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I am trying to replicate Roy Yamaguchi's Blackened Ahi recipe. His blackening spices call for 'ground sandalwood' which is optional. Although I have made this recipe many times, I thought I would try to make it with the sandalwood this time around. He says it is red in color, very aromatic and can be found in Asian markets. He give a source for it in New Orleans.

I was hoping to find it locally. I know there is sandalwood incense but I am not sure it is the same and if it is food friendly.

Could you explain what you want it for? I can give you some sources, but they are not (as I can tell) food friendly.

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I am trying to replicate Roy Yamaguchi's Blackened Ahi recipe.  His blackening spices call for 'ground sandalwood' which is optional.  Although I have made this recipe many times, I thought I would try to make it with the sandalwood this time around.  He says it is red in color, very aromatic and can be found in Asian markets.  He give a source for it in New Orleans.

I was hoping to find it locally.  I know there is sandalwood incense but I am not sure it is the same and if it is food friendly. 

Could you explain what you want it for? I can give you some sources, but they are not (as I can tell) food friendly.

i believe u can find sandalwood only at an indian grocer. i know it is used in indian cuisine for certain things -- apart from it's use as incense. hope that helps. try looking online also. it is an obscure spice so u may have difficulty locating/getting your hands on it.

eta: 3 forms -- sandalwood itself called chandan, sandalwood oil called chandan tel and sandalwood essence called ruh chandan.

u might try this and ask them if u can use it for culinary purposes.

Edited by ohev'ochel (log)
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  • 2 weeks later...

How about calling the Roy's in SF 415-777-0277 and see if they can tell you where they

buy theirs? I am sure they could help, the people who work at all the Roy's are always

so nice. A hui hou!

"You can't miss with a ham 'n' egger......"

Ervin D. Williams 9/1/1921 - 6/8/2004

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  • 13 years later...

Sorry for "bumping" this post. I find this relevant, because as I was searching for culinary grade (edible) sandalwood powder known as "chandan" in Hindi/Hinglish, Google search results lead me to this exact post here on eGullet. I'm curious if the OP, @hapacooking found sandalwood powder that's edible?

 

I was trying to reproduce a recipe from Chef Afraz Shaikh for making Lucknowi Nalli Nihari and Galawati (Galouti) Kebabs and he added some chandan powder into his super masala mix. Elsewhere on eGullet is a reference to "Lazzat-e-Taam," which also calls for sandalwood powder.

 

I found chandan powder at Delhi Bazar and Threading Salon in Fairfield, CA. Right underneath "Chandan Powder" are the texts: "For religious purposes only. Not for human consumption." As I saw that, I quickly placed the item back on the shelf.

 

Thank you for the privilege of your time.

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I think I may have found an edible, food/culinary grade sandalwood powder (chandan powder) from the Santalum album that's native to India. The item is linked at https://lhasakarnak.com/products/sandalwood-white-yellow-powder?variant=34160833549. The herb store is located in Berkeley, CA at:

 

• 1942 Shattuck Avenue, Berkeley, CA 94704

• 2506 San Pablo Avenue, Berkeley, CA 94702 [Pickup location for online purchases as instructed on their website].

 

For 1 oz (~28 g) sandalwood powder will cost 10 USD plus another 10 USD for shipping and handling. Because I am about 40 minutes away, I am going to check out the herb store and if I make the purchase, I'll report/update my findings accordingly. Mainly, from reading about sandalwood (chandan) powder, it should have a smell, if it doesn't, it's some tampered with "sawdust/wood powder."

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