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Octoberfest Recipes


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We're looking for recipes for an Octoberfest celebration we will be attending.

Are there traditional must-haves (other than beer, of course) for celebrating Octoberfest.

Any secret family traditions/recipes? Classic, etc. You get the picture. Any help would be most appreciated!

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

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goulash?

don't know if it's 100% authentic Oktoberfest food, but it's always one of my favorite things to eat in germany and it's a great hangover "cure" either way.

mark

EDIT: I have to say, the further east I go, usually on my way to the Austrian-Hungarian border, the more I enjoy this soup (seems to be more caraway involved eastward, maybe it's just been my luck)...i'd look for a recipe that skews Austrian....

Edited by markemorse (log)
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Guide plus recipes for an Oktoberfest celebration ...

keep it authentic with genuine German food and beverages. Bavarian cheeses. Black Forest Hams and Westphalian breads. Tangy mustards, pickles and sauerkraut. Legendary brews, Riesling wines and refreshing mineral waters.
Edited by Gifted Gourmet (log)

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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Blaukraut

Hunter style steak

Spaetzle

Herb/veal broth with quenelles of some sort of forcemeat (a little organ meat in there for flavor)

Blutwurst

Jägerschnitzel in Champignonsoße

Sauerbraten

Meat with a plum-red wine sauce

lentil stew

kartoffelsuppe

Reibekuchen (potato pancakes)

Not really german (turkish actually), but germany has been inundated with shops selling Donner Kebabs

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Lebkuchenhertzen (Lebkuchen Hearts or German Spice Cookie Hearts)

These are typically decorated with royal icing, white and other colors and often have a message on them, like "I love you", "Be Mine", etc.

Here is a nice photo of a display of lebkuchen hearts: click

Here are some Lebkuchen recipes click and click

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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Lebkuchenhertzen  (Lebkuchen Hearts or German Spice Cookie Hearts)

These are typically decorated with royal icing, white and other colors and often have a message on them, like "I love you", "Be Mine", etc.

Here is a nice photo of a display of lebkuchen hearts: click

Here are some Lebkuchen recipes click and click

Where can I get the oblaten (wafer bottoms) for the lebkuchen in the USA???

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One of my favorites is a braised pork shank, with a jus of cider, a touch of verjus, aromatics, and a late harvest riesling-braised red cabbage and bacon.

I find marzens, with the malty sweetness and just a nod of hop bitterness, go great with the meal.

-Paul

 

Remplis ton verre vuide; Vuide ton verre plein. Je ne puis suffrir dans ta main...un verre ni vuide ni plein. ~ Rabelais

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Lebkuchenhertzen  (Lebkuchen Hearts or German Spice Cookie Hearts)

These are typically decorated with royal icing, white and other colors and often have a message on them, like "I love you", "Be Mine", etc.

Here is a nice photo of a display of lebkuchen hearts: click

Here are some Lebkuchen recipes click and click

Where can I get the oblaten (wafer bottoms) for the lebkuchen in the USA???

My mom used to get them at a German/Austrian deli back East, so if you have anything like that around you it would be a place to check. I found two online sources that looks promising here: click and click

Edited by ludja (log)

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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I'm thinking of reviving my Oktoberfest "thing" that I've held for my family in year's past, but I'm not going to be tied to "authentic German" food, because my "German" food has always had a more continental influence. Some of it's Austrian, some of it's Hungarian, some of it's Polish...and no one ever complains.

But I'll probably smoke and grill some weisswurst and bratwurst, maybe make a pork roast with mushroom gravy, might haul out the spaetzle maker or just make some potatoes with paprika and onion (my spaetzle generally's a disaster, anyway), maybe an apple cake or a ricotta cheesecake. It's more about celebrating fall, having a nice German beer or wine, and eating way too much.

From a recipe standpoint, I'm not much help, because even when I have one, I just don't stick to it.

And our local German restaurant here in Wichita, Imbiss Grille, has donner kebab on the menu, so it's spread to even here.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

“A favorite dish in Kansas is creamed corn on a stick.”

-Jeff Harms, actor, comedian.

>Enjoying every bite, because I don't know any better...

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I haven't tried this recipe yet, but have had it marked on my list to make ever since Redsugar posted it. It seems like a great old-fashioned German apple cake. Maybe this fall is the right time for me to try it... :smile:

Here's the link to Redsugar's post: click

I’d like to share my interpretation of Apple Crumb Kuchen – certainly a thoroughly valid example of a bread-cake hybrid.  Long before the culinary use of baking powder or soda, bakers were mixing cakes from sweetened yeast-raised dough and topping them with fruit & sugar.  The following recipe yields two kuchens – one for today and the other to reserve in the freezer.

Kuchens:

½ tsp granulated sugar

2 fl. oz. lukewarm water

1 Tbsp active dry yeast

8 ounces butter

¾ cup granulated sugar

3 large eggs

zest of small lemon

8 fl. oz. sour cream

¼ tsp salt

approx. 4 cups flour

1 quart peeled, cored & thinly sliced apples (I use Cortland or Northern Spy)

Crumble Topping:

1 cup flour

½ cup firmly packed light-brown sugar

2 tsp ground cinnamon

5½ ounces cold butter

Dissolve ½ tsp sugar in water; sprinkle yeast over; let stand 5 minutes, the stir briskly with fork.

Cream butter & sugar.  Beat in eggs individually, then lemon zest.  Stir in sour cream, yeast mixture, and salt.  Gradually incorporate the flour to make a soft dough.  Cover loosely with plastic wrap & slightly dampened tea towel; set in warm place to rise until doubled in volume.

Deflate dough; divide in half.  Press evenly into 2 greased 13- x 9- inch cake pans.  Cover pans loosely with plastic wrap and let rise until almost doubled.

Arrange apples in rows over surface of each kuchen.  Sprinkle half of crumble topping over each kuchen and then distribute almonds on top.  Let rise 15 minutes longer.

Bake in 375° oven for 15 minutes; reduce heat to 325° and bake for 20 to 30 minutes, or until crumble is browned and kuchen has separated from sides of pan.

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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Lebkuchenhertzen  (Lebkuchen Hearts or German Spice Cookie Hearts)

These are typically decorated with royal icing, white and other colors and often have a message on them, like "I love you", "Be Mine", etc.

Here is a nice photo of a display of lebkuchen hearts: click

Here are some Lebkuchen recipes click and click

Where can I get the oblaten (wafer bottoms) for the lebkuchen in the USA???

My mom used to get them at a German/Austrian deli back East, so if you have anything like that around you it would be a place to check. I found two online sources that looks promising here: click and click

Thank upi so much!!!

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