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Savories: What are you making & baking?


glennbech
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I am afraid of yeast  :unsure: ... and it well may be afraid of me, too!  :laugh:

:laugh: I know what you mean, in the beginning I was also afraid of yeast, specially when this one turned into a monster in my fridge and threatened to scape and spread horror and terror in town:

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:raz: Needless to say that the bread from that dough was far too inedible with the excess of yeast... I was still learning how to bake breads...

Then after reading many bread books, egullets threads and websites, I've finally learned how to deal with yeast, temperature, umidity and all that. As result, I managed to make nice ones like this Pain L'Ancienne, which is so simple to make and sooo tasty:

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then eventually I've tried to make my wild yeast starter. I failed many times. But persistence paid off:

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and from there I started to make sourdough breads. This one doesn't look very nice and big but it was incredible good in taste and texture:

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So, do not be afraid of yeast, they are perfectly tamable beasts. (didn't mean to rhyme... :raz: )

:smile:

Marcia

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All the breads look great, but I am especially impressed with the English muffinsby Bill44.  Would you  tell us what recipe you used or post it?  Thanks

Pastrymama, the recipe came from here in the special recipes section, there are 32 recipes in there.:-

Northwest Sourdough

I made a half batch and used half milk half water instead of just all water.

Kind regards

Bill

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I guess I'm gonna have to work on my photo posting skills. Last time I treid they all posted black. And I'm gonna have to work on getting that money shot before everyone tears into the bread! :biggrin: I actually did a bread baking marathon of sorts yesterday. Tried three new recipes. Next time I will time them out to where they don't all need to be in the oven at the same time. :wacko:

I did Bernard Clayton's minted yogurt bread which sounded fabulous but I think the lemon zest kind of overwhelms it and if I did it again, I would probably put just a little zest in it. I think he like his flavors really strong and in your face.

I also did his dill casserole bread which again had one ingredient, this time being the instant onion, that was a bit overwhelming. Next time I would probably dry my own shallots or just carmelize them before putting them in. I should probably say too that I'm simply not a fan of the dried onion flake taste but it was really strong.

The hit of the day was Suzanne Dunaway's pane rustica from her No Need To Knead book. Love this one! NO kneading. Very little work for such an awesome bread. I can see coming home from a long day a work and still crankin' this one out for sandwiches for lunch the next day. Great smell and flavor right out of the oven. I could see tossing a warm one in the center of the dinner table and letting everyone just tear off a hunk. It made a great cheese sandwich (which is sitting in front of me now) by just putting a slice of cheese into it and nuking it for one minute in the microwave at work. (Yes, I'm working today.) I'll have to try it with peanutbutter and see if it works. Might not have the right flavor for that. If it does, I think I found the perfect everyday bread for my household. I'll work on the photos. I promise.

Pamela Wilkinson

www.portlandfood.org

Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."

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I am in awe of the beautiful breads being shown in this thread!

These are not artisan loaves by any means just everyday bread. They come together fast in the food processor, and are consistently pleasant if not over the top.

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The darker bread is Anadama and the "baguette" is from Gourmet modified somewhat by me to be a slacker dough and to make just one small loaf which is plenty for the two of us.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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All the breads look great, but I am especially impressed with the English muffinsby Bill44.  Would you  tell us what recipe you used or post it?  Thanks

Pastrymama, the recipe came from here in the special recipes section, there are 32 recipes in there.:-

Northwest Sourdough

I made a half batch and used half milk half water instead of just all water.

Thanks for the link, I am going to try making the English muffins first, then maybe some of the other recipes.

check out my baking and pastry books at the Pastrymama1 shop on www.Half.ebay.com

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Thanks for the link,  I am going to try making the English muffins first, then maybe some of the other recipes.

As it says in the recipe, use plenty of flour when working with the dough, it's very soft.

Kind regards

Bill

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My attempt at a Vietnamese-style rice flour baguette for banh mi - turned out to be too crunchy

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Do cinnamon buns count?

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Cheese and home-cured pancetta bread

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A marzipan kringle thingie

gallery_16307_2558_12045.jpg

I'm almost looking forward to some cooler weather so I can take up baking again.

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Cheese and home-cured pancetta bread

gallery_16307_2558_53535.jpg

A marzipan kringle thingie

gallery_16307_2558_12045.jpg

I'm almost looking forward to some cooler weather so I can take up baking again.

Abra, your savory breads always look so yummy. What's the dough base for that one, just a simple yeasted white bread or something enriched? And the cheese? And can you say more about the marzipan kringle thingie? It looks yummy. What's the center?

Edited by devlin (log)
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I'm almost looking forward to some cooler weather so I can take up baking again.

I'm starting to worry about the fragile state of the US residents. I've seen this type of statement from quite a few people in the US.

Abra, you live 40deg 24min North, I live at 33deg 15min South and I bake all year round. We have a good Aussie climate, it was only 44C (111.2F) on new years day this year, just nice baking weather. :rolleyes::biggrin:

Kind regards

Bill

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I'm almost looking forward to some cooler weather so I can take up baking again.

I'm starting to worry about the fragile state of the US residents. I've seen this type of statement from quite a few people in the US.

Abra, you live 40deg 24min North, I live at 33deg 15min South and I bake all year round. We have a good Aussie climate, it was only 44C (111.2F) on new years day this year, just nice baking weather. :rolleyes::biggrin:

Heh, yeah, I'm with you -- it's never too hot to bake! I used to work in kitchens that reached 115F (measured on the line) in the summer, over deep fryers, grills, and hot tables -- a single oven on when the outside temp is 90-105F (here, where granted it is usually pretty dry) isn't noticeable to me.

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Over the weekend, I baked sandwich bread for a friend's 80th birthday party. Although some of it did get used to make sandwiches, most people were eating the sliced bread just as it was -- without even putting anything on it. The best compliment, to be sure!

Here is a picture of all the breads I made between Saturday 8 AM and Sunday 8 AM.

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From the back working clockwise you have ...

* Pain de Mie

* Portuguese Sweet Bread (from BBA)

* Sweet Potato Bread

* Honey Whole Wheat

Unfortunately, as these loaves were for a party, I wasn't able to get crumb shots before leaving for the event.

(edited to fix image link)

Edited by tino27 (log)

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As to the "kringle thingie" you were exactly right, Dan. I posted a bit about the technique here. The recipe I used was this one from Sunset Magazine, with the addition of cinnamon chips.

The pancetta and cheese bread is the Casatiello from BBA, done as minis in little pannetone papers. Unfortunately, I don't remember what cheese I used, only that it was something relatively strong.

As to the weather, it's not so much that it's too hot per se, although we don't have air conditioning here, so it can get pretty warm in the kitchen. I have a blackberry pie in the oven at this moment, so I can't claim that I don't bake in summer at all. It's more that in summer I feel like grilling, smoking meats, salads, fruit desserts, and all that. In winter I get much more into soups and baking breads. I know, I'm a wimp.

Tino, how did you get that beautiful shine on the boules? I've got to try Bill's beautiful English muffins. That's something I haven't done well with so far.

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Here's a link for the casatiello recipe for anyone who doesn't have a copy of the Bread Baker's Apprentice.

Pamela Wilkinson

www.portlandfood.org

Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."

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Tino, how did you get that beautiful shine on the boules?  I've got to try Bill's beautiful English muffins.  That's something I haven't done well with so far.

I used straight egg wash, not diluted with water. That gives it the glistening shine. However, it's the sugar in the dough that makes it that beautiful mahogany brown color. I do bake them at the same temperature as listed in BBA, however, mine are consistenly done after 40 minutes, not the 50-60 minutes originally called for.

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Instagram: Link

Twitter: Link

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gallery_10324_3542_41426.jpg

(I can't for the life of me figure out how to link to the image I just uploaded to ImageGullet, but I remade the Dan Lepard garlic bread, dropped the hydration to 71%, and got a beautiful loaf of bread. It's in the public folder. Is there a trick to this? I'm getting a truncated message in the dialog box and you can't copy and paste into that little box.)

thanks for the help, folks. I'm having one of those days where I can't even use a debit card right. And I'm about to go cut a hole in my kitchen floor to move a heating duct. At least the bread came out better. I tossed it into a 500 oven and turned it right down to 425.

Edited by McDuff (log)
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I can't for the life of me figure out how to link to  the image I just uploaded to ImageGullet, but I remade the Dan Lepard garlic bread, dropped the hydration to 71%, and got a beautiful loaf of bread. It's in the public folder. Is there a trick to this? I'm getting a truncated message in the dialog box and you can't copy and paste into that little box.

if you choose "view image", on the bottom right of the picture, there will be a message that says something like "click for actual url", a window pops up with the url and you can then copy and paste that url into your reply/post to a thread using the "img" button (just as if you were copying and pasting a web address using the "http://" button...

did that make any sense?

Edited by alanamoana (log)
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I am in awe of the photos in this thread! I am going to try to post a couple of pictures of my latest effort. It is a loaf of American sandwich loaf from Cooks Illustrated baking book. It is my first loaf of bread in a very long time!

The loaf:

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sliced:

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I really hope that I can post these photos. I haven't been able to before.

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Here are some BBA bagels. My dough wasn't stiff enough so they flattened a bit during boiling but were still tasty.

bagels.jpg

For really beautiful looking bagels, look through Ann_T's posts, I think she uses the BBA recipe too.

I was going to say the exact same thing re: Ann_T. She certainly belongs at this thread with her bagel and bread!

Grub - don't apologize for that bread. I'd eat it and that sandwich looks delicious.

I have to confess my ignorance. I was puzzled at first by the many references to Def Lepard - my misreading of Dan Lepard - I couldn't figure out what in the world some 70's hair band had to do with bread making :laugh: !

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