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FabulousFoodBabe

eG Foodblog: FabulousFoodBabe - Of Queens and Former Presidents

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Nice blog FFB

Once you said:

I once broke up with a guy because I saw him eating a banana in a way that just made me cringe.  Like a monkey.  The memory still sets my teeth on edge.  I mean, what teenaged guy would pack a banana in his lunch?  And then sit there in the cafeteria, next to me, yakking away, peeling it like some sort of primate between bites?  I just couldn't look at him any more without thinking of him in a diaper, striped shirt and beret, scratching his pit with one hand and eating the banana in another.  I just ditched him right then and there.  And no, I never told him why. 

Please, please tell me, someone out there on eG., have you ever done this? If I am a lunatic, am I alone?  Many thanks,

Fabby

(I was reading Ya-Roo's story and laughing my butt off, and then recalled the banana incident to my husband and sons.  Mr. FFB told me that when he intends to leave me for a stripper, he will go on an all-banana diet, to make it easier on us all.)

I wish you had shown us how you eat one.

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Your Exalted Fabness:

The tours and plans and markets and banter have been delightful, and this glimpse of your busy, interesting life has been a very bright part of my week.

Thank you for making us a part of your week's activities and for sharing your fun fellows and their histories. Jean Luc standing guard, your beautiful, welcoming home, the easy comradeship of your whole family, and all that whirlwind which is you---we have been fortunate, indeed.

You've run your Choos off for us, and it's been MOST enjoyable. Go have an espresso in that Queen cup and rest on your laurels.

And start a kit reno blog NOW.

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Oh, dear. I completely forgot about this! :laugh: How'd you find it???

As for how I eat bananas: I have someone peel them for me, out of my sight. They are then cut thin on the diagonal and fed to me by hand by several scantily-clad Hugh Laurie look-alikes.

Nice blog FFB

Once you said:

I once broke up with a guy because I saw him eating a banana in a way that just made me cringe.  Like a monkey.  The memory still sets my teeth on edge.  I mean, what teenaged guy would pack a banana in his lunch?  And then sit there in the cafeteria, next to me, yakking away, peeling it like some sort of primate between bites?  I just couldn't look at him any more without thinking of him in a diaper, striped shirt and beret, scratching his pit with one hand and eating the banana in another.  I just ditched him right then and there.  And no, I never told him why. 

Please, please tell me, someone out there on eG., have you ever done this? If I am a lunatic, am I alone?  Many thanks,

Fabby

(I was reading Ya-Roo's story and laughing my butt off, and then recalled the banana incident to my husband and sons.  Mr. FFB told me that when he intends to leave me for a stripper, he will go on an all-banana diet, to make it easier on us all.)

I wish you had shown us how you eat one.

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Have you seen Hugh Laurie in his earlier roles on British television (e.g., in Jeeves & Wooster or Blackadder)? I do love the guy, but his incarnation as a hottie is a most recent one. Not too sure he could have peeled the banana until now. (Nevertheless, he can peel my bananas any time, but only if he speaks with his English accent).

Now, this blog has gone by far too quickly, as all good things do. Keep writing, so we can hear more about your wonderful kitchen-to-be! And I'm looking forward to reading that book of yours.


Edited by H. du Bois (log)

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Great blog FFB! Lots of fun to read and lots of fun to be a part of it! Thanks!

Yeah, what she said! Thank you for a great read!

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Here I am, bringing up the rear - sorry I was away from the blog until nearly the end.

What is the "pass through with pull *** door"?  Am I seeing aright that it's in the middle of a counter space in the middle of the left-hand side of the room?  I'm not getting that.

It's one of my favorite parts of the kitchen! When you walk into the kitchen from the dining room, to the left will be a small "pass" with a staging area, warming drawer/coffee center, and a speed oven. The pull-down door will open to a cleanup area on the other side of the 'wall.' I think of it as a grocery aisle, with the big refrigerator being an 'end cap' display ... pass on one side; dishwasher/cleanup on the other.

It's hard to describe without having something to look at, but this is the way I think of it. The refrigerator will open to the island, and the wet bar/beverage area will be between the kitchen and sitting room.

Am I making sense? My initial hope was to have the big sinks, dishwasher, storage, etc., in a separate room. I didn't want to change the footprint of the house, and to build it into this plan would make it very closed-off and boxy, which is what we're trying to get away from.

That makes perfect sense, and now I'm REALLY envious! If I ever get to design a kitchen (or remodel ours) I'll think about how we might adopt that approach. Your kitchen is going to be fabulous.

Darn. I meant to quote parts of the boys' diet business, but I'll just have to wing it. The Noodle-O's story was hilarious, as was the bit about your caving after your son didn't eat for 3 days. Good on ya for leading them rather than pushing, both in tastes and quantities of eating. Those friends of mine who weren't forced to eat everything put in front of them have been more successful than most at remaining slim after they passed their 30's.

I am so happy to have found eGullet!  I've met a few of you in person, and will meet  more in coming weeks/months, I hope.  As one of my friends who I met on eG said, "blogging is like having a party; you really hope people show up and have fun."  Thank you for the warm reception.  I've had fun, and I hope you-all have, too. 

Yes indeedy, this has been fun. Thanks so much for letting us peek into your life for a bit. One of the things I love about the blogs is that they're like mini-travelogues. We get to see parts of the world and ways of life that we might not otherwise see. You've done a dandy job showing us yours. Thank you! :wub:

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