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chappie

Scrapple and its culinary cousins

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I speak from my innard voices here. As a lifelong Eastern Shoreman, scrapple is more than an occasional crispy-fried, gooey-centered breakfast accessory; it is a lifestyle choice, the topic of lavish tales and the source of great legend.

I have conjured the idea of creating a sort of scrapple family tree, setting sail around the globe on a mastication mission to seek out its great grandporks, its second cousins thrice removed, examine their DNA and cultural significance and report back.

Haggis is definitely kinfolk, scrapple's ancestor from the old country. I know of souse in the South, livermush, even something refered to as goetta in (I think) Ohio.

I would differentiate, not in lineage or birth but in, say, language and ritual, between Maryland scrapple presentation and that of Delaware and Philly, where I've had it served so thick it was more warmed carrion pudding.

So dear Adventurers, fill me in on your regional scrap-and-grain, meaty loaf-like contructs. You out there in Krgyzstan, Pilau or the lower nethers of Arkansas -- I want to know about the hoof hash, the snoutmeal, the works of heart.

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Around hog butchering time, when all sorts of hams, bacon, and sausages were being made, my grandmother also made something call pork pudding. I've referenced it on eG before but no one seems to have a recipe for it. Anyway the pork is ground, seasoned and mixed with rice. I haven't seen this for years but I believe that the rice is broken up (ground maybe) before being added. This is then stuffed in a natural casing and ends up not as a ring but in a horseshoe shape. To prepare, again from my dim memories, slice into approximately three inch portions, saute in oil/bacon fat. When its crusty on that side, turn. What happens is that as it fries it softens, does not stay cylindrical like regular sausages, flattens out a bit (meaning that there's more surface area in contact with the hot grease) and some of the pork pudding oozes out each of the cut ends and those parts get extra GBD. A commercial pork pudding used to be sold at Safeway but I haven't seen that in ages. Origin/Grandma Carrie's home: Lone Star, South Carolina.

Edited to add additional comments/clarification.


Edited by divalasvegas (log)

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On Nova Scotia's South Shore, the German heritage shows itself in something called "Lunenburg Pudding." This is a fairly standard-issue black-pudding, IIRC, but I don't recall which grain goes into it along with the pork blood and scraps. It's typically served with sauerkraut, another local specialty.

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I'm thinking the Eastern European Jewish classic variously known as stuffed kishke or stuffed derma would qualify. Especially some of the studlier recipes I've seen out there that have included liver and lungs in the mix, such as this one -- though I think it's rather more common for the intestines/kosher casing/etc. to be stuffed with a simpler mix of just shmaltz and matzoh meal. And one of the classic serving methods--slices pan-fried till GBD--really points up the culinary family resemblance.

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...

Haggis is definitely kinfolk, scrapple's ancestor from the old country. I know of souse in the South, livermush, even something refered to as goetta in (I think) Ohio.

...

While haggis is certainly kinfolk, the old country ancestor is more likely "Saumagen" or 'sow's stomach" from the southern Rhine region of Pfalz (Palatinate) in Germany. I think the majority of German "Pennsylvania Dutch" settlers came from that area of Germany.

Here's some information on Saumagen: click

Saumagen is a German dish popular in the Palatinate (Pflaz). The name means "sow's stomach," but the stomach is seldom eaten. Indeed, it is used like a casing (German Pelle) as with sausage, rather similar to the Scottish haggis. Saumagen consists of potatoes, carrots and pork, usually spiced with onions, marjoram, nutmeg and white pepper, in addition to which the various recipes also mention cloves, coriander, thyme, garlic, bay leaf, cardamom, basil, caraway, allspice, and parsley. Sometimes beef is used as well. The larger ingredients are diced finely. After that, the Saumagen is cooked in hot water and either served directly with Sauerkraut and mashed potatoes or stored in the refrigerator for later use. To warm it again, the Saumagen is fried. The typical drink for Saumagen is a dry white wine.

Saumagen was created in the 18th century by Palatinate farmers who used the left-overs they had to make a new dish. Today the ingredients are not left-overs at all; indeed the butchers creating Saumagen use very high quality ingredients.

Mimi Sheraton has a recipe for Saumagen in her book, "The German Cookbook". Her (probably adapted) recipe includes ground pork, ground beef, minced streaky bacon, bread rolls, potatoes, eggs, onion, s&p and marjoram.

edited to add: Here are some recipes on the web: click and clack and one from Helmut Kohl’s wife, Hannelore: click


Edited by ludja (log)

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Cincinnati has goetta - a blend of pork, oats and onion.

Interesting, I had never heard of this.

click

Goetta" is northwest German dialect for "gruetzewurst," a sausage made of ground pork and grain, says Don Tolzmann, director of German-American Studies at the University of Cincinnati. Many 19th century Cincinnati immigrants came from northwest Germany, which probably explains why goetta was adopted here. Goetta is made by simmering pork (and sometimes beef) parts in water with onion, spices and tiny steel-cut "pinhead" oats. The mixture is cooked until thick, poured into pans and chilled. Goetta then is sliced and fried.

I also came across another German sausage: "Pinkelwurst" described as consisting of pork, onions, oat groats, and bacon.

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There is also a Ukrainian kishka that is made in two ways. The first is with pork, pork blood, buckwheat and spices, and the second is with pork, rice and spices (no blood). The casing is pork intestines. An excellent source for both is Kurowycky's Pork Store in New York.

I was once invited to the home of an Irish friend for Christmas Eve dinner, at which she served black pudding and white pudding. The white pudding tasted a lot like rice kishka, but I believe that oats are used instead of rice or buckwheat.

Ellen

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ponhaus and pudding?

I have absolutely no clue what they are made out of, some sort of pork and filler. I eat ponhaus when I visit my grandparents (who live in Hagerstown, MD). Its pretty big there due to the large mennonite/small amish community.

delicious stuff. I think the ponhaus is traditionally served fried with maple syrup drizzled on top, but I just like it plain

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Haggis is definitely kinfolk, scrapple's ancestor from the old country. I know of souse in the South, livermush, even something refered to as goetta in (I think) Ohio.

...

While haggis is certainly kinfolk, the old country ancestor is more likely "Saumagen" or 'sow's stomach" from the southern Rhine region of Pfalz (Palatinate) in Germany. I think the majority of German "Pennsylvania Dutch" settlers came from that area of Germany.

Here's some information on Saumagen: click

Saumagen is a German dish popular in the Palatinate (Pflaz). The name means "sow's stomach," but the stomach is seldom eaten. Indeed, it is used like a casing (German Pelle) as with sausage, rather similar to the Scottish haggis. Saumagen consists of potatoes, carrots and pork, usually spiced with onions, marjoram, nutmeg and white pepper, in addition to which the various recipes also mention cloves, coriander, thyme, garlic, bay leaf, cardamom, basil, caraway, allspice, and parsley. Sometimes beef is used as well. The larger ingredients are diced finely. After that, the Saumagen is cooked in hot water and either served directly with Sauerkraut and mashed potatoes or stored in the refrigerator for later use. To warm it again, the Saumagen is fried. The typical drink for Saumagen is a dry white wine.

Saumagen was created in the 18th century by Palatinate farmers who used the left-overs they had to make a new dish. Today the ingredients are not left-overs at all; indeed the butchers creating Saumagen use very high quality ingredients.

Mimi Sheraton has a recipe for Saumagen in her book, "The German Cookbook". Her (probably adapted) recipe includes ground pork, ground beef, minced streaky bacon, bread rolls, potatoes, eggs, onion, s&p and marjoram.

edited to add: Here are some recipes on the web: click and clack and one from Helmut Kohl’s wife, Hannelore: click

I am not sure what you mean by adapted. I think with a dish like that, as you point out, there are many possible additions. I got the recipe from a very old German cookbook printed in fraktur. If by adapted you mean American-ized you are wrong. If you mean I combined traditional elements ot suit my taste, you are right.

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divaslasvegas' pork pudding sounds a lot like classic Cajun boudin to me. That's definitely a case of "you don't want to know what's in this" food, but from one of the classic places like Johnson's Grocery in Eunice, definitely a classic. I used to steam boudin and eat it with fried eggs back when I could get it. It's pork sludge, rice, green onions, and cayenne at the minimum, and yes, there's a boudin noir made with blood, but it's illegal to sell in Louisiana. You can still get it under the counter, though, at a lot of butchers if you ask nicely.

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I found this on PA dutch cookery

MEATS: The typical PA Dutch meat dishes use many of the less tender cuts of meat as well as some of the organ and grandular meats, which is rather unusual but fitting as they hate to waste anything, let alone something so nutritious. Tripe, liver, and pig stomach are some of their favorite dishes. Pork scraps are used along with liver, corn meal, and sometimes kidney to make scrapple or ponhaus.

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...

Mimi Sheraton has a recipe for Saumagen in her book, "The German Cookbook".  Her (probably adapted) recipe includes ground pork, ground beef, minced streaky bacon, bread rolls, potatoes, eggs, onion, s&p and marjoram.

edited to add:  Here are some recipes on the web: click and clack and one from Helmut Kohl’s wife, Hannelore: click

I am not sure what you mean by adapted. I think with a dish like that, as you point out, there are many possible additions. I got the recipe from a very old German cookbook printed in fraktur. If by adapted you mean American-ized you are wrong. If you mean I combined traditional elements ot suit my taste, you are right.

The latter interpretation is what I meant; apologies for my ambiguous sentence.

As an aside, I'm enjoying the book, which I just acquired a few months ago, very much. The first thing I made was the delicoius Wesptphalian Cherry Cake, and I'm looking forward to further exploring the book. Thank you very much for this classic book!

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Nice to know it still works..it's been in  print for 41 years and still selling well.

You must have done something right... :cool:

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For those unfamiliar with scrapple, I thought I would describe my recent experience with the delicacy. My wife and I had the good fortune over the weekend to have been invited by a friend out to western Maryland to join his extended family and various friends in their annual scrapple and puddin making. Although I have long enjoyed eating both, the mysteries of their creation was never revealed to me until Saturday.

No written family recipe exists for making these products but several of the seasoned veterans knew, in general, what to do without any discussion. When any questions arose, the family patriarch and host was consulted and his word was gospel. The only key point of dispute that arose was how much pepper to add. Some like a peppery version and others like a more mild version. Complicating the matter on Saturday was a batch of pepper that seemed unusually tasteless and heatless.

This scrapple and puddin was made this year, as in all others, largely with pork, including two heads, livers, hearts, tongues and the leftover bones and scrap from the butchering. Neither the tongue nor most of the heart made it into the final product because they were fished out and used as snacks during the cooking. Because some lamb and venison happened to be on the premises, they were added to the kettles. I was told that in past years a little poultry might end up in the mix.

Once the broth was ready, all of the scraps and bones were removed to a table where the edible parts were separated from the bones and fat. The meat which emerged was taken inside for grinding and while it was being ground, separate slurries of corn meal and flour were mixed and then added to the broth. At that point, the mixture had to be stirred constantly for about an hour and 45 minutes until it thickened. During this process the ground, seasoned meat was cooked in lard in another kettle and, when it was done, a portion was added to the large kettle and the remainder, the puddin, was put in loaf pans to be cooled. Tastes of the insipient scrapple were taken from time to time and the seasoning(salt and pepper only)was adjusted after spirited debate.

As soon as the patriarch determined that the mix was thick enough, the scrapple was dipped from the kettle--approximately 250 lbs. in all--into more loaf pans and set in the basement to cool overnight. Meanwhile, the kettles, meat pans, dippers, stirrer, spoons and whisk were promptly cleaned. The following morning, the scrapple was removed from the loaf pans and wrapped. The process had begun around 8 a.m. and was completed, except for the wrapping, around 4 p.m. The old-timers told me that, years ago, the process began at about 4 a.m. and went until dark because they first had to butcher the hogs and render the lard. Now, the hogs are butchered for them and they use purchased lard.

Scrapple making is a very labor intensive activity and I ended the day tired(and all I did was stirring, straining, and a little cleaning up)and reeking of wood smoke and pig broth. I can imagine that, with uncongenial company, it could seem like real work and perhaps not worth all the bother. That was not the case for me or, seemingly, for the group that gathered on Saturday. My ribs still hurt from all of the laughing and the friend who invited us down even had one of those beer through the nose experiences, something you don't often see from people in their fifties. In addition to the good humor, their was plenty of beer, whiskey, and homemade wine, great food coming down from the kitchen, superb weather, and a remarkable view down the valley through the mountains.

One potential bad omen--the youngest person actually involved in the scrapple-making was about half a century old. I hope, for the family's sake(and for mine if I can wangle another invitation), that the next generations continue to carry on with this tradition when the older generations are no longer able to do so.

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A lovely tale, Meanderer. Where, pray tell, did this ritual take place? At least tell us the state if it wasn't in Pennsylvania!

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(he did say Western Md.)

When you say, "the broths were ready," do you mean they first cooked down a bunch of bones to make the broth, then skimmed the fat off, etc? And then, if that was the process, did they have to remove the meats to cool for awhile? How did they get all the pieces out of the kettles?

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(he did say Western Md.)

When you say, "the broths were ready," do you mean they first cooked down a bunch of bones to make the broth, then skimmed the fat off, etc? And then, if that was the process, did they have to remove the meats to cool for awhile? How did they get all the pieces out of the kettles?

Yep, Maryland, it was.

The bones, organ meats(except for the liver), and scraps were added to water-filled kettles when the fires were lit first thing in the morning and they cooked for several hours. The liver was added much later. The meat and bones were removed with a large strainer that was the size and shape a medium, long-handled sauce pan with quarter-inch holes in its bottom and sides. No fat skimming appeared to be necessary. I was one of the folks straining the meat from the kettles and I didn't notice significant quantities of fat floating on top. I suppose they started with pretty lean scraps for their scrapple.

The meat was barely in the pans before the pickers started working on it. They must be tough people in Maryland. I imagine it cooled pretty rapidly because the temperature was in the 50s, I think.

By the way, I'm eating some as I type this. Perfect texture, excellent meat flavor. It needs a little pepper, however.

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5 hours ago, gfweb said:

My mother learned to like the stuff in Maryland as a child and introduced me to it as a teenager. It is a product that some folks hear about and hate without ever tasting. I was one of the lucky ones who tasted it before I knew anything about it. Once you taste it, hating it is out of the question.

HC


Edited by HungryChris (log)
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