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Carlovski

Vegetarian cookbooks

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I have been using this cookbook since it was initially published in the early 1980s and it remains one of my favorites go-to books for vegetable dishes.  I love the fact that it is arranged by vegetable and not by recipe. So for example if I happen to have a huge head of broccoli, I can just go to the section on broccoli and find a slew of recipes at my disposal. And more importantly, I have never made any recipe from this book that did not come out perfectly -  No failures in over 30 years.

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The Victory Garden Cookbook,  Paperback – July 1, 1982 by Marian Morash


Edited by Smithy Added Amazon-friendly link (log)
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On 7/2/2013 at 9:44 PM, ElainaA said:

Cabbagetown Cafe, a favorite in Ithaca in the 1970's-80's - rivaling Moosewood. I liked it better...

 

Too bad it's gone. :(

I was lucky to eat there a couple times before it closed. :smile:

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