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glennbech

Savories: What are you making & baking?

213 posts in this topic

I'm finally settled into a new apartment, and are finally able to bake again! To test my new oven, I did a very basic 4 ingredient sourdough, 65% Hydration, "Hand made, Dan Lepard style", fridge retarded 24 hours / overnight for proofing (notice the blisters!). Baked on a hot stone for ~ 65 minutes.

I wanted to test out a new way to make a gringe. My local artisan bakery had a pattern that I wanted to replicate. It's a "checkerboard", 3 by 3 cuts. Not very easy to see maybe, I can post more pictures of it later.

Also note that It's slightly underproofed on purpose. (Baked it still a bit cold), I didn't want the gringe to be filled in completely as I wanted those square "tops" on top of the loaf ( the thing I was trying to replicate). The "tears" were unintentional, so I could have waited for another 30 minutes or so i guess.

At the same time, I just wanted to create a thread where myself and anyone who wants can post pictures of our little creations, for no particular reason .-) I know how proud you all are, so don't be shy! :-)

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Edited by glennbech (log)

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Is this what you were trying for?

gallery_43622_3524_10779.jpg


Kind regards

Bill

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what great loaves, guys! But what I will never understand is why a home baker can produce such great bread while so many commercial bakers won't (rather than "can't").

Dan

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Bill44; Excellent! :-) The Loaf I was "copycating" wasn't as regular as yours, but; wow that looks good ! .-)

Dan; Thanks! Here in Norway, we have a only one major comercial company that does "the real thing". They had a turnover of about 2 million pounds last year, so it's good business. I'm lucky to live very close to one of their 3 bakeries .-) Their loaves and pastries are amazing. I'll post some pictures later.

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glennbech---I've gotta say it looks like you've nailed it, irregular looking top or not. When you first started posting about your technique of experimenting I thought you might be a little out there, but you can make a loaf of bread. That loaf looks like more.

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Here are a couple of mine:

gallery_8006_298_1105728278.jpg

Panettone

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Walnut Bread


Edited by Swisskaese (log)

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LOL, great idea, Glenn! Always love to oogle at Breads! Here's mine. But, don't view it in Mozilla. Problem with the scrolling. And, my sourdough blog.

Great breads, everybody. Yum!


TPcal!

Food Pix (plus others)

Please take pictures of all the food you get to try (and if you can, the food at the next tables)............................Dejah

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Bread: (Yeah, it belongs in the "Regrettable" gallery -- it is there...)

gallery_28832_1787_13936.jpg

Sandwich made from an almost equally failed attempt:

gallery_28832_1138_9632.jpg

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Great thread! When I think about all the bread disasters I have had over the years, taking pictures never occurred to me but I will do it next time! Maybe I will laugh instead of cry :hmmm:


Edited by Velma (log)

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fantastic pix! Thanks

glenbach, how does your loaf compare to the ones made at the local artisan bakery?

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gallery_10108_3240_1978749.jpg

here's a ciabatta i made using the recipe from the il fornaio baking book but jeffrey hamelman's method.

this thread might prove (!) to push me to bake some more, which would be good as i enjoy it very much.

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This is a sourdough rye...

ryeloaf.jpg

cutrye.jpg

Cheers...

Don


Edited by donyeokl (log)

Cheers...

Don

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This is one of my Focaccias.

gallery_43622_3524_25820.jpg

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Kind regards

Bill

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gallery_44494_2801_795238.jpg

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This is my focaccia ( Dan lepard formula ) ,I havent bake much I only made a whole wheat /rye bread .

Need to get baking going now that is getting cooler ( finally !! ).


Vanessa

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English Muffins (sourdough)

gallery_43622_3524_43935.jpg


Kind regards

Bill

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This is so impressive .. yes, bread! I am in awe of your abilities .. it is something I have never tried ... I am afraid of yeast :unsure: ... and it well may be afraid of me, too! :laugh: Thanks for the beautiful photographs everyone!


Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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Dan Lepard's garlic bread, featured in another thread. Not entirely successful as far as looks go, but instructive and very tasty and made the house smell wonderful. I think it needs to go into a hotter oven. Very very soft dough.

garlic.gif

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I don't use commercial yeast, I'm a dedicated sourdough baker myself.

Basic White Loaves.

gallery_43622_3524_5098.jpg

Kaiser Rolls

gallery_43622_3524_2651.jpg


Kind regards

Bill

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Irish soda bread:

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Don't remeber for sure, but I think it was potato bread. The crust was really brittle after baking, but I put it in a plastic bag after it had cooled and the crust became very chewy (yum!):

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(As you can tell, I'm a newbie bread photographer -- I didn't take pictures of the interior, nor extreme closeups :raz: )

I got both of these recipes from The Ultimate Bread Book (which I picked up after one day just deciding I wanted to learn how to make bread). I've made two other types of bread from that book -- the pictures must still be in my camera. I've been pleased with all the recipes so far. I really like making bread (and eating it!), just wish it didn't take so many hours!

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All the breads look great, but I am especially impressed with the English muffinsby Bill44. Would you tell us what recipe you used or post it? Thanks


Edited by pastrymama (log)

check out my baking and pastry books at the Pastrymama1 shop on www.Half.ebay.com

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this is one of my happy sourdough whites breads....I got 2 slices before the dog ate it

gallery_23695_426_109148.jpg

tracey


The great thing about barbeque is that when you get hungry 3 hours later....you can lick your fingers

Maxine

Avoid cutting yourself while slicing vegetables by getting someone else to hold them while you chop away.

"It is the government's fault, they've eaten everything."

My Webpage

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I've been pleased with all the recipes so far. I really like making bread (and eating it!), just wish it didn't take so many hours!

i think (not that i practice this, but i wish i would) it is a great idea to make your starter/poolish/biga whatever, the night before. then you can throw your loaf/loaves together the next day any time. you can even make your bread dough the night before and allow it to retard in the fridge overnight. the extra time can really help to develop the flavor of the bread. that way, you don't feel like you're spending so much time on it. besides, so much of baking is passive waiting...including waiting for the loaf to cool down enough to eat it :wink:

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One more good one, another sourdough straight from the EGCI...actually its 2 more :laugh:

gallery_23695_426_64403.jpg

tracey

Great...now I want bread. Just fired up the starter again.


Edited by rooftop1000 (log)

The great thing about barbeque is that when you get hungry 3 hours later....you can lick your fingers

Maxine

Avoid cutting yourself while slicing vegetables by getting someone else to hold them while you chop away.

"It is the government's fault, they've eaten everything."

My Webpage

garden state motorcyle association

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This is one of my Focaccias.

gallery_43622_3524_25820.jpg

gallery_43622_3524_3558.jpg

That is beautiful and I am beyond envious. I have tried over and over again to make focaccia and it has failed each and every time. I'm pretty much giving up on it but it is nice to see that it can be done. I can just imagine how good that tastes.

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I've been pleased with all the recipes so far. I really like making bread (and eating it!), just wish it didn't take so many hours!

i think (not that i practice this, but i wish i would) it is a great idea to make your starter/poolish/biga whatever, the night before. then you can throw your loaf/loaves together the next day any time. you can even make your bread dough the night before and allow it to retard in the fridge overnight. the extra time can really help to develop the flavor of the bread. that way, you don't feel like you're spending so much time on it. besides, so much of baking is passive waiting...including waiting for the loaf to cool down enough to eat it :wink:

Yeah, it got too late with one batch of bread and I stuck it in the fridge overnight (during rising I think). It turned out fine, and I did think it had more yeasty flavor.

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