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Savories: What are you making & baking?


glennbech
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That Def Lepard thing is too funny - I hope Dan sees that! How did you get that prerry pattern on the top of your loaf, Kim? Actually, on closer examination, the shaping of the sides has a pattern too. Can you tell us how you formed your loaf?

Beautiful garlic bread, McDuff.

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That Def Lepard thing is too funny - I hope Dan sees that!  How did you get that prerry pattern on the top of your loaf, Kim?  Actually, on closer examination, the shaping of the sides has a pattern too.  Can you tell us how you formed your loaf?

Beautiful garlic bread, McDuff.

Abra - this loaf is one that you roll up before putting in the pan to rise and the lines along the side are from incomplete pinching, I think :wink: - I always get them, more or less, when I make this loaf. The top is just criss cross slashing that I do with my paring knife. I just hone it right before slashing and spray the knife w/ cooking spray.

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I haven't been baking much bread this year, but am starting to get back into it. This is Pugliese from BBA:

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The crumb was a little disappointing, because I baked too early (it was 11:30 p.m. and I was too tired to wait any more). Camera batteries died or I would have a crumb shot too.

This is what I call my "money" bagel shot from my eG blog early this year:

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I ended up baking bagels and cinnamon rolls for a small coffee shop near my house for several months this year, and that's why my bread baking at home suffered. Unfortunately, the coffee shop went belly up (bad location more than anything), so it's back to home baking for me.

Edited by Darcie B (log)
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Thanks Michelle and Kim.

Wow, so many beautiful loaves.

I'm pretty boring when it comes to bread. Although I bake almost all the bread that we eat, I stick to French and Italian. Although looking at all the sour dough loaves I think I might have to try my hand at that.

Michelle, the recipe I use for bagels isn't from the BBA. It is actually out of an appetizer cookbook. I've been making bagels using this same recipe for over 20 years.

I made Onion and cheese bagels recently using the same basic recipe. They were a big hit with my son. I froze most of them and the next time we went to Victoria I took him a care package.

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I use the same dough to make pizza too.

Ann

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I can't remember whan I last had a good bagel, but this page is definitely engendering bagel lust!

Kim, if you take a picture of that criss-cross slash the next time you make sandwich bread, I promise to learn how to spell "pretty." It's a lovely look.

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Michelle, the recipe I use for bagels isn't from the BBA.  It is actually out of an appetizer cookbook.  I've been making bagels using this same recipe for over 20 years. 

Ann, interesting.. maybe that book is the source of Peter Reinhart's bagels? I believe it was you who posted a bagel recipe some time, which I copied down, and when I decided to try the bagels from BBA, I realized it was the exact same recipe.

Michelle Pham

I like pie.

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  • 1 month later...

This was awhile back, but still one of my favorite series of photos. I didn't think to take photos of the dough. Silly me!

It's Cinnamon Walnut bread, made with only a small amount of sugar and some Splenda. Not very sweet.

I made it to go with chicken salad (with the bread toasted).

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Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Very nice.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Baking session 22 Sep for Rosh Hashona (hence round loaves) and apple pressing day

Breads baking in the wood fired brick oven

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Chocolate Challah (thanks Comfort Me!)

Must use yeast; the chocolate kills sourdough for some reason

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New Year Challah

Round, honey, and fruit (bread with fruit, not fruit bread)

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More breads: Wholemeal miche, spelt, mixed seed, onion and sultana...

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These are pics I took for my recently-pretty-much-finished-web site for my finally-completed (mostly) artisan bread bakery.

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The Village Bakery

Lovely bread, great website! Is that a picture of your oven?

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Lovely bread, great website!  Is that a picture of your oven?

Kerry, thanks. Yes, that's my oven (designed by Alan Scott), and all the pics on the site are mine, save two or three thumbnails of produce (garlic, onions, and tomatoes, I think) at the bottom of one of the pages which were stock photos from the hosting site.

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Today's all sourdough baguettes:

gallery_7620_135_1151.jpg

gallery_7620_135_19648.jpg

The flour was supermarket plain organic flour (9.8% protein) (pastry flour)

Sponge:

200g flour

100g water

10 g mother

Ferment for 12 hours

Pre-mix:

400g flour

1g Vit C

12 g Salt

320g water

Rough mix and leave for an hour

Dough

Mix intensively the sponge and the premix. I use a food processor, but I guess you can use a mixer, until the dough picks up and then releases - almost overmixed.

Probably too tough to mix my hand.

Bench rest (bulk ferment in the mixer) 1 hour

Shape and put in a couche. Retard (refrigerator) overnight, covered. Bake hot, plenty of bottom heat and steam in the first minute.

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From yesterday's bread, 20 loaves for a wedding (plus 8 loaves left over for us and the dogs)....

The lighting leaves a lot to be desired in these....

The rosemary sourdough:

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and the garlic sourdough:

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wow, devlin, what a beautiful community you live in. it's like something from a movie (well, one of those breadhead films playing in my head). The loaves and cakes looks very good, with a handsome oven too. Some people have the best life...

regards

Dan

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Today's all sourdough baguettes:

gallery_7620_135_1151.jpg

gallery_7620_135_19648.jpg

The flour was supermarket plain organic flour (9.8% protein) (pastry flour)

Sponge:

200g flour

100g water

10 g mother

Ferment for 12 hours

Pre-mix:

400g flour

1g Vit C

12 g Salt

320g water

Rough mix and leave for an hour

Dough

Mix intensively the sponge and the premix. I use a food processor, but I guess you can use a mixer, until the dough picks up and then releases - almost overmixed.

Probably too tough to mix my hand.

Bench rest (bulk ferment in the mixer) 1 hour

Shape and put in a couche. Retard (refrigerator) overnight, covered.  Bake hot, plenty of bottom heat and steam in the first minute.

Jackal those baguettes looks nice and crispy on the outside with not so much crumb ( the way I love my bread ),thank you for posting the formula.

I have one question for you , since you are the expert on shipping you starter .I am leaving for Italy in few days and I was wondering if I could bring some of the starter with me , put it inside a double ziplock bag inside something else and in my check in baggage.DO you think it is possible or the starter would suffer to much ?I can try to make a starter while I am there for my parents to keep I guess that might be the best option ( usually takes one week right?).

Vanessa

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Depends how liquid it is. If its runny I would put it in something stiffer. I have a vision of your bag being squashed under a pile of other bags. Also don't seal it, as the pressure in the hold will change.

When I ship starter I make it as stiff as I possibly can - think making pasta. That slows the fermenation right down. It seems to post in a plastic bag in a padded post bag OK. I leave the plastic bag unsealed just in case there is any gas production.

You might post some as a backup.

Edited by jackal10 (log)
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Depends how liquid it is.  If its runny I would put it in something stiffer. I have a vision of your bag being squashed under a pile of other bags. Also don't seal it, as the pressure in the hold will change.

When I ship starter I make it as stiff as I possibly can - think making pasta. That slows the fermenation right down. It seems to post in a plastic bag in a  padded post bag OK. I leave the plastic bag unsealed just in case there is any gas production.

You might post some as a backup.

Ahh I didnt think about the gas , ofcourse, and the stifness.My rye one is pretty stiff but I can stiffer it little more then use a container , like a little topperware maybe?It is safe to close it?

Thank you so much , I really fancy you oven , ahh maybe one day :rolleyes:

Vanessa

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wow, devlin, what a beautiful community you live in. it's like something from a movie (well, one of those breadhead films playing in my head). The loaves and cakes looks very good, with a handsome oven too. Some people have the best life...

regards

Dan

Dan, thanks. It's very beautiful around here. We're deep in horse country, Kentucky derby country, and it's one of my favorite places in the world. I love being able to drive to the mills to pick up flours, and the drives are a fabulous sort of respite from a day's worries and work. I'm so grateful too for being able to take advantage of Alan Scott's wisdom and advice. The oven's a lot of work, but every time I wonder whether it was a good idea (on those days when the wood's all wrong and the fire's not working as it might and I'm afraid I'll lose a whole batch of dough), everything sort of magically comes together, and the bread is as good as it should be, and customers are so generous,... and, well, it's all good.

I do have a good life, a lot to be thankful for. I'm still sort of taken aback it's all come together the way it has. I'll tell you what, though.... I don't think you could pay me to do another web site. Gad.

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My rye one is pretty stiff but I can stiffer it little more then use a container , like a little topperware maybe?It is safe to close it?

Years back when I was a regular on the newsgroup rec.food.sourdough we used to exchange starters by spreading a little on something like waxed lunchwrap, letting it dry, putting the flakes in a ziplock bag and then posting them (in my case they came across the world from the US to New Zealand.) This would then be mixed with flour and water and nurtured till they started to grow.

I had the Alaskan, the Russian and the SF one all bubbling along nicely. The Alaskan made particularly good bread, as I recall :smile:

I've located the archives. Go here and scroll down to section XV.

Edited by Pat Churchill (log)

Website: http://cookingdownunder.com

Blog: http://cookingdownunder.com/blog

Twitter: @patinoz

The floggings will continue until morale improves

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Today's all sourdough baguettes:

gallery_7620_135_1151.jpg

gallery_7620_135_19648.jpg

The flour was supermarket plain organic flour (9.8% protein) (pastry flour)

Sponge:

200g flour

100g water

10 g mother

Ferment for 12 hours

Pre-mix:

400g flour

1g Vit C

12 g Salt

320g water

Rough mix and leave for an hour

Dough

Mix intensively the sponge and the premix. I use a food processor, but I guess you can use a mixer, until the dough picks up and then releases - almost overmixed.

Probably too tough to mix my hand.

Bench rest (bulk ferment in the mixer) 1 hour

Shape and put in a couche. Retard (refrigerator) overnight, covered.  Bake hot, plenty of bottom heat and steam in the first minute.

Thanks for the formula and the pictures, sure looks good :rolleyes: I have a question for you...

I'm recently baking sourdough about every 3-4 weeks, and trying various yeasted breads at other times (trying to develope a few really really good recipes that work on my schedule). But, my question is, what feeding schedule should I use to get my mother up and ready to bake? I try to feed her at least once a week when she's not going to be used, so I need to know the proper schedule to ramp her up for optimum performance.

You're always so helpful, and thorough, I enjoy reading your posts, I've learned a lot from you. Thanks!

Just a simple southern lady lost out west...

"Leave Mother in the fridge in a covered jar between bakes. No need to feed her." Jackal10

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You are working too hard. Leave Mother in the fridge in a covered jar between bakes. No need to feed her. She will be quite all right, May separate into two layers, but just stir them together before use.

12- 24 hours before you want to bake take the preferment, either a poolish (liquid - 100% hydration - equal quantities of flour and water by weight) or a biga(stiff - 50% hydration, twice as much flour as water by weight) plus a spoonful (about 10% by weight of flour) of Mother. It doesn't take much to seed the fermentation. Put Mother back in the fridge. Let the preferment ferment for 12-24 hours at 90F/30C Temperature is important.

If Mother is looking a bit skinny and thin because you have used most of her make a double batch of preferment when you next bake and use half to replace Mother. If you do this every few months, when the starter is getting used up you prevent a build-up of acid and other fermentation by products that can inhibit growth.

If you are baking large volumes, then you might consider a two or even three stage build. First stage is as above. After 12 hours multiply by at least 3 or even 5 - the preferment so far plus five times its weight in flour and five time its weight in water. Ferment for 12 hours and you have 10Kg of preferment. Repeat and 12 hours later you have 100Kg of preferment, enough for 500lbs of bread and an industrial bakery.

If you are baking at that scale we should discuss handling systems, flourbrew or systems, and pumped levain....

Edited by jackal10 (log)
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