

The following are the ingredients used in each:

1. rajas (slices of roasted poblano chiles), sundried tomatoes and sauteed onions.

2. sauteed zucchini flower blossms and sauteed onions. (green chiles could also be added but then you lose the delicate flavor of the blooms).

3. with crumbled chorizo and rajas.

And of course with HEAVY CREAM! :rolleyes:

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I do see quiche. Problem is, much of it tastes like it's been made with skim milk.

Since relocating to Mexico City from New York city the yen for certain foods has been growing. So for Mexican Independence Day ("El Grito") Sept.15 decided to do several Quiches a la Mexicana!

The following are the ingredients used in each:

1. rajas (slices of roasted poblano chiles), sundried tomatoes and sauteed onions.

2. sauteed zucchini flower blossms and sauteed onions. (green chiles could also be added but then you lose the delicate flavor of the blooms).

3. with crumbled chorizo and rajas.

And of course with HEAVY CREAM! :rolleyes:

And how could I forget the nights big favorite; huitlacoche quiche with a touch of finely grated queso oaxaca!

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This IS a great thread!

I'd love for Lobster Thermidor and Lobster Newburgh to make a comeback as well.

Lobster Thermidor, Beef Wellington and Seafood (mixed-- scallops, shrimp and lobster meat) Newburg are all on the menu at the Manor in West Orange, NJ. They also still do "old school style" table side caesar salads, chateaubriand, etc. Yes I work there, but considering these things are almost extinct, I had to point it out.

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I am in total agreement on rumaki. Teryaki and waterchesnut and bacon. Everyone loves food on toothpicks and chicken livers are cheap! Just don't mention liver when passing them to the guests. People like to prejudge.

Also Lobster Newburg, etc.

When I was a kid I adored something my mother used to make for company, this wicked broccoli and chicken something called Chicken Divan. May have had velveeta for all I know but it was AWESOME. At least it seemed so 25 years ago.

I also love those cheeseballs people would make for parties. A mess of cream cheese, cheddar, etc. mixed rolled into a ball and then rolled in chopped nuts and/or herbs. Mom made one for every party.

"Well, there's egg and bacon; egg sausage and bacon; egg and spam; egg bacon and spam; egg bacon sausage and spam; spam bacon sausage and spam; spam egg spam spam bacon and spam; spam sausage spam spam bacon spam tomato and spam; spam spam spam egg and spam; spam spam spam spam spam spam baked beans spam spam spam or Lobster Thermidor a Crevette with a mornay sauce served in a Provencale manner with shallots and aubergines garnished with truffle pate, brandy and with a fried egg on top and spam. "

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  • 3 years later...

Chicken Cordon Bleu?

For weeks I've been whacking away at the six-plus kg log of Larsen's Ham in my fridge. I flattened a pair of homegrown chicken breasts, sprinkled liberally with generic Swiss cheese, and stuffed with ham. Into the fish cage and onto the grill, it was not at all bad.

I certainly wasn't trying to revive a classic, but this episode reminded me of how many recipes we-all have stuffed away in our brains. There really aren't many truly original dishes. Maybe when a new ingredient comes about, or when a technology transfers over to the kitchen.

101_4897.jpg

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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Chicken Kiev or Chicken Maryland.  Those were on the menu in almost any family restaurant when I was growing up.

Maryland Chicken was the first dish I ever cooked, when I was I think 9. I don't know what recipe I used, but I remember liking the results and being complimented by my parents, who I doubt would have told me they liked it if they didn't.

Chicken Maryland sounds fascinating - the chicken is pan fried instead of deep fried? And sometimes comes with hush puppies? Does anyone have a recipe or methodology they'd care to share?

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After watching one of those food shows last night I am on the souffle train again. I think the topic was for a major chef to discuss the best cheese dish they ever ate. Someone mentioned a super cheesy souffle. I have Julia Vol 1 and I did the spinach souffle as a complete novice so I think this is on the agenda again, especially since I have an oven that is correctly calibrated!

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