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ALTAF

Looking for Green tea cake

26 posts in this topic

I'm looking for the most beatiful and delicious green tea cake, like this one. which looks like chiffon.

I tried traslating it but it was'nt clear :angry: .

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Well, the ratio for that recipe is 50 grams of matcha to 800 grams of rice flour. I would try modifying your favorite chiffon cake recipe with approximately the same ratio of matcha-to-flour as a starting point. (Subtract the matcha from the total amount of flour called for in your recipe.)

Your personal taste will decide whether you want more or less matcha in the end product.

Also, the recipe uses a a green tea liqueur in the chantilly to up the matcha flavor quotient. This is probably a good idea.


Edited by sanrensho (log)

Baker of "impaired" cakes...

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they also used rice flour instead of regular flour, I have had a couple rice flour cakes here they are extremely delicate and tender...


<p><strong>Kristin Wagner</strong>, aka "torakris"

Manager, Membership

<a class="bbc_email" href="mailto:kwagner@egstaff.org" title="E-mail Link">kwagner@egstaff.org</a></p>

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Here are the step by step instructions

this amount makes two cakes

600g egg yolks

250g sugar

450g vegetable oil

50g matcha powder

50 g sugar

100g whole milk

400g boiling water

1000g egg whites

600g sugar

10g dried egg white

10g baking powder

800g rice flour


<p><strong>Kristin Wagner</strong>, aka "torakris"

Manager, Membership

<a class="bbc_email" href="mailto:kwagner@egstaff.org" title="E-mail Link">kwagner@egstaff.org</a></p>

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Kristin,

Thanks so much for taking the time to translate the recipe!

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Yes thank you :smile: ,I have been thinking of something like that lately , as I made some chocolates awhile ago I was wondering of a chai cake but the matcha ohhh yummy :biggrin:


Vanessa

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Kristin,

thanks alot for taking the time to translate the cake ingredients. But what about the frosting? What kide of frosting the chef used or is it just whipped cream?

Rodney,

thanks also for the link.

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Also, the recipe uses a a green tea liqueur in the chantilly to up the matcha flavor quotient. This is probably a good idea.

100 parts whipping cream (45%), 5.5 parts granulated sugar, 8 parts green tea liqueur (100:5.5:8).


Baker of "impaired" cakes...

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I am wondering if it is possible substitute the green tea liquor for something else ( I doubt I can find any here )


Vanessa

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^^^Perhaps a green tea whipped cream--using matcha whisked into a small amount of hot water, then cooled before whipping with the cream. However, you will lose the nice white contrast against the matcha cake.

Traditionally, I would suggest an an (sweetened red bean paste) whipped cream, but a lot of North Americans might not like it. Most other flavorings I can think of would overwhelm the delicate matcha taste.


Baker of "impaired" cakes...

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Traditionally, I would suggest an an (sweetened red bean paste) whipped cream, but a lot of North Americans might not like it. Most other flavorings I can think of would overwhelm the delicate matcha taste.

That sounds wonderful. I love anything using sweetened red bean paste.

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That sounds wonderful.  I love anything using sweetened red bean paste.

Rodney, if you like red bean paste then you might try locating some amanatto (Japanese candied beans--commonly available from Japanese grocers), and adding a moderate amount to the green tea sponge/chiffon batter. The small amanatto made from azuki beans would be ideal.

I find that the amanatto adds some textural interest to the green tea cake. (The version I made was a green tea sponge based on an RLB recipe, not the CakeChef one.)

Amanatto image


Edited by sanrensho (log)

Baker of "impaired" cakes...

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Rodney, if you like red bean paste then you might try locating some amanatto (Japanese candied beans--commonly available from Japanese grocers), and adding a moderate amount to the green tea sponge/chiffon batter. The small amanatto made from azuki beans would be ideal.

I find that the amanatto adds some textural interest to the green tea cake. (The version I made was a green tea sponge based on an RLB recipe, not the CakeChef one.)

Amanatto image

Thanks! I live not to far from Japantown and I know a great Japanese grocery store there, so I will look for these, how exciting. I just love trying new ingredients.

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Rodney CK that cake does look moist and delicious!

I have a recipe for Green Tea Marbled Pound Cake that I love! I can't remember where I found it, but if anyone is interested...

Yeild 1 standard loaf pan

375 degrees F

1 1/2 c. AP Flour

3/4 tsp. Baking Powder

dash of Salt

3 Eggs

1c. Sugar

1/2c. full-fat Yogurt (don't skimp on the fat!)

1tsp Vanilla Extract

1/2c. Melted Butter

1 to 2 Tblsp. Matcha Powder

2tsp. Water (hot)

Sift dry flour, baking powder, and salt together. Beat the eggs and sugar until creamy, then add sifted dry ingredients to combine. Next add yogurt and vanilla extract to combine. Combine the matcha and water to make a paste. Add paste to half of the batter mixture. Pour remaining "white" batter into loaf pan first, then gently marble in the matcha batter.

*I used beautiful organic matcha powder and it makes a difference. Careful when combining the matcha paste to the batter as it may produce clumps and require straining the batter.

The end result is a delicate green and white pound cake that smells of heavenly green tea. :wub:

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Thanks Summersun! Your recipe sounds equally as delicious and I bet pretty. I will definitely try it.

Keep spreading the green tea love people... :laugh:

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okay, i should know better, but... could you help me out on directions?????

i got the meringue and folding in the dry part but what about the first half?


nkaplan@delposto.com

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okay, i should know better, but... could you help me out on directions?????

i got the meringue and folding in the dry part but what about the first half?

i think it is like a standard egg foam cake...just whisk the yolks with the sugar until it increases in volume, then add the green tea powder dissolved in the boiling water (i'll assume here that you then add the oil, second measure of sugar and milk)...

then make the meringue with the third measure of sugar and dried egg whites and fold in at the end

but, that could be ass-u-ming too much :huh:

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TO me looks like , eggs batter with sugar then oil the half of the green tea mixture ,rice flour the rest of the green tea, last the meringue .


Vanessa

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okay, i should know better, but... could you help me out on directions?????

i got the meringue and folding in the dry part but what about the first half?

Which recipe?

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For the Japanese recipe:

1. Mix the egg yolks with the 250g of sugar

2~4. Slowly add the oil, occasionally scraping down the sides and beat until it is the consistency of thick cream

5. Mix the matcha, 50g of sugar, milk and boiling water together and add half of it to the mixture

6. Beating on low speed add the rice flour and baking powder

7. Once it has all been incorporated add the rest of the matcha mixture

8. Mix it until it looks like #8, sorry I can't remember what we say in English for this... :hmmm:

9. Mix the egg white, 600g of sugar and dried egg whites to stiff peaks

10. mix in 1/3 of the egg whites

11. Fold in the remaining 2/3 egg whites

12. fold until it looks like #12

13. Pour into two cake pans

14. Bake on the lower shelf at 180 C (350 F) for about an hour

The numbers follow the pictures on this page


<p><strong>Kristin Wagner</strong>, aka "torakris"

Manager, Membership

<a class="bbc_email" href="mailto:kwagner@egstaff.org" title="E-mail Link">kwagner@egstaff.org</a></p>

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Ok I think I underestimated the diffuculty of getting hold of maccha tea :huh: .

I went to my vitamine cottage today to get other stuff and the rice flour , but no maccha ( or matcha? ),I mean I am in colorado not in new york :sad: ,maybe tryin at the local japanese restaurant ?Maybe they will be able to seel me some , I was all set to make this cake this coming weekend and I hate when I get slowed down , anyway if I have no luck at the restaurant I will try online maybe I can get the liquor too then.

I cant wait to taste this beauty ( well it wont be like that made from me :laugh: )


Vanessa

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