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Buenos Aires Steak


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:rolleyes:

Kind of came at us out of the blue - I mean, I got a call from the writer to fact check some things, but I thought it was going to be an article about the puertas cerradas trend, sort of an exploration of the whys and wherefores, etc. and that we'd be one of a list of places. Truly didn't expect to be the only restaurant featured!

E-mail and phone calls haven't stopped since Saturday night! But, of course, the Times will publish a new article next Sunday and all the foodies will move on to the next recommendation...

Besides, they're just following on the Canadian and Argentine press...

Edited by saltshaker (log)

SaltShaker - Casting a little flavor (and a few aspersions) on the world of food, drink, and life

Casa SaltShaker - Restaurant de Puertas Cerradas

Spanish-English-Spanish Food & Wine Dictionary - a must for any traveler!

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It does remind me why I got out of the New York restaurant business...

It's really been unbelievable - both in sheer numbers (I've accepted around 120 reservations so far over the next three months and turned down probably 60+); but also in having to deal with that New York (or NY Times reading) customer - you know, the "I'm going to be there tomorrow with 17 people, four children, I expect separate menus for them, two people need gluten free, one has a nut allergy, there are two strict vegans, and personally I won't touch red meat, and am deathly allergic to shellfish, though I love foie gras. Oh yes, and no tripe because we simply don't like it. There are a couple of women on a diet in the group, so if you could just do individual tasting menus for each person it would work far better for us. We want a table by the window, but no smoking, and would you please make sure there's a mariachi band to play Happy Birthday to my great Aunt who's 75 - and you'll have to supply a decorated cake. The sixty pesos a person is a bit above our budget, please let me know what discount you're giving us for our courtesy in helping you be successful. Oh, you do know who I am, yes? If you don't accommodate us, I can assure you, no one else from New York will ever set foot in your establishment."

Of course, I'm only guessing at the last sentence or two as I've hung up before that point...

:rolleyes:

SaltShaker - Casting a little flavor (and a few aspersions) on the world of food, drink, and life

Casa SaltShaker - Restaurant de Puertas Cerradas

Spanish-English-Spanish Food & Wine Dictionary - a must for any traveler!

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Has anyone been to Campo Bravo in Las Canitas? How far is this barrio from the Park Tower hotel, how good is the restaurant, and am I likely to be able to get a radio cab there and back on New Year's Eve???

Saltshaker, where is your restaurant? I didn't read the restaurant review you all are alluding to, and wish you much success! Should I even dare to think about going now? I don't want to be trampled by all the New Yorkers!!

Thanks for all your advice!

Roz

P.S. My daughter ate in El Desnivel and had the best steak of her life!

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Campobravo is a pretty basic parrilla in Las Cañitas - a bit trendy, decent steaks, nothing special. I wouldn't count on it being open on New Year's Eve, though one never knows. The vast majority of restaurants here are simply closed for the night. Those that are open, other than neighborhood diner type places are likely to be fixed price menus for a fairly high cost, and by advance reservation only - so have your hotel concierge do some work on getting you something, otherwise you're likely to have very little in the way of options for eating next Sunday night!

Getting to Las Cañitas isn't difficult by cab - probably a 15-20 minute cab ride from your hotel, depending on traffic (it's not, by the way, a barrio, just a neighborhood a couple of blocks by a couple of blocks in the north part of barrio Palermo, that has relatively recently become a hot spot for new restaurants, as it started gentrification). Have your hotel call a cab for you, and the restaurant (if open) call one for you to return - safer anyway for most cab trips.

In terms of us - we're only open Friday and Saturday nights in general, and we only seat 12 people, so there's not much in the way of trampling going on - in fact, we were pretty much booked up before the article for the holidays, so though we had lots of calls and e-mails for this week and next, I simply turned most of them away. January got nicely filled up though as noted in my previous post! The article is reproduced on our site.

SaltShaker - Casting a little flavor (and a few aspersions) on the world of food, drink, and life

Casa SaltShaker - Restaurant de Puertas Cerradas

Spanish-English-Spanish Food & Wine Dictionary - a must for any traveler!

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  • 1 month later...

I'm back from South America(Buenos Aires and Patagonia) and had a fantastic time. Thanks to all for their recommendations on restaurants in Buenos Aires. I was really glad to have the lowdown on parrillas, otherwise I would have naively

followed the suggestions of friends and acquaintances to go to Cabana las Lilas, Casa Cruz, Patagonia Sur, etc.

Here's a brief summary of our dining exploits:

Lunch at bustling Desnivel in San Telmo on a Sunday afternoon-had to wait awhile for a table but it was fun people-watching. Had bife de lomo, papas fritas, ensalada completa for a very reasonable price.

We went to the tail end of the free New Years' Eve symphony concert at the Obelisco, then walked back toward our hotel in Microcentro and luckily got a table at El Establo on Paraguay 489. This parrilla was one of the few restaurants open and was crowded, mainly with locals. The bife de chorizo was huge; I also had cured ham with the sweetest honeydew melon I have ever tasted.

After an amazing breakfast buffet at the Park Tower the next day, we flew to Bariloche to start our Patagonia tour. Best places we found to eat included:

In Bariloche: El Boliche de Alberto(the original one on Villegas 347)- the man who grills the meat takes your meat order. Portions were huge. We had asado(ribs) and chorizo. Excellent house wine. The bill for the 3 of us was 67 pesos(about US$7.50 each)

In El Chalten, a small town catering to trekkers and climbers, we ate 2 nights in a row at Fuegia Bistro on Av. San Martin. We had puree of carrot soup, bife de chorizo with incredible oven-roasted potatoes and fresh vegetables, Patagonian lamb rib chops served with mashed sweet potatoes and roasted vegetables, ensalada completa, ice cream made from Calafate berries, Trapiche Malbec and Sauvignon Blanc.

This tiny bistro had a lovely atmosphere and friendly servers. Definitely a find!

In El Calafate, El Tablita on Coronel Rosales 28 was a popular and lively asador/parrilla. We were lucky to get a table without a reservation at 8:30 PM; people were still coming to eat and waiting for tables when we left. Here we had mixed lamb grill, lomo, mashed pumpkin and potatoes, ensalada completa, malbec and the bill came to 121 pesos(US$13 per person)

In Puerto Natales, Chile, we chose Restaurant Ultima Esperanza on Eberhard 354. Finally a chance for seafood! I had delicious and very fresh small scallops with king crab sauce, while my husband and daughter had abadejo( translated as pollock or cod).

In Punta Arenas, Chile, we tried Damiana Elena, on O'Higgins 694,a small restaurant in an unassuming old building. The interior was delightful, with beautiful antiques and lovely china. The food was outstanding- we had canneloni filled with incredibly sweet centolla(King crab), corvina(sea bass) with olive salsa, avocado salad, pureed spinach, Valle del Maule Misiones de Rengo Sauviognon Blanc,fresh strawberries with cream, and a zabaglione-like dessert with blackberries. We were happy to find that we were the only tourists that night-all the other customers were locals. One woman arrived in a full-length mink coat(despite its being summer, it was a little chilly).

In Ushuaia, we would recommend 2 restaurants. One casual place in a small cottage, Bodegon Fueguino on Av. San Martin 859, didn't take reservations. It was bustling and had a great variety of meat and fish selections. We enjoyed the brochette made with chicken, bacon, and lamb; abadejo(cod) with blue cheese sauce; grilled lamb with mashed pumpkin and papas fritas, washed down with local dark draft Beagle beer. Kaupe, an intimate fine restaurant on a hill overlooking the harbor and mountains, was our splurge. Our party of 5 had carpaccio of veal, ensalada caprese, king crab and spinach chowder, "natural" cold king crab(I'm a purist), merluza(sea bass) with sage and lemon, merluza with vegetables cooked en papillote, with a Lagarde Viognier. Desserts included Marquise, lemon ice cream with raspberry coulis, and crepe. Including tip, this wonderful meal cost US$33 per person.

Back in Buenos Aires, we were able to eat at Don Julio in Palermo Soho for lunch and La Brigada in San Telmo for dinner. The steaks at both parrillas were excellent. La Brigada was a little more upscale, more expensive( US$16 rather than US$8 per person) and had more tourists but was conveniently located, since we walked 2 blocks down Estados Unidos to Bar Sur, where we finally went to a tango show. We liked the intimate size of Bar Sur and got to toast the owner and all the musicians celebrating the 40th anniversary of Bar Sur.

We didn't have time to eat at La Cabrera or Jangada(a restaurant specializing in river fish) but our daughter, who is staying in Buenos Aires for 3 more weeks, had great meals at both these places.

I appreciate all the advice of egullet members on this thread and look forward to returning next year!

Roz

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  • 3 months later...

I have eaten at many steakplaces, but always come back to Cabana La Litas. the other night 500 gr. Baby Beef. $12. and a view on the water, why go anywhere else see my review of Negra Rosa on my site www.gagit.net, and you will stay with the winner Cabana. However for a great experience and beautiful food food, Casa Cruz or Suchre certainly are worth the trip.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Im not a fan of Cabania Las Lilas. IMHO, its an overpriced and over-rated tourist trap. Prices are still attractive if you do your math in USD's or other G7 nation currencies, but for Buenos Aires standards, the place is highway robbery. On top of that, its hugely inconsistent in terms of food quality and service.... I frankly see very little reason to visit this restaurant.

Visit Argentina and try wines from the RIGHT side of the Andes !!!

www.terroir.com.ar

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  • 2 weeks later...

I discovered a new parilla place in San Isidro, right in front of the Racetrack, on Diego Carman. Its called, Cabaña Oasis Parrilla. The restaurant is right next door to the butcher shop of the same name. I need to find the card of the place to post all the details, it seems that unfortunatetly they dont have a website.

Visit Argentina and try wines from the RIGHT side of the Andes !!!

www.terroir.com.ar

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  • 1 month later...
Im not a fan of Cabania Las Lilas.  IMHO, its an overpriced and over-rated tourist trap.  Prices are still attractive if you do your math in USD's or other G7 nation currencies, but for Buenos Aires standards, the place is highway robbery.  On top of that, its hugely inconsistent in terms of food quality and service.... I frankly see very little reason to visit this restaurant.

Gaucho, I dont mean to contradict you but Las Lilas is not a tourist trap but a tourist experience similar to Joes Stone Crab in Miami. Any serious visitor to Buenos Aires should make LA Lilas there first steak experience, after that try the local suggestions and compare. Price should not be the only determining difference. On my last visit, I was told that Negra Rosa was better for steak and upon my visit I found it a real tourist trap for locals.

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I'm back from South America(Buenos Aires and Patagonia) and had a fantastic time. Thanks to all for their recommendations on restaurants  in Buenos Aires. I was really glad to have the lowdown on parrillas, otherwise I would have naively

followed the suggestions of friends and acquaintances to go to Cabana las Lilas, Casa Cruz, Patagonia Sur, etc.

Here's a brief summary of our dining exploits:

Lunch at  bustling Desnivel in San Telmo on a Sunday afternoon-had to wait awhile for a table but it was fun people-watching. Had bife de lomo, papas fritas, ensalada completa for a very reasonable price.

We went to the tail end of the free New Years' Eve symphony concert at the Obelisco, then walked back toward our hotel in Microcentro and luckily got a table at El Establo on  Paraguay 489.  This parrilla was one of the few restaurants open and was crowded, mainly with locals.  The bife de chorizo was huge; I also had cured ham with the sweetest honeydew melon I have ever tasted.

After an amazing breakfast buffet at the Park Tower the next day, we flew to Bariloche to start our Patagonia tour. Best places we found to eat included:

In Bariloche: El Boliche de Alberto(the original one on Villegas 347)- the man who grills the meat takes your meat order. Portions were huge. We had asado(ribs) and chorizo. Excellent house wine. The bill for the 3 of us was 67 pesos(about US$7.50 each)

In El Chalten, a small town catering to trekkers and climbers, we ate 2 nights in a row at Fuegia Bistro on Av. San Martin.  We had puree of carrot soup, bife de chorizo with incredible oven-roasted potatoes and fresh vegetables, Patagonian lamb rib chops served with mashed sweet potatoes and roasted vegetables, ensalada completa, ice cream made from Calafate berries, Trapiche Malbec and Sauvignon Blanc.

This tiny bistro had a lovely atmosphere and friendly servers. Definitely a find!

In El Calafate, El Tablita  on Coronel Rosales  28 was a popular  and lively asador/parrilla. We were lucky to get a table without a reservation at 8:30 PM; people were still coming to eat and waiting for tables when we left. Here we had mixed lamb grill, lomo, mashed pumpkin and potatoes, ensalada completa, malbec  and the bill came to 121 pesos(US$13 per person)

In Puerto Natales, Chile,  we chose  Restaurant Ultima Esperanza on Eberhard 354. Finally a chance for seafood! I had delicious and very fresh small scallops with king crab sauce, while my husband and daughter had abadejo( translated as pollock or cod).

In Punta Arenas, Chile, we tried Damiana Elena, on  O'Higgins 694,a small restaurant in an unassuming old building. The interior was delightful, with beautiful antiques and lovely china. The food was outstanding- we had canneloni filled with incredibly sweet centolla(King crab), corvina(sea bass) with olive salsa, avocado salad, pureed spinach,  Valle del Maule Misiones de Rengo Sauviognon Blanc,fresh strawberries with cream, and a zabaglione-like dessert with blackberries. We were happy to find that we were the only tourists that night-all the other customers were locals. One woman arrived in a full-length mink coat(despite its being summer, it was a little chilly).

In Ushuaia, we would recommend 2 restaurants. One casual place in a small cottage, Bodegon Fueguino on Av. San Martin 859, didn't take reservations. It was bustling and had a great variety of meat and fish selections. We enjoyed  the brochette made with chicken, bacon, and lamb; abadejo(cod) with blue cheese sauce; grilled lamb with mashed pumpkin and papas fritas, washed down with  local dark draft Beagle beer.  Kaupe, an intimate fine restaurant on a hill overlooking the harbor and mountains, was our splurge. Our party of 5 had carpaccio of veal, ensalada caprese,  king crab and spinach chowder, "natural" cold king crab(I'm a purist),  merluza(sea bass) with sage and lemon, merluza with vegetables cooked en papillote, with  a Lagarde Viognier. Desserts included Marquise, lemon ice cream with raspberry coulis, and crepe. Including tip, this wonderful meal cost US$33 per person.

Back in Buenos Aires, we were able to eat at Don Julio  in Palermo Soho for lunch and La Brigada in San Telmo for dinner. The steaks at both parrillas were excellent. La Brigada was a little more upscale, more expensive( US$16 rather than US$8 per person) and had more tourists but was conveniently located, since we walked 2 blocks down Estados Unidos to Bar Sur, where we finally went to a tango show. We liked the intimate size of Bar Sur and got to toast the owner and all the musicians  celebrating the 40th anniversary of Bar Sur.

We didn't have time to eat at La Cabrera or Jangada(a restaurant specializing in  river fish) but our daughter, who is staying in Buenos Aires for 3 more weeks, had great meals at both these places.

I appreciate all the advice of egullet members on this thread and look forward to returning next year!

Roz

Has anyone tried restaurant Jangada that rhorens mentioned in her reply. I will be in BA next week with a friend who is a lover of fish and river fish really interests hima as a eater and a fisherman

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Im not a fan of Cabania Las Lilas.  IMHO, its an overpriced and over-rated tourist trap.  Prices are still attractive if you do your math in USD's or other G7 nation currencies, but for Buenos Aires standards, the place is highway robbery.  On top of that, its hugely inconsistent in terms of food quality and service.... I frankly see very little reason to visit this restaurant.

Gaucho, I dont mean to contradict you but Las Lilas is not a tourist trap but a tourist experience similar to Joes Stone Crab in Miami. Any serious visitor to Buenos Aires should make LA Lilas there first steak experience, after that try the local suggestions and compare. Price should not be the only determining difference. On my last visit, I was told that Negra Rosa was better for steak and upon my visit I found it a real tourist trap for locals.

I think the point (which I agree with, btw) is not that Cabaña Las Lilas is expensive, but that even if you don't care about price, value for money is not worth the visit.

We''ve opened Pazzta 920, a fresh pasta stall in the Boqueria Market. follow the thread here.

My blog, the Adventures of A Silly Disciple.

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Interestingly, a friend of mine is in visiting this week and offered to take me out to dinner at Las Lilas, as he'd ready the RW Apple piece as well. I told him my thoughts, and we popped onto Guia Oleo, the local restaurant review site (www.guiaoleo.com.ar). I'd never looked up how Las Lilas was placed (the ratings, like a Zagat's guide, are based on consumer votes) - it came in 20 out of 30 points on food... 133rd position out of 311 parrillas reviewed!

Anyway, we're off to Don Julio tonight... La Cabrera was full... such is life.

I agree with you on Zagat but that is a review for fake reviewers anyone that hasnt eaten a steak at Las Lalis is missing out. expensive, noisey and popular does not make a restaurant either bad or good as far as food is concerned and Las Lilas is a must to try.

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I didn't get to Jangada but my daughter, who is a good judge of restaurants, ate there last January with a friend and they loved the food- it was a good option if you've already had enough steak and want some variety. Good value, too and good service. Have a great time in BA and drink a lot of Malbec.

Best regards,

Roz

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Im not a fan of Cabania Las Lilas.  IMHO, its an overpriced and over-rated tourist trap.  Prices are still attractive if you do your math in USD's or other G7 nation currencies, but for Buenos Aires standards, the place is highway robbery.  On top of that, its hugely inconsistent in terms of food quality and service.... I frankly see very little reason to visit this restaurant.

Gaucho, I dont mean to contradict you but Las Lilas is not a tourist trap but a tourist experience similar to Joes Stone Crab in Miami. Any serious visitor to Buenos Aires should make LA Lilas there first steak experience, after that try the local suggestions and compare. Price should not be the only determining difference. On my last visit, I was told that Negra Rosa was better for steak and upon my visit I found it a real tourist trap for locals.

I think the point (which I agree with, btw) is not that Cabaña Las Lilas is expensive, but that even if you don't care about price, value for money is not worth the visit.

Value is all relative , i could not disagree more with BTW on the bigger stage Cabana Las Lilas is less than half the price than a restaurant like the Palm in the U. S. and certainly a better value. A more important restaurant like Casa Cruz should not be missed for it certainly is a restauarant on the bigger stage than only BA for food quality and taste and for $50 a person it is one of the best values compared to the best of South Beach, Miami were I live and certainly other restaurants in London and Paris of its nature that I have visited and reviewed on my website,www.gagit.net.I find that if you only listen to remarks on local restaurants you will miss out on what a city has to offer.
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Value is all relative , i could not disagree more with BTW on the bigger stage Cabana Las Lilas is less than half the price than a restaurant like the Palm in the U. S. and certainly a better value. A more important restaurant like Casa Cruz should not be missed for it certainly is a restauarant on the bigger stage than only BA for food quality and taste and for $50 a person it is one of the best values compared to the best of South Beach, Miami were I live and certainly other restaurants in London and Paris of its nature that I have visited and reviewed on my website,www.gagit.net.I find that if you only listen to remarks on local restaurants you will miss out on what a city has to offer.

Value for money means you can either get same quality for less money, or better quality for the same money, which is the case with Cabaña Las Lilas.

I am not comparing it with restaurants elsewhere in the world, but with restaurants in Buenos Aires.

We''ve opened Pazzta 920, a fresh pasta stall in the Boqueria Market. follow the thread here.

My blog, the Adventures of A Silly Disciple.

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Jangada is quite good - they specialize in very simply prepared - i.e., grilled with olive oil and herbs - river fish from the Parana Delta, north and west of the city. The place, likewise, is on the "simple" side - nothing fancy - okay wine list with average prices.

I see we're once again beating the dead cow that is the pro and con of Las Lilas. I think Gaucho and I will probably stand by our assessments from local standards that, touristy or not, it just doesn't deliver on the value - good steaks, yes, generally, though inconsistent - great steaks, no, at least not in comparison to what's available here - service, quite good, which is probably its biggest redeeming factor - and it's certainly one of the top, if not the top, in price for a parrilla.

SaltShaker - Casting a little flavor (and a few aspersions) on the world of food, drink, and life

Casa SaltShaker - Restaurant de Puertas Cerradas

Spanish-English-Spanish Food & Wine Dictionary - a must for any traveler!

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I will be In Buenos Aires at the end of a hiking/running trip through Patagonia over Christmas and New Years.  I love steak and am anxiously reading about the local beef.  I want to go to the "best Place". Many recommend Cabana Las Lilas.

We will be with a group so I can get away one or max two times. RR

this is for all you guys, todays issue of New York times, t syle magazineis about dining finds in Buenos Aires, featured restaurants are La Cabrero,Elles, andJangada, the place for Pacu.

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A shame, since Elles closed almost four months ago... but, if you note, that article was in the style section last November, not this week...

Edited by saltshaker (log)

SaltShaker - Casting a little flavor (and a few aspersions) on the world of food, drink, and life

Casa SaltShaker - Restaurant de Puertas Cerradas

Spanish-English-Spanish Food & Wine Dictionary - a must for any traveler!

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  • 3 months later...
I will be In Buenos Aires at the end of a hiking/running trip through Patagonia over Christmas and New Years.  I love steak and am anxiously reading about the local beef.  I want to go to the "best Place". Many recommend Cabana Las Lilas.

We will be with a group so I can get away one or max two times. RR

I had a steak that was paragonical (for lack of better word) at El Establo (on Florida or Lavalle I think). It's hard to find a bad meal in Buenos Aires. Don't miss Persicco for gelato whatever you do.

Eat Well,

-jbl

The Postmodern Soapbox - NominalTopic.blogspot.com

Twitter: jbzepol

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  • 3 weeks later...

Just had to chime in as we are in BA right now. We have to say we highly recommend Cabaña Las Lilas BECAUSE it is touristy. We have been to three other restaurants for steak before going there and while good, we were getting frustrated. We like our meat rare. After ordering and explaining in both English and our limited Spanish (using the recommended words for ¨juicy¨ and red and even pointing to examples), our meat always arrived with just a little pink in the middle. It seamed to be a case of them knowing better than us the way it should be prepared.

At Cabaña Las Lilas, the cuts were very thick (which we also were not getting at the other places) and red bloody, fatty mounds--exactly what we were looking for! Plus we got pretty lucky and walked up with no reservations and got seated near the water on a beautiful night.

If you can afford it and that´s what you are looking for, then go. We were very glad and spent a third of what it would cost in the states (we didn´t order any sides or wine, we were just there for meat!). Also go to the other places too to experience Argentine style.

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Yeah! yeah! You people rave about yet I can't wait to sink my teeth into a nice juicy and tasteful steak. The taste is what I miss the most perhaps next Summer. Save few for me. Well what the heck! I may not make it further than Monte Grande or Luis Guillon perhaps.

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Through this thread there has been a continual statement that Las Lilas is crazy expensive, yet no one has ever qualified what Expensive is?

Can anyone give me an idea of what a good steak dinner in Ba would normally cost in a decent upscale restaurant? and what Las Lilas would charge for a similar meal?

Just curious....

Thanks

Ryk

Just had to chime in as we are in BA right now. We have to say we highly recommend Cabaña Las Lilas BECAUSE it is touristy. We have been to three other restaurants for steak before going there and while good, we were getting frustrated. We like our meat rare. After ordering and explaining in both English and our limited Spanish (using the recommended words for ¨juicy¨ and red and even pointing to examples), our meat always arrived with just a little pink in the middle. It seamed to be a case of them knowing better than us the way it should be prepared.

At Cabaña Las Lilas, the cuts were very thick (which we also were not getting at the other places) and red bloody, fatty mounds--exactly what we were looking for! Plus we got pretty lucky and walked up with no reservations and got seated near the water on a beautiful night.

If you can afford it and that´s what you are looking for, then go. We were very glad and spent a third of what it would cost in the states (we didn´t order any sides or wine, we were just there for meat!). Also go to the other places too to experience Argentine style.

Veni. Vidi. Voro.

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