• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

  • product-image-quickten.png.a40203b506711f7664fc62024e54a584.pngDid you know that these all-volunteer forums are operated by the 501(c)3 not-for-profit Society for Culinary Arts & Letters? This holiday season, consider a tax-deductible Quick Ten Bucks to support the eG Forums and help us remain completely advertising-free. Thanks to all those who have donated so far!

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
atcake

ISO Flourless almond cake

17 posts in this topic

I have a client that is gluten allergic. She has requested a flourless almond cake. Does anyone here have something I can use for her? I'm gluten-free ignorant.

Thanks!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

here's one we use in my cooking school. it's pretty fool-proof, and tasty, too:

Valencia Almond Cake

8 oz. blanched almonds

1/2 cup sugar, divided

4 eggs, separated

zest of 2 oranges

2 tablespoons Amontillado Sherry

pinch of salt

Preheat oven to 375. Butter a 9” cake pan.

Place the almonds in a food processor with 2 tablespoons of the sugar. Pulse until the almonds are finely ground.

With an electric mixer, beat the yolks with another 2 tablespoons of sugar. Add the orange zest and the pinch of salt, and beat 2 minutes. Stir the sherry into the ground almonds, then combine this mixture with the yolk mixture.

With an electric mixer, beat the egg whites until soft peaks form. Sprinkle in the remaining 4 tablespoons sugar, a tablespoon at a time, until incorporated.

Add half the egg whites to the almond/yolk mixture and stir to combine. Add the rest of the whites and fold gently to combine. Spoon into the prepared cake pan, and bake 30-35 minutes, until a skewer inserted into the center comes out clean. Cool 10 minutes before removing from pan.

Sprinkle with powdered sugar. We serve the almond cake with vanilla ice cream mixed with sherry, and fresh blueberries.


"Laughter is brightest where food is best."

www.chezcherie.com

Author of The I Love Trader Joe's Cookbook ,The I Love Trader Joe's Party Cookbook and The I Love Trader Joe's Around the World Cookbook

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is my take on the standard "boil two oranges" recipe; has chocolate in it of course.

CHOCOLATE ORANGE CAKE.

INGREDIENTS

2 oranges

6 eggs, separated

300 gm ground almonds

¼ cup good quality cocoa (Callebaut choc powder is very good)

1 cup castor sugar

150 gm dark chocolate, melted and cooled (70% cocoa is good)

1 and 1/4 teas baking powder

METHOD

Boil the oranges about 1 hour, cool, de-seed (easier to use Navel oranges!) and chop in the blender (not too smooth!) Mix with egg yolks and other ingredients.

Fold in the stiffly beaten egg whites.

Greased and lined springform tin (mine is 26 cm), moderate oven 1 ¼ hours.


Happy Feasting

Janet (a.k.a The Old Foodie)

My Blog "The Old Foodie" gives you a short food history story each weekday day, always with a historic recipe, and sometimes a historic menu.

My email address is: theoldfoodie@fastmail.fm

Anything is bearable if you can make a story out of it. N. Scott Momaday

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You guys are awesome! Thanks!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here are two cakes I make all the time, they are both from Claudia Roden's "Book of Middle Eastern Food", but because I've been asked for the recipes a lot, I've rewritten both recipes to reflect my own practic, so I think they're OK as far as copyright goes.

I've specified flour for the pans, lately I've been using oil spray which works just as well, so the flour isn't necessary. I've also used a little caster sugar instead of flour (I'm not sure what caster sugar is in American terminology, it's fine sugar in the grade between powdered sugar and ordinary sugar).

I've done a rough translation of these amounts from lbs and ozs to metric, but it's not a cake where exactness matters hugely.

250g good quality dark chocolate

2 tablespoons milk

125g ground almonds (I like to buy raw almonds with skin and grind them myself in the food processor. The final result is a bit coarser than if you buy ready ground almonds, but you get a nice almondy flavour because the almonds tast fresher. Or you can buy ready ground almond meal.)

6 tablespoons sugar

6 eggs, separated

butter, flour for the pan.

Melt the chocolate with the milk. I like to separate the eggs, beat the whites until stiff, and then beat the yolks separately with the sugar until they are white and fluffy. I think this makes for a cake with a bit lighter texture, but you don't have to do this is you're short of time. Just beat the whites until stiff.

Mix the melted chocolate with the ground almonds, sugar and egg yolks. Fold the stiffened egg whites through.

I've found that the easiest thing to make this cake in is one of those cake tins with the detachable bottoms, ring tins? But whatever you use, you need a reasonable sized one, since the cake rises more than you would expect. Grease the cake tin with butter and sprinke with flour.

Bake in a moderate oven (about 230-250 I suppose) for 3/4 to 1 hour. It's cooked when it's just set in the middle, but a bit of time more or less doesn't make a lot of difference. It's supposed to be a bit squidgy.

The cake will rise a lot, but as it cools it will slump, that's part of the deal. You can get it to slump less if you turn the oven off, open the door and leave the cake to cool slowly. You can sprinkle it with caster sugar, but I prefer cocoa.

It's great hot, or cool, served with cream or raspberry puree. It keeps for days, it freezes well and it's just yummy. It's hard to get wrong really. I've made it so many times that the page in the book is all covered in chocolate blobs and you can't read some bits of the recipe.

Here's another one which is just as easy and just as good to eat. From the same book...you'll get this in groovy restaurants in Melbourne a lot..but it's dead simple to make, you just have to allow more time.

Orange almond cake

2 large or 4 small oranges

6 eggs

250g ground almonds

250g sugar

1 teaspoon baking power

although this is not in the recipe, I add about a tablespoon full of orange flower water, but no big deal if you don't have it.

flour and butter for the cake tin.

Wash, then boil the unpeeled oranges in some water for about 2 hours, or until they've gone very soft. Put the whole oranges through a sieve or something, (to get rid of the pips, although I'm so lazy I just whack them in the food processor and whizz them up pips and all).

Beat the eggs and sugar in a bowl, add the almonds and orange pulp and then cook as above. Same deal with the tin. This cake will take a bit longer to cook, so about an hour, but again, it's very squidgy and heavy. It looks a bit peculiar, but it tastes wonderful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for the additional information. I'll be checking those out.

:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
almonds...zest of 2 oranges...Amontillado Sherry

sounds excellent.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This is my take on the standard "boil two oranges" recipe; has chocolate in it of course.

CHOCOLATE ORANGE CAKE.

INGREDIENTS

2 oranges

6 eggs, separated

300 gm ground almonds

¼ cup good quality cocoa (Callebaut choc powder is very good)

1 cup castor sugar

150 gm dark chocolate, melted and cooled (70% cocoa is good)

1 and 1/4 teas baking powder

METHOD

Boil the oranges about 1 hour, cool, de-seed (easier to use Navel oranges!) and chop in the blender (not too smooth!) Mix with egg yolks and other ingredients.

Fold in the stiffly beaten egg whites.

Greased and lined springform tin (mine is 26 cm), moderate oven 1 ¼ hours.

I saw Miss Nigella make a cake like this---is there no residual bitterness from using all the pith? I know she LIKES bitter and sour tastes more than I do.


Edited by racheld (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've only made it this once (although I plan to make it again this weekend), but I modified the recipe due to time constraints and peeled the citrus so I had less pith than the original recipe (if you do this you have to add juice back in to get the moisture level correct). I think with the sugar bath as suggested in the recipe it would be fine. I liked the purity of my modification however.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am becoming quite a collector of gluten-free recipes since my daughter-in-law was diagnosed with coeliac.

I have made a great flourless cake with ground hazelnuts (and chocolate of course) - not sure where the recipe came from, it might have been a magazine, so I cant post it here because of copyright. If anyone wants it, PM me. Hazelnuts and chocolate do it for me every time.

And no, Rachel, the choc-orange cake is not at all bitter, the long boiling does away with that, and the peel gives a great texture.


Happy Feasting

Janet (a.k.a The Old Foodie)

My Blog "The Old Foodie" gives you a short food history story each weekday day, always with a historic recipe, and sometimes a historic menu.

My email address is: theoldfoodie@fastmail.fm

Anything is bearable if you can make a story out of it. N. Scott Momaday

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, I'm convinced. I'm giving this one a try. I have oranges (satsumas) tucked away on a back burner boiling right now. I'm breaking one of my own rules (when using someone elses recipe, always do it their way the first time) and baking it as small individual cakes so we'll see how it goes.

EDIT: I lied. I have another project going on that requires individual cakes and, since that one is for a paying customer, it gets priority. So time constraints sent the boiled orange cake to a springform after all.


Edited by Tri2Cook (log)

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a really good cake, I'll definitely make it again. I topped mine with a thin layer of milk chocolate and orange ganache before I glazed it. Thanks to The Old Foodie for the recipe and to Rob for making it and inspiring me to give it a try.

gallery_53467_5170_15591.jpg

Sorry about the springform bottom, this one was just for everybody to munch so I didn't bother trying to pretty up the presentation.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a wonderful Cake - Just eliminate the wheat flour.

Torta de Santiago

Almond sponge cake

gallery_38003_2183_702551.jpg

This cake is a specialty of Galicia. The top of the cake is traditionally decorated with a cross in confectioner’s sugar, in honor of Saint James, Spain’s patron saint.

1 lb. (500 g) blanched almonds (about 3 cups)

2 ¼ cups (18 oz/560 g) granulated sugar (used two cups)

¾ cup (6 oz/180 g) (one stick) unsalted butter, at room temperature

7 eggs (used 6 jumbo eggs)

1/3-cup (2 oz/60 g) all-purpose flour

Grated zest and juice of 1 large lemon

Confectioner’s sugar

Pinch salt

Preheat oven 350 degree (180 C) Butter a 9-inch (23-cm) spring form pan

Grind blanched almonds fine

Beat sugar and butter until fluffy – add eggs one at a time

Add almond flour, all-purpose flour, pinch salt and lemon zest

Pour into pan – bake one hour until a toothpick comes out clean

Remove from oven to cool – add lemon juice to pricked top.

When cool and ready to serve – dust top with confectioner’s sugar – decorate with a cross.

Serves 8-10

“Savoring Spain & Portugal”

by Joyce Goldstein

Williams-Sonoma

2000

Jmahl


The Philip Mahl Community teaching kitchen is now open. Check it out. "Philip Mahl Memorial Kitchen" on Facebook. Website coming soon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I noticed that and was a bit disappointed that mine wasn't nice and dark like that. I used Schokinag 64% and Callebaut cocoa. I'm guessing the chocolate makes its presence known better with yours based on the intensity of color. Nobody complained but I do plan to try something a little more intense next time. I also used very finely ground almonds, almost almond flour consistency, so that may have made a difference in the color as well. Not really sure. Overall I was happy with it but there are a few little tweaks I intend to try just for fun. My glaze didn't turn out as nice and dark and shiny as yours either and I followed the recipe you posted to the letter other than the brand of cocoa so I'd say that was possibly a factor in the cake as well.


Edited by Tri2Cook (log)

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Similar Content

    • By JesseK
      Hello,
       
      hoping someone can help me with some workflow questions. I've recently taken over the pastry role in a small tasting menu restaurant and we'd like to produce molded chocolate truffles for either mignardise or take-aways. We have 5 poly trays of molds that hold 40/tray and we'd like to produce roughly that many per week (200). Time and space is tight so I'd like to do this in one go, once per week. The problem I'm having is I don't know the proper workflow for creating this many candies at once. We do not have a tempering machine so it would be stovetop tempering. Is it possible to do that in one go with one big bowl of chocolate? In the past I've made truffles, but always discarded the chocolate after filling the molds. Is it a bad idea to put chocolate from the molds back into the large batch of tempered chocolate? (i.e. fill the molds with chocolate, let the shell set (1-2 mins) then when tipping the chocolate out, can that be tipped back into the large batch?) Also, any tips for large batch tempering of chocolate? We don't have a marble slab so the seeded method is really the only one. The real question is how can I keep a large batch of chocolate tempered for the time it takes to produce 200 molded candies? We have minimal equipment for this kind of operation and I'd be tempering over a double boiler then using ambient heat from a frenchtop to maintain temperature. 
       
      Is this too much to do without a tempering machine? I'm worried about maintaining the temperature of the tempered chocolate during the time it takes to fill 200 molds with filling. I know I can retemper if I lose it but I really need to work fast and efficiently to get this done in the timeframe that I have (~1hr). If anyone has some insight into a workflow it would be much appreciated. 
       
      Thanks,
       
      Jesse
    • By nonkeyman
      I finally found a place better than Molly Moons.
      In Seattle Washington for Ice Cream. I was actually not very found of Molly Moons. It is to cloy for me. Has anyone here been to Sweet Alchemy?(They don't have a website yet...so here is a blurb about them)
       
      It is on 43rd and University Way. I thought it was Haagan Daz still because they haven't changed the banner. It is really good! They just are slightly expensive...3.80$ for their cheapest cone. I forgot to check if they have a children's scoop. They do a lot of fun and solid flavors. A tale of two teas, butter beer, Blueberry Lavender, Chai Tea, etc. They even have a very good vegan option called Monkey Berry Bash! It is made with coconut milk and really is quite good.
       
      Besides the price. I think it is worth to go once!
    • By Darienne
      Yesterday I made my familiar go-to simple lime/cream cheese pie with one egg, some milk, lime juice & zest, etc, covered with a dark chocolate ganache: heavy cream, a dollop of butter.  It's in the fridge covered with a plastic topper but I can cover it with plastic wrap or aluminum foil.

      Today's lunch guest is not coming...onslaught of sleet, freezing rain, and now snow...oh goodie...winter's here...  Now she is slated for next Thursday.  Is there any possibility that the pie can last that long and not poison or at least revolt us?

      Thanks.
    • By cakewalk
      Can cake batter be frozen, then defrosted several days, weeks, or even months later for baking? If so, does this cause any changes in the way the cake bakes? This seems preferable to baking and then freezing the cake(s) because of considerations such as room in the freezer, but mostly, for me, because of time considerations. Has anyone ever done this?
    • By ryangary
      I bought a box of molten chocolate cakes from Presidents Choice that you cook from frozen in the microwave for 45 seconds or so. They come out perfect but the chocolate they use is inferior. My question is, if I was to make my own chocolate cakes let them cool, then freeze them, reheating them in the microwave for the same amount of time would they work. I like the fact that I can have a dozen or so in the freezer and just nuking them when friends pop in. Help me make this work! Please.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.