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Savories: What are you making & baking?


glennbech
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Here's something I made for Easter. The dough had a wonderful texture, and the resulting bread was rich and sweet with a slight hint of lemon. Pulling the ropes off bit by bit was entertaining, too.

Golden Beehive Bread from Bernard Clayton's Complete Book of Breads.

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Kathy

Cooking is like love. It should be entered into with abandon or not at all. - Harriet Van Horne

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ooooh tejon, that's just beautiful! was it like a challah or brioche type enriched dough? it looks great and you must have proofed it perfectly as it kept its shape wonderfully. is the braid hollow? how did you form it?

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It's a very rich dough - 5 eggs and 1/2 cup sugar to 5 1/2 cups of flour. Shaping was pretty simple, just separate the dough into 20 pieces, roll to long ropes, then twist together. The twists wrapped around the bottom of a Pyrex bowl before a final rising and baking. The recipe called for removing the bread from the bowl and crumpling up aluminum foil as a base, but once it was cool it held shape pretty well without help.

Kathy

Cooking is like love. It should be entered into with abandon or not at all. - Harriet Van Horne

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This was my second attempt at making bagels. The first was many years ago and such an unmitigated disaster I haven't bothered since. However, Anne's lovely bagels ignited my interest and I don't think they came out too badly. The recipe was a bit of a rehash from Bo Friberg's Professional Pastry chef, and the poaching was in a mixture of honey and water.

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www.diariesofadomesticatedgoddess.blogspot.com

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Those are gorgeous! Could you direct me to the recipe? I planned to make the bagels from Bread Baker's Apprentice this weekend, but maybe I'll switch.

On another note, I'm having trouble finding high-gluten flour. BBA offers bread flour as a substitute but I wonder how well that will work. I'd hate to go through all the trouble and come out with crappy bagels. Has anyone tried this substitution?

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They come out fine with bread flour. I've also used KA Sir Lancelot High Gluten and they do come out chewier but I wouldn't hesitate to use bread flour.

The problem that I'm having though, is getting seeds and onions to stick, any advice?

Those are gorgeous! Could you direct me to the recipe? I planned to make the bagels from Bread Baker's Apprentice this weekend, but maybe I'll switch.

On another note, I'm having trouble finding high-gluten flour. BBA offers bread flour as a substitute but I wonder how well that will work. I'd hate to go through all the trouble and come out with crappy bagels. Has anyone tried this substitution?

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Nice Bill! Yummy!

1) What shaping technique do you use for your bagels? Do you start with a ball and pinch a hole, or start with a string that you connect?

2) What's the glaze?

Edited by glennbech (log)
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glennbech,

Thank you.

1) I roll the dough out into a 1/2"-thick sheet and use a metal donut cutter to punch out individual donuts. The methods you mention work well for bagels, but I prefer the cutter for donuts.

2) While they were still warm, I brushed them with a mixture of glazing sugar, water, and a few drop of fiori di sicilia .

Bill/SFNM

Edited by Bill/SFNM (log)
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Well this is my first post on the Pastry and Baking forum since I am not a baker. After reading a lot about the no knead bread technique and finding a video that showed the basics, I decided to give this a shot. I used Harvest King flour and just followed the recipe but dug deep in the bag for my 3 cups of flour. My water had to be adjusted since 1.5 cups yielded a very dry dough. I just kept adding until I had a very wet dough. I felt certain that it was too wet and after reading some of the failures on the no knead thread was bracing for the worst. Since the consensus was that this bread was lacking in taste I added a couple of tbs of dried rosemary and I was pairing it with a roast chicken so it sounded right. I let it sit for 16 hrs then flopped it out and did the fold but but it back into a stainless bowl covered with a towel for the second rise. In the oven at 500 F for 30 min and then 18 min uncovered at 450. When I lifted the lid for the second part of the bake I was rewarded with a well rounded loaf that was nicely golden in color. Taste wise it was very good. Better than any bread from any of our local bakeries and stellar for a non baker like me.

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I will definitely do this again but maybe add olives and roasted garlic to the mix. So simple, I am amazed at the results.

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OK, so here's my attempt at brioche, after not having made it in about 3 years. I used Neil's recipe here - but did it in the mixer. It made 8 little loaves....and made my house smell fantastic!

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Crumb comments please.

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Don't waste your time or time will waste you - Muse

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I can smell them from here :-)

I am sorry that I don't feel qualified to comment on the brioche crumb, other than to say that it looks fantastic :-)

Why thank you! I think they came out pretty nice too, but I'd like the opinion of someone who "knows" - I'm sure I could improve. I'm still working on my shaping technique, and I think I would like to have a smoother finish on top instead of the sort of cracked skin look they have now. :unsure:

Don't waste your time or time will waste you - Muse

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I got onto a bread roll.... haha, no pun intended...

Here is my pumpernickel bread that I made on Saturday. Folks, if you have never made one, please do yourself a favour and make one. It is soooo good when it's still warm slathered with some butter and sprinkled with sea salt. Yum.

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I also made these little eggbread buns. They came out soft and lovely. I deffinately won't be waiting too long until I made bread again.

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And I made these single knot buns with the same dough.

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The recipe for the eggbread is from Wayne Gisslen's Professional baking.

Don't waste your time or time will waste you - Muse

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  • 2 weeks later...

I am ashame to say that I havent bake bread in a while ( I feel very bad about it :raz: ) But I have baked different things .Last weekend I made some danish , this coming weekend i will get my hands into some more bread making .I wanted to make Bagels ina long time and I am kinda of intimidated by them.Any good recipe around?I have the baking illustrated book , I was thinking to get their recipe.

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Vanessa

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Is everybody kneading their egg bread/brioche/challah?

I have a no-knead recipe for egg bread that my family has been enjoying for the last couple of weeks, but I'm not sure it's worth posting the recipe or adding to RecipeGullet. I'm not a bread baker by any means, so "no-knead" recipes are the difference between baking bread or not at all.

Baker of "impaired" cakes...
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I finally baked a successful sourdough after many bricks. I used this recipe for San Francisco Sourdough except for baking at 500F with steam as described in BBA and lowering to 450F after 10 min. Huge oven spring, fantastic tangy taste, crisp crust. It's the first time I got the shape of a batard close to being correct.

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well it sure looks delicious! where may i find the recipe?

Well this is my first post on the Pastry and Baking forum since I am not a baker.  After reading a lot about the no knead bread technique and finding a video that showed the basics, I decided to give this a shot.  I used Harvest King flour and just followed the recipe but dug deep in the bag for my 3 cups of flour.  My water had to be adjusted since 1.5 cups yielded a very dry dough.  I just kept adding until I had a very wet dough.  I felt certain that it was too wet and after reading some of the failures on the no knead thread was bracing for the worst.  Since the consensus was that this bread was lacking in taste I added a couple of tbs of dried rosemary and I was pairing it with a roast chicken so it sounded right.  I let it sit for 16 hrs then flopped it out and did the fold but but it back into a stainless bowl covered with a towel for the second rise.  In the oven at 500 F for 30 min and then 18 min uncovered at 450.  When I lifted the lid for the second part of the bake I was rewarded with a well rounded loaf that was nicely golden in color.  Taste wise it was very good.  Better than any bread from any of our local bakeries and stellar for a non baker like me. 

gallery_6878_3484_3253.jpg

gallery_6878_3484_124472.jpg

I will definitely do this again but maybe add olives and roasted garlic to the mix.  So simple, I am amazed at the results.

Pastry PRincess

a day without love, laughter or dessert is a day wasted.

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Is everybody kneading their egg bread/brioche/challah?

I have a no-knead recipe for egg bread that my family has been enjoying for the last couple of weeks, but I'm not sure it's worth posting the recipe or adding to RecipeGullet. I'm not a bread baker by any means, so "no-knead" recipes are the difference between baking bread or not at all.

I want to see it! I've been having a harder and harder time kneading bread (carpal tunnel, tennis elbow), and I'm not getting good results from food processor bread. Brioche has been off my list for a long time because of all the kneading, so I'd love to see your recipe!

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Question for sourdough bakers....

I have three different starters going right now, a standard sourdough, a potato, and a rye.

I go through tons of "feeding flour". Do you need to use good flour (the same you would bake with) to feed your starter? I keep passing a mammoth, industrial sized bag of flour every time I shop at Costco and although I want to stick with KA for baking, I am very tempted to buy the large bag at Costco for feeding and maintaining my starters.

Is the flour you use to feed your starter as important as they flour you use to bake with?

Just curious how other bread bakers weigh in on this....

Edited by takomabaker (log)
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I read opinions in different books covering all of the possibilities, all-purpose vs. bread flour, organic vs. non-organic, all white vs. rye or whole wheat, spring water vs. tap water, etc.

I used KA Organic All-Purpose because I had some on hand and it worked out fine for me but I don't know if it's necessary. I have to admit that I cheated a little and seeded the first feeding with a few grains of commercial active dry yeast. I figured that I'm after good taste not necessarily purity or authenticity.

The flour in the Costco stores in my area are all bleached flour which I want to avoid, but is a good dollar value.

Question for sourdough bakers....

I have three different starters going right now, a standard sourdough, a potato, and a rye.

I go through tons of "feeding flour". Do you need to use good flour (the same you would bake with) to feed your starter? I keep passing a mammoth, industrial sized bag of flour every time I shop at Costco and although I want to stick with KA for baking, I am very tempted to buy the large bag at Costco for feeding and maintaining my starters.

Is the flour you use to feed your starter as important as they flour you use to bake with?

Just curious how other bread bakers weigh in on this....

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I want to see it!  I've been having a harder and harder time kneading bread (carpal tunnel, tennis elbow), and I'm not getting good results from food processor bread.  Brioche has been off my list for a long time because of all the kneading, so I'd love to see your recipe!

Hi Rona. Sorry about the glacial response. The recipe is actually a Japanese one and contains eggs and milk, but no butter (so technically not a brioche).

I'll send you a PM of the original recipe, rather than my modified one, since the original ingredients/weights will probably work better for you.

Baker of "impaired" cakes...
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