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jturn00

Wybauw Books & Discussion

37 posts in this topic

I looked at some of the recipes in wybauw's book, and while I have some good pastry and chocolate experience, as an "amateur" I don't have access to all the ingredients he mentions in some of his recipes. The coconut chocolate lists ingredients like sorbitol, mycryo butter and inverted sugar. [i am still in the process of reading the book on a detail level, but had a craving for a "Mounds" bar so I figured, I'd try making one myself]

I think for inverted sugar I can use corn syrup. But what are your comments about the other items he lists in his ingredients. How about list in the front of the book.

Jeff


Edited by jturn00 (log)

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I looked at some of the recipes in wybauw's book, and while I have some good pastry and  chocolate experience, as an "amateur"  I don't have access to all the ingredients he mentions in some of his recipes.  The coconut chocolate lists ingredients  like sorbitol, mycryo butter and inverted sugar. [i am still in the process of reading the book on a detail level, but had a craving for a "Mounds" bar so I figured, I'd try making one myself]

I think for inverted sugar I can use corn syrup.  But what are your comments about the other items he lists in his ingredients.  How about list in the front of the book.

Jeff

Sorbitol is mostly used to enhance keeping qualities, so leaving it out shouldn't affect the flavor or texture of the finished product. If you really want to use it, try looking at Whole Foods.

Mycryo butter is just cocoa butter that has been processed cryogenically to a powdered form. Unless you are using it in a recipe to set a mousse, you can safely sub regular cocoa butter.

Inverted sugar is NOT the same as corn syrup and I'm afraid subbing the two won't work. Inverted sugar is much sweeter and has emulsifying properties corn syrup or glucose don't have. You can substitute honey, but only if the honey flavor would actually work with your other ingredients. Honey is a naturally inverted sugar, but commercial invert sugar (such as Trimoline) have no flavor other than sweet.

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Personally, I think it's excellent. It's not just a collection of recipes (which are great), but also provides some wonderful scientific information on chocolate.

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Oh god.......someone should handcuff me now.

So my opinion of his book after owning it for like a year............I love the technical info. I've never seen more info. on sugar and chocolates!!! Every Pastry Chef can use and does need this scientific knowledge. It's a teaching manual!!

His actually recipes are maybe a little different then what my tastes are acustomed to. Probably the difference between American and European tastes. I've only made a couple of items and I find I treasure/prefer my ganche recipes from Norman Love more.

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I didn't have access to the web unitl now....

nightscotsman,

Thanks for the help.....

NicoleKaplan,

I've just started the book and really like the info. I think it will really help me develop an better understanding of chocolate and sugar work.

Wendy DeBord,

Did you get Normal Love recipes from a book or just his seminars? How would you describe the major differences between the two that lead to your preference for Norman Love?

Thanks.

Jeff

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Loves ganches are softer/creamier then Wybauw's.

I attended demo's from both men....and obtained a couple formulas from Love at his demo, recieved technical info. from Wybauw's demo. I sincerely hope one day Love publishes a book! It will be a must buy as much as Wybauw's book is. I guess I sort of think of Wybauw as a more of a scientist.......and Love as more of an artist......... But they each are both artist and scientist.

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Help, I'm really struggling with this book. So far, none of the recipes I've tried were repeatable. If you work from this book, would you please suggest a recipe or two that you've really liked? thanks.........

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wendy: would you mind sharing one of love's ganache recipes? i'd be interested to see the difference.

thanks!

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Good morning ,

I am the sales manager for Barry Callebaut chocolate here in the United states and I am very good friends with Jean Pierre Wybauw. We work alot together and we sell the book here in the states. The mycryo is powder form of cocoa butter available from cocoa barry . For the sorbitol you should be able to get that from any distiributor who sells speciality foods. If you have any further questions on the book please feel free to call me at Barry Callebaut 1-800-836-2626 ext. 9938, and I will be happy to answer any other questions.

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wendy: would you mind sharing one of love's ganache recipes?  i'd be interested to see the difference.

thanks!

I'm not comfortable posting Love's recipes because I haven't seen him publish them for public consumption. I do dearly hope one day he'll publish a book on his lifes work!

Theres always differences between one confectioner and another. The thing I'm noticing that's 'unsual' to my American palate is Chef Wybauws use of butter. He uses more quantity in his ganches then other recipes I've made. I'm not used to being able to detect the taste of butter in my ganches.......

Perhaps this is a very European style?

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Anyone heard anything about it? It's listed in the new PCB catalogue, and I found it on French Amazon. Is it only in French? It's called 'Decorations en Chocolat'.

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it's on french amazon, but not available until october. it says to place your order now for delivery when it comes out.

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Anyone heard anything about it? It's listed in the new PCB catalogue, and I found it on French Amazon. Is it only in French? It's called 'Decorations en Chocolat'.

I just took a class with JPW at the Notter school. He had copies of the new book in English which I picked up but have not studied yet.

Dan

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well I searched for the book as well in English but couldn't find it....if you guys find where to get it in English then let me know....and dan....let us know what you think of it when you look it over...

Have a good one,

Robert

www.chocolateguild.com

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Anyone heard anything about it? It's listed in the new PCB catalogue, and I found it on French Amazon. Is it only in French? It's called 'Decorations en Chocolat'.

I just took a class with JPW at the Notter school. He had copies of the new book in English which I picked up but have not studied yet.

Dan

Please let us know if it is worth picking up!

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Chef Rubber has the English version - "Chocolate Decorations" - here for $80.

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Chef Rubber has the English version - "Chocolate Decorations" - here for $80.

neil, you're always one to pick up the new books. have you purchased this one? if so, what do you think of it?

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I'd also like to hear from anyone who has read any parts of this book.

Does it cover chocolate/confectionary making (ie., pralines/bon-bons/truffles) or is it more about decorating cakes/pastries with chocolate?

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I'd also like to hear from anyone who has read any parts of this book.

Does it cover chocolate/confectionary making (ie., pralines/bon-bons/truffles) or is it more about decorating cakes/pastries with chocolate?

If you are after the chocolate/bonbon/truffle making, you want to have a look at his other book Fine chocolates - great experiences, which is a fab book

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Chef Rubber has the English version - "Chocolate Decorations" - here for $80.

neil, you're always one to pick up the new books. have you purchased this one? if so, what do you think of it?

I don't own the book and haven't seen inside it yet. I may drop by Chef Rubber (they are based here in Vegas) to check it out in a couple weeks when I have time.

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I ordered it a couple of days ago. I'll post my opinion when I get it.

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Not only is it well composed, it's packed with innovative techniques.

Decorations of frozen materials. He pipes or spreads the chocolate onto a frozen piece of ss with something like antifreeze inside (kerry can direct you to www.dr.ca for the exact item). Then he manipulates the design into a bird's nest, a cannoli style tube, fragile hair, large fan, spirals wound around a frozen cream horn mold, dipped brass flowers, filigris. The creations are limited to your imagination, but remember to let the chocolate set up either on the frozen slab or in the fridge for about five minutes.

He pipes tempered chocolate (tc) onto ice for a spider web design, pours tc onto tubinado sugar and scrunches it with his hands or leaves it in his intended design for a sparkly appeal.

Makes an impression in cocoa powder (or you choose) with an object, pulls the object out (to make a template of sorts) and pipes tc into the impression.

Pipe tc into a cylinder of freezing alcohol, different size piping holes result in varied widths of "tree trunks" or branches.

Goes over some techniques to decorate polycarbonate molds:

using a paint brush for powder colors

marbleizing the mold with lines of tc that he smears with his finger

egg molds

Makes flower petals with the edge of a palette knife and then curves them in pvc. "glue" with tc at the base and add petals for the desired floral effect.

-flowers with modeling chocolate

-cups with balloons

-leaves

-showpiece advice and demonstrations

-gelatine molds; how to make your own

-using pastry equipment, ie airbrush, latex and silicone molds

-how to achieve specific artistic styles when making a transfer sheet

-curly arches, strips, coils

-coral effect

-large arches for showpieces

-large waves for ""

-cigarettes

-woodgrain

-stencil techniques

-complex drawings

That's pretty much each topic. If anything interests you, PM me and I'll give further instructions.

Ruthie


Edited by ruthie jewell (log)

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