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rjwong

"Baking: From My Home to Yours" (Part 1)

598 posts in this topic

Does it give gram weight equivalents for all ingredients?

I can tell we think alike, sanrensho. This is my pet peeve: baking and pastry books (cookery books as well) with measurements by volume alone. And, correct me if I'm wrong, it seems to only be relevant in US published cookbooks. The dumbing down of Americans. When will we ever get on the metric bandwagon?

I have a question: when American cookbooks are published in other countries, do they convert from volume to weight and add metric equivalents?

Check out Chocolate and Zucchini -- today's entry addresses this very issue and offers an invaluable chart of conversions.

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I know we're going to move over to the new thread, but I just wanted to post this here.

I just received an e-mail from a reader pointing out a typo in the Russian Grandmother's Apple-Pie Cake.  The pan size should be 9-x-13 inches (not 9-x-12). 

I hope ApronStrings see this.

As it turns out, the cake is very forgiving and it would be fine in any pan that comes close to 9-x-13.  The difference in a slightly smaller pan would be thicker layers and the need for a little more time in the oven.

Sorry for the mistake.

Thanks! I DID use a 9x13 pan. I already prepared the Apple-pie cake because I just couldn't wait 2 weeks. I froze it unbaked. The dough was very easy to work with, and had a velvety texture. Can't wait 'til the 22!!!!

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Does it give gram weight equivalents for all ingredients?

I can tell we think alike, sanrensho. This is my pet peeve: baking and pastry books (cookery books as well) with measurements by volume alone. And, correct me if I'm wrong, it seems to only be relevant in US published cookbooks. The dumbing down of Americans. When will we ever get on the metric bandwagon?

I have a question: when American cookbooks are published in other countries, do they convert from volume to weight and add metric equivalents?

Check out Chocolate and Zucchini -- today's entry addresses this very issue and offers an invaluable chart of conversions.

Thanks for posting this, bushey (although the link didn't work for me but choc and zucchini is easy to find). A very informative post by Clotilde and I hope it helps a lot of Americans. But what I truly hope is that everyone over here will get on the weight measurement bandwagon, be it metric or the good old avoirdupois system (ounces and pounds), particularly in baking where accuracy can make a huge difference.

A note on Clotilde's measurements. Flour. AP flour measurements differ according to recipe instructions: sifted? lightly spooned? dip-and-sweep? All require different weights. Cake flour, pastry flour, bread flour...all different weights (as everyone here most likely knows).

I simply want to promote accuracy in baking and get more folks to buy themselves a scale, making their baking attempts so much more likely to work out well so that home baking becomes easier and not so difficult for so many. And hey! Scales promote the use of fewer bowls and utensils and so not as many dishes to wash!


kit

"I'm bringing pastry back"

Weebl

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I too am waiting for the book to be available in Canada. In the mean time, Amazon.ca posted a number of recipes from the book so that we can get a taste before we can hold the book in our (butter-smeared) hands.

The recipes are Toasted Almond Scones, Chockablock Cookies, and Quintuple Chocolate Brownies.

http://www.amazon.ca/Baking-Home-Yours-Dor...=UTF8&s=gateway


Candy Wong

"With a name like Candy, I think I'm destined to make dessert."

Want to know more? Read all about me in my blog.

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Kit, I'd be happy to hop on your bandwagon. Sadly, I don't think we're going to see a shift to weights and scales -- it's just so counter to the way we've always done things. I'm not unhappy with volume measures but, like you, I find weighing ingredients much easier and, as you said, more accurate.

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Maybe I'm supposed to wait until November to ask questions about a specific recipes but...if it's okay, I have a question about the arborio rice pudding. I made that recipe and it was wonderful tasting but it never firmed up in the frig. I cooked it a little longer than the 30 min. recommended because it still looked really runny. Should I have just kept going? I bake a lot but this was my first attempt at rice pudding so I'm no expert.

Anyway, I love your books and I'm looking forward to baking the winter away!

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For people who don't live near a club store, I saw this book at both Borders and Barnes & Noble in the Chicago area last weekend, even though it is not available on their online sites yet.

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Jean, this is not a firm rice pudding (although, if you add the chocolate it is firmer). What was your texture like? Simple as it is, there can be several variables with rice pudding. The cooking time can vary based on the heat you have under the pan and the size of the pan. Low on one range is medium on another. Cooking the mixture longer was a good idea -- you need to boil away the milk until you see the kernels at the top of the pot. If you'd like a thicker pudding, next time reduce the milk to about 2 3/4 cups to 3 cups (but don't do this if you want to make the chocolate version). I'm glad you liked the flavor -- I do too.

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Thank you! I made both the vanilla and chocolate version and I did notice that the chocolate version was slightly thicker. I think I'll take your advice and add a little less milk.

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Kit, I'd be happy to hop on your bandwagon.  Sadly, I don't think we're going to see a shift to weights and scales -- it's just so counter to the way we've always done things.  I'm not unhappy with volume measures but, like you, I find weighing ingredients much easier and, as you said, more accurate.

Thanks for the empathy, Dorie, and the insights into this dilemma from both you and Dan. And if anyone out there in egulletland is writing a baking book in the future, I am now available for hire in order to test and convert your recipes!


kit

"I'm bringing pastry back"

Weebl

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For people who don't live near a club store, I saw this book at both Borders and Barnes & Noble in the Chicago area last weekend, even though it is not available on their online sites yet.

Amazon claims they are already shipping it!


So long and thanks for all the fish.

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Kit, I'd be happy to hop on your bandwagon.  Sadly, I don't think we're going to see a shift to weights and scales -- it's just so counter to the way we've always done things.  I'm not unhappy with volume measures but, like you, I find weighing ingredients much easier and, as you said, more accurate.

Thanks for the empathy, Dorie, and the insights into this dilemma from both you and Dan. And if anyone out there in egulletland is writing a baking book in the future, I am now available for hire in order to test and convert your recipes!

Or you can follow my routine. Once I try a recipe, if I decide I like it, I'll weigh everything the next time I make it and just write the wieghts right into my cookbook. (Yea, I'm sure you pros do this all the time but I was pretty proud of myself the first time I figured this out.)

By the way, picked up the book on Friday and spent the weekend reading it. (Yes, I read all my new cookbooks first.) I'm stunned. There are so many recipes I want to try. I just need more occasions for baking. The book makes me sooooo happy. :biggrin:


So long and thanks for all the fish.

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actually, if it is a recipe that i like and use frequently, i'll weigh it out several time and take an average of the weights so that it is more accurate. especially with the flour and other dry ingredients. liquid, not so much.

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I keep a sheet with a list of common ingredient weights taped to the inside of one of my cabinet doors. I consult that as I'm assembling ingredients, so I weigh everything the first time around, rather than each time measuring out volumes and weighing them.


"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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Is this going to work the way some other baking threads have (I'm thinking of "Baking with Julia," which I followed but didn't join) in which the group picks a recipe to try and reports on the results? Or you just going to have at it?

I bought the book last week and am overwhelmed by choice, so I wouldn't mind if someone else decided for me! Many, many of the recipes look really tempting. I'd pretty much decided to start with the World Peace Cookies, but I could certainly be swayed by some other consensus of opinion.

Susan

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I recieved Dorie's new book last week. Its a large book, with 300 recipes, and I can tell already that I'm going to have a lot of fun baking from it, for a long time to come. This past weekend, I tried my first recipe from it -- the caramel peanut-topped brownie cake (p. 264). Its delicious!

gallery_23736_355_59865.jpg


"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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Oh Patrick! As always, your desserts are GORGEOUS!! I know you and the other members have heard me say this before on other threads, but it's an extraordinary thrill for me to see what everyone does from my books and to know that people are enjoying the recipes. THANK YOU!

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Susan, I think starting with World Peace Cookies is a great idea!

:laugh: I prepared the World Peace cookies today (serving them next week, along with 2 other of your desserts from the book). I used Slitti bittersweet 73% discs, and added a dash of cinnamon to the dough. I froze the dough for an hour, and they sliced without any problem. I wished SOME dough would have crumbled a bit so that I could taste it. I just HAD to eat one! They were exactly as you said. Just fabulous, and I love the way the salt pointed up the flavor. They will be devoured, I am sure... I have a related question. These were originally called Korova cookies. How do you pronounce that? When I say it it sounds like they were baked by a Jewish Prostitute!!! Thanks!!

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I recieved Dorie's new book last week.  Its a large book, with 300 recipes, and I can tell already that I'm going to have a lot of fun baking from it, for a long time to come. This past weekend, I tried my first recipe from it -- the caramel peanut-topped brownie cake (p. 264). Its delicious!

gallery_23736_355_59865.jpg

Absolutely stunning work Patrick! My only complain: where are the rest of the pictures?! This is a tease.


E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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I recieved Dorie's new book last week.  Its a large book, with 300 recipes, and I can tell already that I'm going to have a lot of fun baking from it, for a long time to come. This past weekend, I tried my first recipe from it -- the caramel peanut-topped brownie cake (p. 264). Its delicious!

gallery_23736_355_59865.jpg

Leave it to Patrick! Gorgeous!


Edited by RuthWells (log)

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Is thet the bookcover? :wink:


"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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I recieved Dorie's new book last week.  Its a large book, with 300 recipes, and I can tell already that I'm going to have a lot of fun baking from it, for a long time to come. This past weekend, I tried my first recipe from it -- the caramel peanut-topped brownie cake (p. 264). Its delicious!

gallery_23736_355_59865.jpg

More food porn! I haven't seen the book yet, but will be ordering soon -- sooner now after this picture! (Dorie, you're going to owe Patrick royalties... :wink::raz: )


Cheryl, The Sweet Side

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The photography in the book is stunning, but that picture certainly wouldn't be out of place.

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