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Savories: What are you making & baking?


glennbech
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Made an olive bread based on a formula in Cooks.  I made some changes, and adapted it to a no-knead method.

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If you're interested in the recipe, more pictures, or the no-knead method, you can find more stuff HERE

Unconundrum YUM!!! Olive bread is my son's favourite. I like to add roasted garlic as well.

CRUZMISL Love your slash marks. Beautiful loaf.

I baked 7 loaves of sourdough bread today. Four Ciabatta and three French.

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Baguettes. I was particularly pleased with the crumb texture.

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If I thought I could produce something like that I would consider selling my soul.

What recipe and technique are you using, do you have a link to it?

If the recipe doesn't work do you have a "cancellation insurance" on Souls? :biggrin:

"Don't be shy, just give it a try!"

Nungkysman: Food for the Body and the Soul.

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After a long period of not baking I'm back in business with a new sourdough starter.

This is my first loaf using it. (Sorry for the horrible photo quality). You might notice a huge crack in the middle of the loaf. My theory so far is unsufficiant final proofing (3 hours) and that I didn't cut the loaf enough prior to baking.

But... The point is that I'm finally sourdough baking again. It feels good to have a well working sourdough starter in the fridge :-) I'll make sure to post better quality bread, and better quality photos later ! :-)

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This is the multigrain from Bread Baker's Apprentice. I used the bread machine for kneading and first rise. I'm glad I did as the dough seemed pretty sticky and I would have added a lot of flour if I did it by hand. The second rise after shaping in a 9X5 was extremely fast. Reinhart says it should be about 90 minutes but I think the bread machine warmed the dough up so much during first rise that everything was moving a lot quicker. I punched it down in the pan a couple of times to give it more time. A piece of toast was delicious. The only thing stopping me from making this constantly is the need for a little cooked brown rice. Whenever I make brown rice (pretty often), a couple of these loaves will be on the menu the next day.

rich

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Edited by rcaffelle (log)
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These breads look SO yummy.

Definitely my inspiration for today.

From yesterday's bread, 20 loaves for a wedding (plus 8 loaves left over for us and the dogs)....

The lighting leaves a lot to be desired in these....

The rosemary sourdough:

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and the garlic sourdough:

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fanny loves foodbeam

pâtisserie & sweetness

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I am finally back in business with a good starter, after a long SD baking break.

This is a very basic 3 Ingredient loaf, 70% water. Bulk fermented for about 18 hours, the first 10 in the fridge, and the last 8 on the counter. It got (no sureprise) real sour :-) It was experimental, but the only workflow I could manage in the middle of th week .-) I can recommend it if you like the real sour taste :-)

It stuck (!!!) while I removed it from my improvised proofing basket. This caused it to flatten out a lot. In only one more week or so, I'll get my bannetons from brotformen.de..... :-) I am Really looking forward to that .-)

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Improvised proofing basket. Floured cloth in a plastic bowl. I would not recommend it :)

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Edited by glennbech (log)
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Glenn, So good to see you back again. I was wondering what happened to you and I'm really glad to see that you haven't stopped baking. Your bread looks great! I have found when I take a break, it takes me a while to get back into the

swing of things again and refresh my mind with what I had previously learned. Anyway, I'm so happy to see you back...Welcome! :biggrin:

Just a simple southern lady lost out west...

"Leave Mother in the fridge in a covered jar between bakes. No need to feed her." Jackal10

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I baked a couple of breads this morning - an olive bread and a plain bread - both using only sourdough starter (which I had started myself in mid-December) and about 10% whole wheat flour. They are basically a riff on jackal's sourdough methodology - but baked in an enameled cast-iron dutch oven ala Bittmann.

Here are the photos:

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This is a shot of the breads after an overnight retardation in the fridge...the olive bread is on the right.

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Here are the whole loaves after baking...the olive bread is on the left, and I probably slashed the bread on the right a little too deeply (after I cut my thumb on the lame, I was pissed off), creating a bit of a hat effect!

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The cut loaves close-up - nicer crumb structure in the plain bread - the one on top.

Both of these breads are crusty and tasty - and for a first attempt at a bread with additions like olives, I'm pretty happy with the result...especially as I'm getting a really nice rise just using sourdough!

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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Both of these breads are crusty and tasty - and for a first attempt at a bread with additions like olives, I'm pretty happy with the result...especially as I'm getting a really nice rise just using sourdough!

Nice work! :-) I noticed your proofing baskets, what kind of cloth are you using, and do you have problems with sticking? How much water in yout recipe.

Nice crust colour and slicing patterns .-)

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Nice work! :-) I noticed your proofing baskets, what kind of cloth are you using, and do you have problems with sticking? How much water in yout recipe.

Nice crust colour and slicing patterns .-)

Thanks! I use heavy cotton napkins to line the proofing baskets - with a sprinkling of rice flour - no problem with sticking at all, and as jackal pointed out in his egullet tutorial on sourdough, the overnight rest in the fridge also helps firm the dough up, and makes it easier to handle when transferring to the peel.

The dough I've been making lately has around 70% hydration - including about 1/2 lb. of starter.

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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  • 2 weeks later...

In honour of St. Patrick's day, I made Soda bread for the first time. It's a 'Fruit Soda bread" from a vegetarian cookbook my mother has recently started using.

Dinner is in a few minutes, so we'll soon see how it tastes.

This, is the unbaked dough, which battled me all the way in my attempt to take a semi-complimentary photograph of it. :hmmm:

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Then, the result. The recipe called for 30-35 minutes at 200C. Our oven is obviously on something, since it was in a mere 15.

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Please take a quick look at my stuff.

Flickr foods

Blood Sugar

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Yesterday I baked a couple of different breads and rolls...one bread using both yeast and starter (called Levain de Pate per the King Arthur book), one bread made just with sourdough starter, and rolls from the Il Fornaio baking book (yeast risen and focaccia like).

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The bread on the left was made with 5% w.w. flour, 95% bread flour and baked on a stone, while the bread on the right was 50% a/p flour, 50% bread flour and a cup-full of starter - baked in an enameled dutch oven - which gives an amazing difference in the look of the crust, and a higher rise due to it's enclosed baking chamber.

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These Il Forniao rolls are simple and delicious. Some are topped with sliced shallots and the others with chopped rosemary - in addition to a sprinkling of Maldon Sea Salt.

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Shallot and sea-salt focaccette close up! I found these much easier to place on parchment for their third rise (after scaling and shaping), which is then easily slipped onto the stone. The first batch I let sit on my floured worktop and then tried to transfer to a peel one at a time, resulting in a number of misshapen rolls. I'll be using the parchment trick from now on.

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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I love pizza. Pizza for dessert would be perfect. Do you use a regular dough or a sweet one? What kind of cheese is Robiola, and do I see a herb on top of the pizza?

I also find it amusing when your eyeas see something, your mind expects something, but your taste buds report something completely different :-)

Edited by glennbech (log)
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I love pizza. Pizza for dessert would be perfect. Do you use a regular dough or a sweet one? What kind of cheese is Robiola, and do I see a herb on top of the pizza?

I also find it amusing when your eyeas see something, your mind expects something, but your taste buds report something completely different :-)

glennbech,

I use regular my regular dough. I always make extra dough balls when I bake pizzas; they are great for dessert pies, strombolis, pita breads, naans, rolls, etc. Unused dough balls keep for several days in the refrigerator.

The dough is savory with a subtle tang from the natural starter and it makes a great foil for sweets. Pizzabrasil who frequents these parts gave me the original inspiration for a dessert pizza with strawberries and chocolate. The resulting pie was unexpectedly awesome.

The Robiola Bosina I used is a mildly ripened cheese of cow and sheep milk. It stood up well to the 1000F of the oven. The herb you see is a sprig of fresh thyme for garnish. The fig sauce contains some minced thyme, lemon zest, and Armagnac.

Bill/SFNM

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  • 4 weeks later...

Guess what arrived in the mail today? Cane bannetons from brotformen.de! :-) Had to try'em out immediately with a direct yeasted dough (20% wholemeal spelt, 80% AP flour, and lots of flax, sunflower and sessame seeds).

It sure makes an interesting pattern! I can't wait to try'em out on my sourdough recipes

:biggrin:

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Edited by glennbech (log)
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Brown butter and vanilla bean brioche!

Lisa Boy does that ever sound good.

Glen I was gifted with a round brotform recently. Now I need to buy a couple more like yours. Great looking loaves.

I found a new source for stoneground rye to feed my sourdough mother. Mixed up a biga on Wednesday night and baked some sourdough rye last night.

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Ann

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boy.. these breads are so pretty! I haven't been able to do any sour dough breads yet (from scratch) but I bake almost everyday and well, this is one way I earn money. I bake for this small private boys school.

It's good. :) I've been baking regularly for the past 3 years or so. I love it.

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