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Carolyn Tillie

Spice Cake recipes

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Ling - I tried your spice cake adapation today. I'm not a very good baker of sweet things, but it sounded great and I had everything on hand. I subsituted 5 spice powder for the cloves and the nutmeg, and it turned out delicious! I had a warm peice with a tiny scoop of vanilla icecream and some Jack Daniels / Cream Soda jelly, since making caramel intimidates me.

I think this recipe would be great with some orange zest, too, or maybe some kind of orange marmalade topping. It sort of cries out for citrus to me.

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^I'm glad you liked it. :smile: I can't say spice cake is one of my favourite cakes on its own...I definitely think it needs a nice ladle of warm caramel (preferably boozy). Did you make the Jack Daniels/Cream Soda jelly yourself, or is it a commercial product?

I think the spice cake would also go nicely with Pierre Herme's lemon cream recipe.


Edited by Ling (log)

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Did you make the Jack Daniels/Cream Soda jelly yourself, or is it a commercial product?

I made the jelly. It's basically 10 oz of cream soda, 2 oz of Jack, and 3 cups of sugar boiled with some liquid pectin and then jarred. It makes a wonderfully white trash ice cream topping if you melt it a bit. :raz:

I think spice cake makes a better breakfast than a dessert.

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I think this belong to this thread .

I have been thinking of a chai cake for a while , then the other day I found a recipe on a magazine.

I got the idea reading this thread as well , I wanted a chai cake that was more like a spiced cake , moist and spicy with a distinct chai taste.

I came out with a formula , that i still need to tweek a little bit ,that wasnt bad at all.

The only real problem I had was , silly me , beating the batter too long so I got tunneling ( thats how is it called?) big holes through the cake .

The frosting is a white chocolate ganache with garam masala and spiced rum .oh yumm,very delicate and a very very yummy chai taste in it.

Need to work on the cake more , but was a great experiment even my husband , that usually is not fan of cakes , really really liked :wub:

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Edited by Desiderio (log)

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Thank you Kate!

Definately need to work on that one ,my skills as american style cake maker , has still a way to go :raz: .

This is the second attempt to make a chai cake that was similar to a spiced cake moister and a nice fine crumb.

The smell of this cake in the house is intoxicating and the flavor is nice and spicy from the Masala .

gallery_44494_2801_22824.jpg


Edited by Desiderio (log)

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Carolyn, I do not have a recipe but have you tried the Viet Nam cinnamon???? Oh my soul, it is sooooo good!!! I've seen it at the major grocery stores labeled as Saigon cinnamon put out by Durkee or McCormack or something. I got mine off of King Arthur's. Just tremendous flavor - sort of a muted red hot cinnamon burst. Just really worth your while if you're doing spice stuff.

You could just take a regular recipe that you like & put in that cinnamon alone for an A+ gold star cake! Way good!

I wholeheartedly concur. Vietnamese cinnamon is THE spiciest! And, it's not a sweet cinnamon,

so it could be used in savory recipes (I'm hardpressed to think of one right now). I sprinkle it on my morning latte every day, too! If anyone is interested, it can be bought at Penzey's, or

in NYC at Aphrodesia, a fantastic herb and spice store.

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Carolyn, I do not have a recipe but have you tried the Viet Nam cinnamon???? Oh my soul, it is sooooo good!!! I've seen it at the major grocery stores labeled as Saigon cinnamon put out by Durkee or McCormack or something. I got mine off of King Arthur's. Just tremendous flavor - sort of a muted red hot cinnamon burst. Just really worth your while if you're doing spice stuff.

You could just take a regular recipe that you like & put in that cinnamon alone for an A+ gold star cake! Way good!

I wholeheartedly concur. Vietnamese cinnamon is THE spiciest! And, it's not a sweet cinnamon,

so it could be used in savory recipes (I'm hardpressed to think of one right now).

We use it on salmon sometimes.

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Carolyn, I do not have a recipe but have you tried the Viet Nam cinnamon???? Oh my soul, it is sooooo good!!! I've seen it at the major grocery stores labeled as Saigon cinnamon put out by Durkee or McCormack or something. I got mine off of King Arthur's. Just tremendous flavor - sort of a muted red hot cinnamon burst. Just really worth your while if you're doing spice stuff.

You could just take a regular recipe that you like & put in that cinnamon alone for an A+ gold star cake! Way good!

I wholeheartedly concur. Vietnamese cinnamon is THE spiciest! And, it's not a sweet cinnamon,

so it could be used in savory recipes (I'm hardpressed to think of one right now).

We use it on salmon sometimes.

Salmon....delicious! I now remember that I use it in all my Moroccan-esque recipes...like chick-pea soup, and lemon chicken. Also K8, I agree with you on lemon in the cream cheese frosting! I've tasted orange cream cheese frosting on a gingerbread cake, and didn't care for it. Too strong an orange flavor for me, instead of that bright citrus-y taste I go for. Try infusing

star anise in cream when you do a ganache, be it a chocolate ganache, mocha or caramel. It's fabulous!

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Also K8, I agree with you on lemon in the cream cheese frosting!  I've tasted orange cream cheese frosting on a gingerbread cake, and didn't care for it.  Too strong an orange flavor for me, instead of that bright citrus-y taste I go for.  Try infusing

star anise in cream when you do a ganache, be it a chocolate ganache, mocha or caramel.  It's fabulous!

I am going to try that star anise thing for truffles. Thanks for the idea. I'm doing some green tea ones too.

And yes the lemon disappears in the cream cheeses stuff and it becomes something else that's really delicious. But the orange just tastes orangey and that's not bad but it's orange cream cheese. Anway. Each to their own...and ours is better. :raz:

I have a t-shirt that says, "One Tough Cookie". :laugh:

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My goodness... I had forgotten about this thread! I started it way back when I ate sweets every day. Now, 60-pounds lighter, it is making me that cake that I never quite achieved!

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Also K8, I agree with you on lemon in the cream cheese frosting!  I've tasted orange cream cheese frosting on a gingerbread cake, and didn't care for it.  Too strong an orange flavor for me, instead of that bright citrus-y taste I go for.   Try infusing

star anise in cream when you do a ganache, be it a chocolate ganache, mocha or caramel.  It's fabulous!

I am going to try that star anise thing for truffles. Thanks for the idea. I'm doing some green tea ones too.

And yes the lemon disappears in the cream cheeses stuff and it becomes something else that's really delicious. But the orange just tastes orangey and that's not bad but it's orange cream cheese. Anway. Each to their own...and ours is better. :raz:

I have a t-shirt that says, "One Tough Cookie". :laugh:

I agree....has anyone tested lime in cream cheese frosting? I'll bet that's great, too. I always, put lemon juice in my royal icing because it cuts the sweetness, and helps the royal set up nicely. I have found myself out of lemons and have substituted lime. DELISH!

I have a baseball t-shirt that says One Tough Cookie, too! :cool:

But, to make this relevant to spice cake, Penzeys also has a "cake spice" blend that I used when

I worked with another baker. We just added it to vanilla cake, and it was surprisingly good!

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On 9/6/2006 at 12:42 AM, MichelleGL said:

I have a wedding cake coming up in a couple weeks for 50 people. They requested spice cake with cream cheese frosting. That's the first request I've ever had for a spice cake wedding cake and I don't have many recipes. (I do have one recipe, from an old Sylvia Weinstock book. I'll try that one this week.)

Anybody have a good one? Or two? I have tasting with the bride and groom in less than two weeks! Help!

Hi MichelleGL

Will you please share the spice cake recipe with me? I am on a hunt for one. Thank you

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