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Q&A: Confectionery 101

202 posts in this topic

Thank you for the nougat lesson! I'll be trying it sometime this week if there is no rain (fat chance, this has been the driest day for weeks. if only I didn't have so much to do this evening.)

I noticed in the photo that you have bottled water, is it preferrable for making nougat/confections in general?

And to make a light chocolate nougat (like a 3 musketeers bar), I was thinking to fold in some bittersweet (72%) chocolate instead of the peanut butter... do you think that will make it fall?

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Thank you for the nougat lesson! I'll be trying it sometime this week if there is no rain (fat chance, this has been the driest day for weeks. if only I didn't have so much to do this evening.)

I noticed in the photo that you have bottled water, is it preferrable for making nougat/confections in general?

And to make a light chocolate nougat (like a 3 musketeers bar), I was thinking to fold in some bittersweet (72%) chocolate instead of the peanut butter... do you think that will make it fall?

I used the bottled water in the photo just to show it was water. Around my house it's water out of the tap for just about everything.

Try with the chocolate, I think it might make a very interesting addition. Make sure it is fairly cool when you add it and just kind of fold it in, rather than doing a lot of beating.

Let us know how it goes.

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Kerry,

Hi. I like to make fudge and caramel that cut up into thick 1" cubes, and I want to use my 8" square Magic Line pans with the removable bottoms, so I want to double the recipes. Would you please tell me how large a pan I would need for the caramel and the fudge, respectively, in order to avoid boil-overs? I'd rather not find out by trial and error! Much thanks!

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Kerry,

Hi. I like to make fudge and caramel that cut up into thick 1" cubes, and I want to use my 8" square Magic Line pans with the removable bottoms, so I want to double the recipes. Would you please tell me how large a pan I would need for the caramel and the fudge, respectively, in order to avoid boil-overs? I'd rather not find out by trial and error! Much thanks!

I think you could easily get a double batch of caramel in the 8 quart pot. I suspect a 6 quart pot would accomodate the fudge, but if you have an 8 quart, then even better.

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Any ideas for candy that can be made in humid weather? I live in tropical Singapore, and it's humid all year round.

I'm pretty sure marshmallows are okay. I made them once from Nightscotsman's recipe, but I didn't beat them long enough as I was afraid I'd not be able to scrape it out.

I made caramels twice, and even letting it set up for 24 hours didn't make it easier to cut. I mostly ended up tearing chunks off rather than cutting, in fact.


May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

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Any ideas for candy that can be made in humid weather? I live in tropical Singapore, and it's humid all year round.

I'm pretty sure marshmallows are okay. I made them once from Nightscotsman's recipe, but I didn't beat them long enough as I was afraid I'd not be able to scrape it out.

I made caramels twice, and even letting it set up for 24 hours didn't make it easier to cut. I mostly ended up tearing chunks off rather than cutting, in fact.

Marzipan would work, fruit jellies or candied fruit rinds. Is there any way you can dehumidify at least your kitchen?

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Ahh kerry , what to say ,Thank you so much for sharing your knowledge and to take the time on doing so.I almost miss the classes because I always goo directly to the baking forum and I forget to look on the main page :rolleyes: Oh well .


Vanessa

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Any ideas for candy that can be made in humid weather? I live in tropical Singapore, and it's humid all year round.

I'm pretty sure marshmallows are okay. I made them once from Nightscotsman's recipe, but I didn't beat them long enough as I was afraid I'd not be able to scrape it out.

I made caramels twice, and even letting it set up for 24 hours didn't make it easier to cut. I mostly ended up tearing chunks off rather than cutting, in fact.

Marzipan would work, fruit jellies or candied fruit rinds. Is there any way you can dehumidify at least your kitchen?

I plan to try candying fruit rinds.

Not without a dehumidifier, I don't think. I'm moving overseas to study next year, so I'm not willing to spend too much on equipment.

Fruit jellies would make great Christmas gifts, so I'll bump them up my to do list. Thanks Kerry!


May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

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Any ideas for candy that can be made in humid weather? I live in tropical Singapore, and it's humid all year round.

You can make fudge and peanut brittle, I used to make it a lot when I lived in the Philippines growing up. Just make sure your thermometer is accurate so the correct amount of moisture evaporates; and it will not last as long without being stored airtight.

Thanks Kerry for the fudge recipe! I was looking for a non-chocolate alternative for variety and this will be perfect! A few questions as always.

About how big is your glass loaf pan on the bottom (just because they vary a lot in how much the sides slope in from the top dimension)?

How many grams/oz in a cup of brown sugar, since everyone measures a bit differently by volume? I go by 240 g but just wanted to check.

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Hi Kerry,

Your recipe for Pecan Fudge is very similar to one my mom used to make during the holidays: Panocha – Brown Sugar Fudge. Actually, she’d make about 8 or 9 different varieties, in addition to 9 or 10 types of Italian Christmas cookies and other treats. I was NOT a thin child… But Happy!

Thanks for sharing your talents.


John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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wow.. This is great!! Just in time for Halloween.

Questions..

#1 For the caramel, it says "Now add the warm cream in 3 or 4 aliquots". What the heck is an "aliquot"?? My best guess says it means "add the warm cream in 3 or 4 additions" (as oppose to dumping it all in at once)

#2 Another question on size of pans. (for the chewy caramel) Would this work OK in a quarter sheet pan?? (I don't have the exact dimensions handy). What about a 8" square glass Pyrex dish?


Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"
jmeeker@eGullet.org

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wow.. This is great!!  Just in time for Halloween.

Questions..

#1  For the caramel, it says "Now add the warm cream in 3 or 4 aliquots". What the heck is an "aliquot"??  My best guess says it means "add the warm cream in 3 or 4 additions"  (as oppose to dumping it all in at once)

#2  Another question on size of pans. (for the chewy caramel)  Would this work OK in a quarter sheet pan?? (I don't have the exact dimensions handy).  What about a 8" square glass Pyrex dish?

Yes indeed an aliquot is an addition. Sorry I should stick to non laboratory english.

I think an 8 inch square pan would be ok, might be a bit hard to get out of the pyrex, but give it a little oiling first. I think a quarter sheet pan might be a bit big, but I too am not sure of the dimensions.

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Any ideas for candy that can be made in humid weather? I live in tropical Singapore, and it's humid all year round.

You can make fudge and peanut brittle, I used to make it a lot when I lived in the Philippines growing up. Just make sure your thermometer is accurate so the correct amount of moisture evaporates; and it will not last as long without being stored airtight.

Thanks Kerry for the fudge recipe! I was looking for a non-chocolate alternative for variety and this will be perfect! A few questions as always.

About how big is your glass loaf pan on the bottom (just because they vary a lot in how much the sides slope in from the top dimension)?

How many grams/oz in a cup of brown sugar, since everyone measures a bit differently by volume? I go by 240 g but just wanted to check.

I'm not at home so I can't measure the pan, but it is just a standard pyrex bread loaf pan. Any average sized bread loaf pan would work, doesn't have to be pyrex.

I actually weighed the brown sugar for this recipe. So I'm not sure how you would convert.

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#2  Another question on size of pans. (for the chewy caramel)  Would this work OK in a quarter sheet pan?? (I don't have the exact dimensions handy).  What about a 8" square glass Pyrex dish?

I've used an 8 inch pyrex before. I line it with two pieces of parchment paper (one in each dimension with excess spilling out over the sides) and oil that - then I can easily lift the entire slab out of the pan for cutting.


Tammy's Tastings

Creating unique food and drink experiences

eGullet Foodblogs #1 and #2
Dinner for 40

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#2   Another question on size of pans. (for the chewy caramel)  Would this work OK in a quarter sheet pan?? (I don't have the exact dimensions handy).  What about a 8" square glass Pyrex dish?

I've used an 8 inch pyrex before. I line it with two pieces of parchment paper (one in each dimension with excess spilling out over the sides) and oil that - then I can easily lift the entire slab out of the pan for cutting.

That sounds like a good idea. I'll give that a try when I do the caramels. (I really want to do those)


Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"
jmeeker@eGullet.org

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Kerry,

Thanks so much for taking the time to do this course! After reading your food blog, we all know what a busy life you have already...so this is much appreciated.

I do have a question regarding brown sugar. You seem to use demerara (or "sugar in the raw" which is a brand name, I think). The usual brown sugar we have available is the moist stuff in boxes. Is there a specific reason you're using the loose demerara? Are the sugars interchangeable?

Sorry if this was already answered.

Thanks again,

Alana

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Kerry,

Thanks so much for taking the time to do this course!  After reading your food blog, we all know what a busy life you have already...so this is much appreciated.

I do have a question regarding brown sugar.  You seem to use demerara (or "sugar in the raw" which is a brand name, I think).  The usual brown sugar we have available is the moist stuff in boxes.  Is there a specific reason you're using the loose demerara?  Are the sugars interchangeable?

Sorry if this was already answered.

Thanks again,

Alana

Even though they are calling this demerara on the package it is really just dark brown sugar, the really moist molassey stuff. Sugar in the raw to me is the dry crystalline, but darkish sugar that you get in packages at coffee shops.

So just look for dark brown sugar, if you can't find it use light brown and add a little extra molasses for flavour.

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Kerry, I just wanted to add my thanks to you for doing these segments! I have already learned a great deal. Now I can't wait to order your chocolate series!

Thanks again! :wub:

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Kerry, I just wanted to add my thanks to you for doing these segments! I have already learned a great deal. Now I can't wait to order your chocolate series!

Thanks again!  :wub:

You are too kind.

Any thoughts on what other confections we should offer in the course?

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Kerry, I just wanted to add my thanks to you for doing these segments! I have already learned a great deal. Now I can't wait to order your chocolate series!

Thanks again!   :wub:

You are too kind.

Any thoughts on what other confections we should offer in the course?

What about toffee? :rolleyes:

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Kerry, I just wanted to add my thanks to you for doing these segments! I have already learned a great deal. Now I can't wait to order your chocolate series!

Thanks again!   :wub:

You are too kind.

Any thoughts on what other confections we should offer in the course?

What about toffee? :rolleyes:

Do you mean like almond roca/skor bar hard toffee?

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Yes, hard toffee. I would like to make some really wonderful toffee then dip it in chocolate....... yummm

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Yes,  hard toffee. I would like to make some really wonderful toffee then dip it in chocolate....... yummm

It could be done, another interesting version might be sponge toffee, it's really good with chocolate too.

I'll PM Jaz and see about doing it.

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Oh I love sponge toffee!

I actually tried once, a few years ago. It was a disaster involving me boiling water in the pan to dissolve all the sugar that hardened in the bottom. LOL.


May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

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