Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Sign in to follow this  
atcake

ISO Flourless almond cake

Recommended Posts

I have a client that is gluten allergic. She has requested a flourless almond cake. Does anyone here have something I can use for her? I'm gluten-free ignorant.

Thanks!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

here's one we use in my cooking school. it's pretty fool-proof, and tasty, too:

Valencia Almond Cake

8 oz. blanched almonds

1/2 cup sugar, divided

4 eggs, separated

zest of 2 oranges

2 tablespoons Amontillado Sherry

pinch of salt

Preheat oven to 375. Butter a 9” cake pan.

Place the almonds in a food processor with 2 tablespoons of the sugar. Pulse until the almonds are finely ground.

With an electric mixer, beat the yolks with another 2 tablespoons of sugar. Add the orange zest and the pinch of salt, and beat 2 minutes. Stir the sherry into the ground almonds, then combine this mixture with the yolk mixture.

With an electric mixer, beat the egg whites until soft peaks form. Sprinkle in the remaining 4 tablespoons sugar, a tablespoon at a time, until incorporated.

Add half the egg whites to the almond/yolk mixture and stir to combine. Add the rest of the whites and fold gently to combine. Spoon into the prepared cake pan, and bake 30-35 minutes, until a skewer inserted into the center comes out clean. Cool 10 minutes before removing from pan.

Sprinkle with powdered sugar. We serve the almond cake with vanilla ice cream mixed with sherry, and fresh blueberries.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is my take on the standard "boil two oranges" recipe; has chocolate in it of course.

CHOCOLATE ORANGE CAKE.

INGREDIENTS

2 oranges

6 eggs, separated

300 gm ground almonds

¼ cup good quality cocoa (Callebaut choc powder is very good)

1 cup castor sugar

150 gm dark chocolate, melted and cooled (70% cocoa is good)

1 and 1/4 teas baking powder

METHOD

Boil the oranges about 1 hour, cool, de-seed (easier to use Navel oranges!) and chop in the blender (not too smooth!) Mix with egg yolks and other ingredients.

Fold in the stiffly beaten egg whites.

Greased and lined springform tin (mine is 26 cm), moderate oven 1 ¼ hours.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here are two cakes I make all the time, they are both from Claudia Roden's "Book of Middle Eastern Food", but because I've been asked for the recipes a lot, I've rewritten both recipes to reflect my own practic, so I think they're OK as far as copyright goes.

I've specified flour for the pans, lately I've been using oil spray which works just as well, so the flour isn't necessary. I've also used a little caster sugar instead of flour (I'm not sure what caster sugar is in American terminology, it's fine sugar in the grade between powdered sugar and ordinary sugar).

I've done a rough translation of these amounts from lbs and ozs to metric, but it's not a cake where exactness matters hugely.

250g good quality dark chocolate

2 tablespoons milk

125g ground almonds (I like to buy raw almonds with skin and grind them myself in the food processor. The final result is a bit coarser than if you buy ready ground almonds, but you get a nice almondy flavour because the almonds tast fresher. Or you can buy ready ground almond meal.)

6 tablespoons sugar

6 eggs, separated

butter, flour for the pan.

Melt the chocolate with the milk. I like to separate the eggs, beat the whites until stiff, and then beat the yolks separately with the sugar until they are white and fluffy. I think this makes for a cake with a bit lighter texture, but you don't have to do this is you're short of time. Just beat the whites until stiff.

Mix the melted chocolate with the ground almonds, sugar and egg yolks. Fold the stiffened egg whites through.

I've found that the easiest thing to make this cake in is one of those cake tins with the detachable bottoms, ring tins? But whatever you use, you need a reasonable sized one, since the cake rises more than you would expect. Grease the cake tin with butter and sprinke with flour.

Bake in a moderate oven (about 230-250 I suppose) for 3/4 to 1 hour. It's cooked when it's just set in the middle, but a bit of time more or less doesn't make a lot of difference. It's supposed to be a bit squidgy.

The cake will rise a lot, but as it cools it will slump, that's part of the deal. You can get it to slump less if you turn the oven off, open the door and leave the cake to cool slowly. You can sprinkle it with caster sugar, but I prefer cocoa.

It's great hot, or cool, served with cream or raspberry puree. It keeps for days, it freezes well and it's just yummy. It's hard to get wrong really. I've made it so many times that the page in the book is all covered in chocolate blobs and you can't read some bits of the recipe.

Here's another one which is just as easy and just as good to eat. From the same book...you'll get this in groovy restaurants in Melbourne a lot..but it's dead simple to make, you just have to allow more time.

Orange almond cake

2 large or 4 small oranges

6 eggs

250g ground almonds

250g sugar

1 teaspoon baking power

although this is not in the recipe, I add about a tablespoon full of orange flower water, but no big deal if you don't have it.

flour and butter for the cake tin.

Wash, then boil the unpeeled oranges in some water for about 2 hours, or until they've gone very soft. Put the whole oranges through a sieve or something, (to get rid of the pips, although I'm so lazy I just whack them in the food processor and whizz them up pips and all).

Beat the eggs and sugar in a bowl, add the almonds and orange pulp and then cook as above. Same deal with the tin. This cake will take a bit longer to cook, so about an hour, but again, it's very squidgy and heavy. It looks a bit peculiar, but it tastes wonderful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for the additional information. I'll be checking those out.

:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Old Foodie did me right! This was an amazing cake - post #3 above. I ground my own nuts so they were a bit large, but worked fine. Thanks Old Foodie!

gallery_41282_4652_10088.jpg

gallery_41282_4652_13681.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This is my take on the standard "boil two oranges" recipe; has chocolate in it of course.

CHOCOLATE ORANGE CAKE.

INGREDIENTS

2 oranges

6 eggs, separated

300 gm ground almonds

¼ cup good quality cocoa (Callebaut choc powder is very good)

1 cup castor sugar

150 gm dark chocolate, melted and cooled (70% cocoa is good)

1 and 1/4 teas baking powder

METHOD

Boil the oranges about 1 hour, cool, de-seed (easier to use Navel oranges!) and chop in the blender (not too smooth!) Mix with egg yolks and other ingredients.

Fold in the stiffly beaten egg whites.

Greased and lined springform tin (mine is 26 cm), moderate oven 1 ¼ hours.

I saw Miss Nigella make a cake like this---is there no residual bitterness from using all the pith? I know she LIKES bitter and sour tastes more than I do.


Edited by racheld (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've only made it this once (although I plan to make it again this weekend), but I modified the recipe due to time constraints and peeled the citrus so I had less pith than the original recipe (if you do this you have to add juice back in to get the moisture level correct). I think with the sugar bath as suggested in the recipe it would be fine. I liked the purity of my modification however.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am becoming quite a collector of gluten-free recipes since my daughter-in-law was diagnosed with coeliac.

I have made a great flourless cake with ground hazelnuts (and chocolate of course) - not sure where the recipe came from, it might have been a magazine, so I cant post it here because of copyright. If anyone wants it, PM me. Hazelnuts and chocolate do it for me every time.

And no, Rachel, the choc-orange cake is not at all bitter, the long boiling does away with that, and the peel gives a great texture.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, I'm convinced. I'm giving this one a try. I have oranges (satsumas) tucked away on a back burner boiling right now. I'm breaking one of my own rules (when using someone elses recipe, always do it their way the first time) and baking it as small individual cakes so we'll see how it goes.

EDIT: I lied. I have another project going on that requires individual cakes and, since that one is for a paying customer, it gets priority. So time constraints sent the boiled orange cake to a springform after all.


Edited by Tri2Cook (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a really good cake, I'll definitely make it again. I topped mine with a thin layer of milk chocolate and orange ganache before I glazed it. Thanks to The Old Foodie for the recipe and to Rob for making it and inspiring me to give it a try.

gallery_53467_5170_15591.jpg

Sorry about the springform bottom, this one was just for everybody to munch so I didn't bother trying to pretty up the presentation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a wonderful Cake - Just eliminate the wheat flour.

Torta de Santiago

Almond sponge cake

gallery_38003_2183_702551.jpg

This cake is a specialty of Galicia. The top of the cake is traditionally decorated with a cross in confectioner’s sugar, in honor of Saint James, Spain’s patron saint.

1 lb. (500 g) blanched almonds (about 3 cups)

2 ¼ cups (18 oz/560 g) granulated sugar (used two cups)

¾ cup (6 oz/180 g) (one stick) unsalted butter, at room temperature

7 eggs (used 6 jumbo eggs)

1/3-cup (2 oz/60 g) all-purpose flour

Grated zest and juice of 1 large lemon

Confectioner’s sugar

Pinch salt

Preheat oven 350 degree (180 C) Butter a 9-inch (23-cm) spring form pan

Grind blanched almonds fine

Beat sugar and butter until fluffy – add eggs one at a time

Add almond flour, all-purpose flour, pinch salt and lemon zest

Pour into pan – bake one hour until a toothpick comes out clean

Remove from oven to cool – add lemon juice to pricked top.

When cool and ready to serve – dust top with confectioner’s sugar – decorate with a cross.

Serves 8-10

“Savoring Spain & Portugal”

by Joyce Goldstein

Williams-Sonoma

2000

Jmahl

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tri2Cook - see the difference in our guts? I used Valrhona which is so dark - what did you use? I wonder what the taste difference is?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I noticed that and was a bit disappointed that mine wasn't nice and dark like that. I used Schokinag 64% and Callebaut cocoa. I'm guessing the chocolate makes its presence known better with yours based on the intensity of color. Nobody complained but I do plan to try something a little more intense next time. I also used very finely ground almonds, almost almond flour consistency, so that may have made a difference in the color as well. Not really sure. Overall I was happy with it but there are a few little tweaks I intend to try just for fun. My glaze didn't turn out as nice and dark and shiny as yours either and I followed the recipe you posted to the letter other than the brand of cocoa so I'd say that was possibly a factor in the cake as well.


Edited by Tri2Cook (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By Kasia
      Chocolate cake with plums
       
      The first cake I ever dared to bake by myself was a chocolate cake. I have since baked it many times, always using the same recipe, and many times I have spoiled it at the beginning of preparation. It is necessary to cool down the chocolate mixture before adding the rest of the ingredients. On a hot summer day this process is very long, so I accelerated it by putting the pot with the mixture into some cold water in the kitchen sink. Many times, by mistake, I turned on the tap and poured water onto the cooling mixture. In hindsight these situations were amusing, but at the time it wasn't funny.

      This chocolate cake is excellent without any additives. You can enrich it with your favourite nuts or butter icing. Today I added some plums to the top of the cake. It was great and its sweet chocolate-plum aroma lingered long in my home.

      Ingredients (25cm cake tin):
      200g of flour
      150g of butter
      3 tablespoons of cocoa
      120g of brown sugar
      15ml of almond milk
      100g of dark chocolate
      1 egg
      1 teaspoon of baking powder
      plums

      Heat the oven up to 180C. Smooth the cake tin with the butter and sprinkle with dark cocoa.
      Put the butter, milk, sugar, cocoa and chocolate into the pan. Heat it until the chocolate is melted and all the ingredients have blended together well. Leave the mixture to cool down. Add the egg, flour and baking soda and mix them in. Put the dough into the cake tin. Wash the plums, cut them in half and remove the stones. Arrange the plum halves skin side down on top of the cake. Bake for 50 minutes. Sprinkle with caster sugar before serving.

      Enjoy your meal!

    • By Kasia
      Plum tart with almonds
       
      Starting from the first half of August, in the shops and on stands appear the first domestic plums. In September there are so many of them that I have a problem deciding which kind I should choose. Small and big, round and more ovate, violet, red and yellow. You can eat them fresh or make a lot of preserves (jams, plum stew, stewed fruits, pickles, liqueurs, plum brandy). Our favorite are big and round greengage plums, or slightly firm violet plums.
       
      Plums have a lot of valuable attributes. They regulate digestion and protect us from free radicals. Dried plums are more valuable regarding vitamin and fiber content, but they have five times more calories than fresh fruits.
       
      Plums have quite a lot B vitamins, so for a long time they have been well regarded for having a soothing effect on the nervous system and improving our frame of mind. That's why you simply have to make a plum cake. Either now or when the dreary autumn days arrive. Their benign impact on the nerves could be a good excuse for putting another piece of cake on your plate.
       
      I don't like complicated cookery. In this recipe you will find a lot of ingredients, but even so, preparing this delicious cake is very simple.
       
      Ingredients:
      Dough:
      250g of flour
      half a teaspoon of baking powder
      8g of vanilla sugar
      3 tablespoons of sugar
      150ml of 18% cream
      150g of butter
      Filling:
      600g of plums
      1 egg white
      3 tablespoons of minced almonds
      2 tablespoons of brown sugar
      200g of plum stew
      1 teaspoon of cinnamon
      Crumble topping:
      50g of butter
      3-4 tablespoons of flour
      3 tablespoons of brown sugar
      8g of vanilla sugar
      1 egg yolk
      Mix together the dry ingredients for the dough: flour, baking powder, sugar and vanilla sugar. Add cream. Mince the butter and add it to the dry ingredients. Quickly knead into smooth dough. Cover with plastic wrap and leave in the fridge for half an hour.
       
      Heat the oven up to 200C. Cover a baking pan (e.g. for a tart) with the dough, leaving the edges slightly raised around the sides. Whisk the egg white and cover the dough with it. Sprinkle with the almonds and brown sugar. Bake for 14 minutes. Take it out of the oven. Don't turn off the oven.
       
      Make the crumble topping when the dough is in the oven. Melt the butter, cool it a bit then add the flour, sugar, vanilla sugar and egg yolk. Mix it with a fork until you have lumps.
       
      Clean the plums, cut them into halves and remove the stones. Cover the baked base with plum stew, add the plums and sprinkle with cinnamon and the crumble topping. Bake for 20 minutes.
       
       

    • By Kasia
      Pineapple and coconut – the ideal couple
       
      Today, inspired by the recipes from the book "Zielone koktajle. 365 przepisów" ("Green cocktails. 365 recipes") I prepared a light coconut-pineapple dessert. You may make it without sugar if you have enough sweet fruit. If your pineapple isn't very ripe, add a bit of honey to your dessert.

      Ingredients (for 4 people)
      fruit mousse
      1 pineapple
      300ml of coconut milk
      1 banana
      150ml of orange juice
      2 tablespoons of desiccated coconut
      decoration
      50g of butter
      1 tablespoon of caster sugar
      4 tablespoons of desiccated coconut
      4 slices of orange
      fruit

      Blend all the ingredients of the fruit mousse. Put it into some glasses and leave in the fridge. Put the desiccated coconut, sugar and butter into a pan. Fry constantly, stirring on a low heat until the butter is melted. Leave to cool down a bit. Put 2-3 tablespoons of it on top of the desserts. Decorate with a slice of orange, fruit and some peppermint leaves before serving.

      Enjoy your meal!
       
       

    • By Kasia
      Smile of the summer – apricot-peach shortcake
       
      Fortunately, the summer is not only about the weather. There is also fresh, sweet-smelling fruit. Today I would like to share with you the recipe for an easy to make weekend cake. It is excellent for afternoon tea or coffee. A little work and a little baking and after that you may serve and eat, and serve and eat again and again ... I remind you that it should be a weekend cake, so if you eat everything at once, you will need to bake another one 

      Ingredients:
      dough
      200g of flour
      150g of butter
      75g of sugar
      1 egg
      1 egg yolk
      1 teaspoon of baking powder

      fruit:
      1kg of apricot
      4 peaches
      2 packets of powdered vanilla blancmange
      4 tablespoons of brown sugar

      Put the flour, sugar, baking powder and butter onto a baking board. Chop it all up with a knife. When you have the consistency of crumble topping, add the egg and egg yolk and then knead the dough quickly. Divide the dough into two parts – 2/3 and 1/3. Cover the pieces of dough with plastic wrap and put them into the freezer.
      Wash the apricots, remove the stones and cube them. Put them into a saucepan, add a bit of water and boil until they are soft. Stir the blancmange powder in 150ml of cold water and add it to the apricots. Boil for 2 minutes stirring constantly. Turn off the heat. Wash the peaches, remove the stones and cube them. Add them to the apricots and mix them in.
      Heat the oven up to 180C.
      Smooth a 23-cm cake tin with some butter and sprinkle with breadcrumbs. Grate the bigger part of the dough onto the cake tin, even it out and bake for 15-17 minutes. Take out the cake, but don't turn off the oven. Put the fruit mixture onto it and grate the rest of the dough onto the top. Bake for 50 minutes. Sprinkle with caster sugar before serving.

      Enjoy your meal!
       
       

    • By pastrygirl
      I'm watching The Sweet Makers on BBC - four British pastry chefs & confectioners recreate Tudor, Georgian, and Victorian sweets with petiod ingredients and equipment. A little British Baking Show, a little Downtown Abbey. 
       
      Check it it out for a slice of pastry history. 
       
      BBC viewer only available to the U.K., but on this side of the pond where there's a will, there's a way. 
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×