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Carolyn Tillie

Spice Cake recipes

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I also have a recipe that FoodMan passed on to me, which includes jam in the batter, I can post some recipes later if desired.

Yes, please! My recipe for cake with jam invariably ends up with jam only on the bottom of the cake. :blink: Any other recipes you feel like passing on would be good, too.

Around here, we like cake a lot. Any way, any kind, as long as it's tasty.

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Was digging through some old recipes the other day and came across this. Don't know if you're still searching and whether or not this is of interest, but thought I'd add it just in case. Also, haven't made it in a while and can't remember much about it, other than at the time we thought it was quite good. But I was young in those days, and thought LOTS of things were 'quite good.' :biggrin:

You said no icing and no nuts and this recipe calls for icing with nuts, but I recall that sometimes I made it as a sheet cake, and served it with a rum sauce made from Captain Morgan's spiced rum instead of the brown sugar icing.

SPICE CAKE WITH BROWN SUGAR ICING

1 stick unsalted butter, softened

2 C sugar

3 large eggs, separated

1 t vanilla

1 T cinnamon

1 T ground cloves

2 T cocoa powder

1 t baking soda

2 C all-purpose flour

1 C buttermilk

Grease 2 round cakepans. Line with waxed paper, and butter and flour paper. Cream butter and sugar until fluffy. Beat in yolks 1 at a time. Add vanilla. Sift together the dry ingredients. Alternating between the two, slowly add dry ingredients and buttermilk to butter mixture, beating after each addition to incorporate. Whip egg whites to stiff peaks. Stir in 1/4 of egg whites, then slowly fold in remainder. Pour into pans and bake at 350 30-35 minutes. Cool & invert.

Icing:

2 C packed dark brown sugar

1 C buttermilk

1 1/2 sticks unsalted butter

1 t baking soda

1 t vanilla

1 C chopped, toasted nuts

Boil all ingredients except vanilla and nuts to 236 on candy therm. Off heat, beat with wooden spoon until it loses its sheen. Add vanilla and nuts and QUICKLY frost top of one layer. Then add other layer and frost all.


Edited by Jaymes (log)

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I have a wedding cake coming up in a couple weeks for 50 people. They requested spice cake with cream cheese frosting. That's the first request I've ever had for a spice cake wedding cake and I don't have many recipes. (I do have one recipe, from an old Sylvia Weinstock book. I'll try that one this week.)

Anybody have a good one? Or two? I have tasting with the bride and groom in less than two weeks! Help!

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Two little details that will make a big difference and a third that is a maybe.

One is use saigon cinnamon :biggrin: (I'm an addict, see K8 chop with the razor blade and roll the dollar bill...) :laugh:

Two is use lemon juice in your cream cheese stuff.

Three is if you're trying stuff, use some coffee in your liquids for the cake--even flavored coffee--it twists the taste to another level. And what I've figured out for myself for flavored coffees is that if they list more than one flavor, avoid it. Like chocolate vanilla hazelnut. If they list one flavor that's good. Like Apricot, that's cool. Or if it's a seasonal blend for some reason after having thrown out lots of flavored coffee like if it's named Breakfast blend or Christmas blend--those work out better for me anyway.

Target has a line of coffee that probably is not whoopee gourmet or something but it's real dang good and clear, not a cloudly brew kwim? Archer Farms apricot creme tastes to me like it would be perfect for a nice spice cake. It will all blend. I'd try like a quarter cup coffee in it substitued for equal amount of liquid. If you're testing stuff that is. I wouldn't want enough to make it a mocha, just enough to put a happy question mark in your mouth--'ooh that's good, wonder what that flavor is'.

Y'know what else would be good? A dash of baby applesauce would really mellow it all out too.

Just some spice cake musings.

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Do they want a traditional American spice cake or a Carribean spice cake (traditional for weddings)? I 've had the latter an it was so good I dream of it. rummy rum rum.

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Do they want a traditional American spice cake or a Carribean spice cake (traditional for weddings)? I 've had the latter an it was so good I dream of it. rummy rum rum.

Do you have a favorite recipe for the Caribbean spice cake? :smile:

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Do they want a traditional American spice cake or a Carribean spice cake (traditional for weddings)? I 've had the latter an it was so good I dream of it. rummy rum rum.

Do you have a favorite recipe for the Caribbean spice cake? :smile:

I wish, as soon as I get one...it's on!!!!!! I heard it takes about a month though.

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Two is use lemon juice in your cream cheese stuff.

Spice cakes :wub: .

I prefer orange in the icing - orange and spice together is wonderful.

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Do they want a traditional American spice cake or a Carribean spice cake (traditional for weddings)? I 've had the latter an it was so good I dream of it. rummy rum rum.

Do you have a favorite recipe for the Caribbean spice cake? :smile:

I wish, as soon as I get one...it's on!!!!!! I heard it takes about a month though.

Yeah, I did a search for some Caribbean spice cake recipes. The ones I found were basic spice case, but with lime zest added, which is interesting, but not all that unusual. I assume you are talking about something completely different.

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Any of you game to try this traditional Indonesian spice cake (called Kueh Lapis)? Very fragrant. I used to make this (to a slightly different/tweaked recipe), years ago. A little time-consuming, what with having to bake it a layer at a time, but if anyone does try it, I'd LOVE to see what you think... and pics!

The "rempah kueh" spice in the recipe is just mixed spices (but I usually kick up the amount of spices and add extra cinnamon). The kueh lapis press referred to, is just to help press down and even out each cake layer - you could just use anything flat to remove the bubbles in each baked layer.

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Two is use lemon juice in your cream cheese stuff.

Spice cakes :wub: .

I prefer orange in the icing - orange and spice together is wonderful.

Ditto -- same for with a carrot cake. A little zest, a little juice. Mmmm...

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I like it so much with the lemon, I can hardly bring myself to try the orange. But umm, here's my question, when I do the lemon I cannot taste the lemon or the vanilla distinctly in the finshed product y'know? It just tastes great but I cannot necessarily detect any specific flavor except 'good'. When you do the orange, I'm wondering if you get the orange flavor pulled through or does it just taste 'good' or 'real good' or does it taste 'orangey and real good'?? Which, for sure, cream cheese + orange would be wonderful but...

I could make some but then I'd have to eat it and y'know with my metabolism, it just adheres to my thighs blablabla...

So help me out :raz:

So if it is orangey tasting, I think I would like it for carrot cake filling.


Edited by K8memphis (log)

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I just made the Indonesian Spice Cake (Spekkoek) on Leites website for my office birthday party and it was delicious. The only change I made was that I adjusted and added to the spices:

3 tsp cinnamon

1 tsp nutmeg

1 tsp cloves

1 tsp cardamon

1 tsp ginger

Even though the cake has a lot of butter, it is a light cake. I highly recommend this cake.


Edited by Swisskaese (log)

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I looked at all the recipes in this thread and kind of came up with an amalgamation of all the components I liked from each recipe to come up with this:

gallery_35727_2396_70449.jpg

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Lorna - that looks good enough to eat! What's the sauce? Caramel?

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I looked at all the recipes in this thread and kind of came up with an amalgamation of all the components I liked from each recipe to come up with this:

DEAR GOD, LING! I just licked my computer screen! Talk about food porn.

How did it turn out? Flavor? Texture?


Edited by MichelleGL (log)

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Lorna - that looks good enough to eat! What's the sauce? Caramel?

Yes, it's brandy caramel. :smile:

Michelle: The flavour and texture was nice. The crumb was even (i.e. no holes or anything) and moist. The loaf baked up with a perfect little dome (no cracks), so I was quite pleased!


Edited by Ling (log)

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Michelle: The flavour and texture was nice. The crumb was even (i.e. no holes or anything) and moist. The loaf baked up with a perfect little dome (no cracks), so I was quite pleased!

After your recipe tweaking, what was your final recipe?

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1.5 cups of AP flour, sifted with the following dry ingredients:

1/4 tsp nutmeg

1 tsp cinnamon

1/4 tsp cloves

1/8 tsp black pepper

1 tbsp cocoa

1/2 tsp. baking soda

Cream 1/2 cup + 1 tbsp butter with 1 cup of sugar, and add 2 eggs, mixing well after each one.

Alternate dry ingredients into butter with 1/2 cup buttermilk.

Line loaf pan with parchment and oil sides, place in preheated 350 degree oven for approx. 55 minutes.

The caramel was just sugar, brandy, butter, salt and a bit of cream.

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Like the brandy caramel with the spice cake, Ling.

This recipe wouldn't be the one for a wedding cake but it might fit Carolyn's earlier request: A Chinese Five Spice Angel Food Cake.

This recipe is originally from Tom Douglas (Dahlia Lounge in Seattle) and was published in "Home Food". I've served it with an orange creme anglaise as he suggests and it is very nice.

Here are the ingredients:

1 cup cake flour

1/4 tsp salt

1 tsp Chinese five-spice powder

1 1/4 cups sugar

10 large egg whites, RT

1 tsp cream of tartar

1/2 tsp vanilla extract

1 tsp almond extract

Oven at 350 deg F. Twice, sift together the flour, salt and five spice. Sift sugar in a separate bowl. Beat egg whites and cream of tartar until soft peaks appear. Slowly add in sugar while beating until firm, but not dry peaks are formed. Add extracts in towards the end. Carefully fold flour mixture in using a spatula. Transfer batter to ungreased 10 in tube pan and bake in center of oven for ~ 45 min. Check if finished baking by inserting a toothpick in the center and checking for no crumbs. Remove from oven and invert over a wine bottle and let cool completely.

My notes say to try using some more five spice powder next time.


Edited by ludja (log)

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I just made the Indonesian Spice Cake (Spekkoek) on Leites website for my office birthday party and it was delicious.

Even though the cake has a lot of butter, it is a light cake. I highly recommend this cake.

From the write-up from the link, it looks as thought it's the same thing as the Kueh Lapis I posted, except baked in one pan instead of in layers. It does look gorgeous and impressive in layers.

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1.5 cups of AP flour, sifted with the following dry ingredients:

1/4 tsp nutmeg

1 tsp cinnamon

1/4 tsp cloves

1/8 tsp black pepper

1 tbsp cocoa

1/2 tsp. baking soda

Cream 1/2 cup + 1 tbsp butter with 1 cup of sugar, and add 2 eggs, mixing well after each one.

Alternate dry ingredients into butter with 1/2 cup buttermilk.

Line loaf pan with parchment and oil sides, place in preheated 350 degree oven for approx. 55 minutes.

The caramel was just sugar, brandy, butter, salt and a bit of cream.

Oooh, black pepper and cocoa as spices. Love that. I haven't strayed that far outside the box as I've come up through whatever ranks I could muster. I've mostly been in survivor mode. That sounds so intriguing. And umm, I've learned so much from my own kid, chef-boy, and the internet. I love to get in experiment mode.

Umm, do you grind the pepper so it's real fine or leave it as larger tidbits in there?? And I like the idea of the small batch. That's a long bake for a little loaf.

My hands would shake, my brow would crease and moisten. I'd try real hard but I don't think I could keep from using TWO TEASPOONS OF CINNAMON :wub: OK, maybe just a very fluffy teaspoon full. :raz:


Edited by K8memphis (log)

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Umm, do you grind the pepper so it's real fine or leave it as larger tidbits in there?? And I like the idea of the small batch. That's a long bake for a little loaf.

My hands would shake, my brow would crease and moisten. I'd try real hard but I don't think I could keep from using TWO TEASPOONS OF CINNAMON   :wub:  OK, maybe just a very fluffy teaspoon full.  :raz:

I ground the pepper with the pepper mill. I'm pretty sure, like 90% sure, that the baking time is correct, although I started the timer at 35 minutes and then kept adding time on as it wasn't done yet. I think I took it out around the 55 minute mark, but obviously check the cake periodically as it may be done quicker.

(Psstt....I love Vietnamese cinnamon and my measures for cinnamon are always very generous. :wink: )

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