Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

eG Foodblog: Swisskaese - The Israeli Table - Not Just Felafel and Or


Susan in FL
 Share

Recommended Posts

Michelle:

Thanks so much for doing this blog. It's been like a mini vacation for me. So much to see and eat!! I'm jealous of the lovely fruits and vegetables - and those cheeses!! I drool and live vicariously.

Tapenade used the apples to make his famous Charoset for Passover. Charoset symbolizes the mortar that held the bricks together which the Jewish slaves used to build the buildings for the Pharoah. It is typically made of apples, sweet wine, nuts and cinnamon. Tapenade's is in another league. But that is for another thread.

Tapenade and I need to compare notes. I've been making my Sephardic Charoset for several years now, so I think my friends and family are tired of it. I need to try something new. When Passover rolls around again remind Tapenade to share his recipe and add it to RecipeGullet for the rest of us!

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Will you give us your recipe for dates stuffed with lamb? That sounds gorgeous.

And speaking of kitchen appliances (which you were a few pages ago) what is the name of that little cake-baking plug-in thingie that I used to bake cakes in a zillion years ago when I was spending time on a kibbutz in the 70s? It made surprisingly good cakes, without an oven per se.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I want to live where there are pomegranate sculptures on the street! Those are fabulous. This is a very enlightening blog, so many foods I want to find and taste and make now. Thanks for sharing a week with us.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I want to live where there are pomegranate sculptures on the street!  Those are fabulous.  This is a very  enlightening blog, so many foods I want to find and taste and make now.  Thanks for sharing a week with us.

I love these sculptures and their placement also. Great photo!

gallery_28660_3420_118002.jpg

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tapenade and I need to compare notes.  I've been making my Sephardic Charoset for several years now, so I think my friends and family are tired of it.  I need to try something new.  When Passover rolls around again remind Tapenade to share his recipe and add it to RecipeGullet for the rest of us!

Make sure your assessment is correct before altering the recipe, Katie.

Besides "New Coke," "Edge City," a comic strip that runs in The Philadelphia Inquirer that features the adventures of the Ardins, a Jewish family in a Silicon Valleyesque setting, offered another cautionary tale this past Passover.

The storyline involved the family's seder, to which Mr. Ardin's mother always brought brisket. Mrs. Ardin, wanting to put her own stamp on the occasion, discouraged Mother-in-Law from bringing any this year. Hubby went along more or less willingly.

Comes the first night of Passover and Mom Ardin offers her meal. Throughout the traditional recitation--"Why is this night different from all other nights?"--the children register their dissatisfaction--"Because there's no brisket!" Finally, MiL confesses that she snuck some in, and the kids shout for joy.

Now, you know your own family best, so this situation may not apply in your case. But one tampers with tradition at one's peril.

Edited by MarketStEl (log)

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Since this thread started, it seems I can't get away from the Jerusalem grill. Last night my family and I visited the Jerusalem Arts and Crafts Fair, set in The Sultan's Pool, a valley outside the walls of the Old City that houses many art galleries. We drove up from Petach Tikvah through Jerusalem passing Sima's shwarma place on Rechov Agrippas. It was open and busy although most of the neighboring businesses were closed already.

Beautiful to walk down the cobblestoned stairs of the elegant Yemin Moshe quarter under a half moon, brushing past perfumed flowering jasmine bushes and the cinnamony odor cast by fig trees on warm nights. We passed by Sir Moses Montefiore's endearing, old-fashioned windmill and as always, caught our breath before the sight of Jerusalem's crennelated, illuminated Old City walls rising from the surrounding hillside. Just one more transient night in their history; the sounds of the noisy concert in the valley bothered them not at all. (If anyone cares to know, Etnix and Sarit Hadad performed.)

So we joined the throng of folks wending their way around the fair, all admiring (or not) the art, pseudo-art and colorful junk - not to mention standing three-deep at the food booths set up by local restaurants. Booths with kosher certification hung their papers up in front for all to see. A quick look around showed that most of the food was of the hot, starchy, and greasy variety: chorizos, bourekas, fast Asian, and many more - and Sima's shwarma place had a booth there too. My daughters, one grown up and one only nine, wandered away to find something to eat, and the little one came back happily fressing on a pita filled with savory bits of meat and fried onion made tangy with amba. I did not mention turkey testicles.

Miriam

Edited by Miriam Kresh (log)

Miriam Kresh

blog:[blog=www.israelikitchen.com][/blog]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tapenade and I need to compare notes.  I've been making my Sephardic Charoset for several years now, so I think my friends and family are tired of it.  I need to try something new.  When Passover rolls around again remind Tapenade to share his recipe and add it to RecipeGullet for the rest of us!

Make sure your assessment is correct before altering the recipe, Katie.

Besides "New Coke," "Edge City," a comic strip that runs in The Philadelphia Inquirer that features the adventures of the Ardins, a Jewish family in a Silicon Valleyesque setting, offered another cautionary tale this past Passover.

The storyline involved the family's seder, to which Mr. Ardin's mother always brought brisket. Mrs. Ardin, wanting to put her own stamp on the occasion, discouraged Mother-in-Law from bringing any this year. Hubby went along more or less willingly.

Comes the first night of Passover and Mom Ardin offers her meal. Throughout the traditional recitation--"Why is this night different from all other nights?"--the children register their dissatisfaction--"Because there's no brisket!" Finally, MiL confesses that she snuck some in, and the kids shout for joy.

Now, you know your own family best, so this situation may not apply in your case. But one tampers with tradition at one's peril.

That is very funny and a typical story. One year my grandmother wanted to try a new Passover dessert and she almost started a mutiny. :laugh:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Boker Tov everyone.

My breakfasts are rather boring, except on the weekend. So, I am not posting any pictures. I had a Yoplait yogurt with dried apricots, raisins and walnuts and a cappuccino.

Miriam, you write so beautifully. You should think about writing a book.

As Martha Stewart says, "It is a good thing" that you didn't tell your daughter about the turkey testicles. She may have been traumatized for life. :laugh:

I have to run. Will be back later.

Edited by Swisskaese (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I promised Jason that I would post some pictures of Shuk HaCarmel in Tel Aviv. The Shuk is near the original part of Tel Aviv called Neve Tzedek whichs means "Oasis of Justice". It is also next to the Yemenite Quarter. I really like this part of Tel Aviv. The architecture is very special. I will post some pictures of it this evening.

But now.... the Shuk. The Shuk is also next to trendy Tel Aviv and the famous trendy street, let's say a Greenwich Village wanna be, Sheinkin Street. This was my old hood when I moved to Israel. It is filled with trendy shops and cafes. On Friday, the street comes alive with people. The see and be seen crowd. It is also a great place to buy really cool shoes and they are not expensive.

This shuk is primarily outdoors, and you can get lost in the side streets. There are little shops littering the alleys that sell Turkish products, Thai and Philipino products, Chinese, etc. I used to love to take my shuk cart (I don't know what it is called in English) and stroll through the market. I bought everything there and learned all of my Hebrew cooking terms there. The first time I bought chicken wings the butcher asked me if I wanted them singed. I didn't understand what he was asking me, so I said yes. He brought out a blow torch and started singeing the feathers off the wings. I jumped from fright. We had a big laugh about it.

gallery_28660_3420_27829.jpg

gallery_28660_3420_19717.jpg

Did you know that Israel is the third largest flower exporter in the world? On only 2,750 hectares of land, we yield about 1.2 billion flowers. We export over 100 different varieties of flowers.

gallery_28660_3420_8639.jpg

gallery_28660_3420_53394.jpg

gallery_28660_3420_17941.jpg

Edited by Swisskaese (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Before I go back to working..... Can you tell my boss is on vacation? Shhhhh. :rolleyes:

I want to show you a picture of the Zimmer I stayed at in the North last year so you will get an idea of another type of vacation possibility here. I highly recommend staying at one of the hundreds of zimmers in the North. For security reasons right now, I am not going to tell you exactly where it is located.

gallery_28660_3420_201269.jpg

A zimmer. These are purchased as kits from Finland or Romania. I think a few other countries sell these kits, but I can't remember which ones. And you decorate the inside as you wish. As I explained earlier, this one has a four poster bed, fireplace, jacuzzi for two, a kitchnette, dining room table for four people and of course a bathroom. A full Israeli breakfast, including delicious Tunisian briks and homemade jams are included.

gallery_28660_3420_154329.jpg

Beautiful Northern scenery.

gallery_28660_3420_143839.jpg

And another view. Can you see why I love it here?

gallery_28660_3420_33869.jpg

Banana grove at the Sea of Galilee. A huge water waster here. We should really import our bananas.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am loving this blog. The photos are wonderful, in fact I'm inspired to get off my rear end and shlep off to the local shuk with my own shuk cart this afternoon. Lovely pictures of fresh produce strike me that way.

Thank you for your kind words, Michelle. Next time we get together, we'll write up a couple of sketches, eh?

And - I admire your (and Tapenade's) restraint in the face of all that seductive PASTRY.

Miriam

Miriam Kresh

blog:[blog=www.israelikitchen.com][/blog]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[...]I used to love to take my shuk cart (I don't know what it is called in English) and stroll through the market.[...]

My first thought was "shopping cart." Is a shuk cart different from a shopping cart?

Michael aka "Pan"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm also 'travelling'via your blog, Michelle! I definitely wouldn't be able to go Israel ever (my passport says "valid everywhere except israel" ):D so it's very nice to read (and see pictures) about it here.

Inshallah, I hope that will change and I will be happy to show you around.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[...]I used to love to take my shuk cart (I don't know what it is called in English) and stroll through the market.[...]

My first thought was "shopping cart." Is a shuk cart different from a shopping cart?

Yes, they are carts that you purchase for your personal use. They are great for cities like New York where everyone shops on foot. Here is an example:

Shuk Cart

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Michelle:

Thanks so much for doing this blog.  It's been like a mini vacation for me.  So much to see and eat!!  I'm jealous of the lovely fruits and vegetables - and those cheeses!! I drool and live vicariously.

Tapenade used the apples to make his famous Charoset for Passover. Charoset symbolizes the mortar that held the bricks together which the Jewish slaves used to build the buildings for the Pharoah. It is typically made of apples, sweet wine, nuts and cinnamon. Tapenade's is in another league. But that is for another thread.

Tapenade and I need to compare notes. I've been making my Sephardic Charoset for several years now, so I think my friends and family are tired of it. I need to try something new. When Passover rolls around again remind Tapenade to share his recipe and add it to RecipeGullet for the rest of us!

Here is a picture of Tapenade's charoset:

gallery_8006_298_3265.jpg

He is a bit protective of this recipe. He won't even tell my family what is in the recipe. I will try a butter him up for you. :wink:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

gallery_28660_3420_11555.jpg

All sorts of salads. Kubbeh and sambusek on the top. Tapenade didn't take a closeup. :hmmm:

We didn't buy a lot. We bought chickpea flour, nectarines, peaches and the best tehina in the world.... Nablus tehina. It rocks, nothing compares and I will have to meet you in the ring over this tehina if you think yours is better. :raz:

I'm enjoying your blog immensely Michelle. I'm pretty ignorant about Israeli cuisine so this is a wonderful learning experience for me. I do have questions about all of the salads you picture above. I've always enjoyed salads that are of Middle Eastern or Moroccan in origin. What types of salads are pictured here and do you have your own recipes that you'd be kind enough to share?

Inside me there is a thin woman screaming to get out, but I can usually keep the Bitch quiet: with CHOCOLATE!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm enjoying your blog immensely Michelle.  I'm pretty ignorant about Israeli cuisine so this is a wonderful learning experience for me.  I do have questions about all of the salads you picture above.  I've always enjoyed salads that are of Middle Eastern or Moroccan in origin.  What types of salads are pictured here and do you have your own recipes that you'd be kind enough to share?

These are a mixture of Middle Eastern and Eastern European. There is beet salad, carrot salad, cabbage salad, fried eggplant salad, pickled cucumber, fried cauliflower, tabouleh, etc.

We are bit spoiled here and have the luxury of buying premade salads. Paula Wolfert has some recipes for Moroccan salads in her couscous cookbook.

I am going to make a few salads on Friday for Shabbat dinner. I will do a step-by-step and give the recipes. One of my guests is vegetarian. I am also going to take you to a local food fair on Friday. I hope the sweet Druze ladies are there. One of them sells her amazing homemade salads.

Edited by Swisskaese (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You chose carrot juice over lemonana??  :laugh:

I love the fruit sculptures!  Can't wait to see some pictures of Jaffo - I have very fond memories of strolling around town, enjoying a fresh hot borekah - I think you should have a borekah tomorrow.

Lila tov!

I was trying to be healthy. :raz: I see a fresh fruit drink this week. :wink:

Abulafiyah is on the cards for our visit to Jaffo. :wink:

Edited by Swisskaese (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Michelle:

Thanks so much for doing this blog.  It's been like a mini vacation for me.  So much to see and eat!!  I'm jealous of the lovely fruits and vegetables - and those cheeses!! I drool and live vicariously.

Tapenade used the apples to make his famous Charoset for Passover. Charoset symbolizes the mortar that held the bricks together which the Jewish slaves used to build the buildings for the Pharoah. It is typically made of apples, sweet wine, nuts and cinnamon. Tapenade's is in another league. But that is for another thread.

Tapenade and I need to compare notes. I've been making my Sephardic Charoset for several years now, so I think my friends and family are tired of it. I need to try something new. When Passover rolls around again remind Tapenade to share his recipe and add it to RecipeGullet for the rest of us!

Here is a picture of Tapenade's charoset:

gallery_8006_298_3265.jpg

He is a bit protective of this recipe. He won't even tell my family what is in the recipe. I will try a butter him up for you. :wink:

Thanks Michelle! Tapenade's charoset looks very good, and fairly similar to mine. Lots more fruits, nuts and spices than the standard "mortar". I suspect our recipes have just a few variations between them.

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We have a special treat for you on Thursday evening. You are all invited to a wine tasting at one of our favourite cookery shops.

The shop is called Zaafran. which means Saffron. The owner, Michel is a lovely man. Take a look at their website. It is in Hebrew, but you can look at the photos.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By Duvel
      The first week of November are „autumn holidays“ in the area where I live. We wanted to use that time to go to Paris, but when my parents-in-law somewhat surprisingly announced they‘d be coming over from Spain for the whole of November, we scrapped that idea and looked for something more German …
       
      So … Berlin. Not the best time to travel (cold & rainy), but with a couple of museums for the little one and the slightly older ones to enjoy together, plus some food options I was looking forward it was a destination we could all agree on. The Covid19 warnings in the Berlin subway support that notion …
       

       
    • By liuzhou
      Note: This follows on from the Munching with the Miao topic.
       
      The three-hour journey north from Miao territory ended up taking four, as the driver missed a turning and we had to drive on to the next exit and go back. But our hosts waited for us at the expressway exit and led us up a winding road to our destination - Buyang 10,000 mu tea plantation (布央万亩茶园 bù yāng wàn mǔ chá yuán) The 'mu' is  a Chinese measurement of area equal to 0.07 of a hectare, but the 10,000 figure is just another Chinese way of saying "very large".
       
      We were in Sanjiang Dong Autonomous County, where 57% of the inhabitants are Dong.
       
      The Dong people (also known as the Kam) are noted for their tea, love of glutinous rice and their carpentry and architecture. And their hospitality. They tend to live at the foot of mountains, unlike the Miao who live in the mid-levels.
       
      By the time we arrived, it was lunch time, but first we had to have a sip of the local tea. This lady did the preparation duty.
       

       

       
      This was what we call black tea, but the Chinese more sensibly call 'red tea'. There is something special about drinking tea when you can see the bush it grew on just outside the window!
       
      Then into lunch:
       

       

      Chicken Soup
       

      The ubiquitous Egg and Tomato
       

      Dried fish with soy beans and chilli peppers. Delicious.
       

      Stir fried lotus root
       

      Daikon Radish
       

      Rice Paddy Fish Deep Fried in Camellia Oil - wonderful with a smoky flavour, but they are not smoked.
       

      Out of Focus Corn and mixed vegetable
       

      Fried Beans
       

      Steamed Pumpkin
       

      Chicken
       

      Beef with Bitter Melon
       

      Glutinous (Sticky) Rice
       

      Oranges
       

      The juiciest pomelo ever. The area is known for the quality of its pomelos.
       
      After lunch we headed out to explore the tea plantation.
       

       

       

       

       
      Interspersed with the tea plants are these camellia trees, the seeds of which are used to make the Dong people's preferred cooking oil.
       

       
      As we climbed the terraces we could hear singing and then came across this group of women. They are the tea pickers. It isn't tea picking time, but they came out in their traditional costumes to welcome us with their call and response music. They do often sing when picking. They were clearly enjoying themselves.
       

       
      And here they are:
       
       
      After our serenade we headed off again, this time to the east and the most memorable meal of the trip. Coming soon.
       
       
    • By FoodMuse
      Hello everyone,
      eGullet was nice enough to invite me to write a food blog chronicling what I've made or eaten out for one week. I'm so excited about it! Thanks guys.
      About me:
      I dream about food, I wake thinking what's for dinner and I'm so excited to share it with you. I'm part of the food world in New York. By that, I just mean that I'm so fortunate enough to be invited to great events where I get to eat great food. I'm also a nerd and a part of the technology world. I produce, edit and sometimes host food related web videos and I'm also a part of the tech world.
      I'm launching a website called Please, Pass the Gravy. www.pleasepassthegravy.com We let you create a menu, invite friends and then collaborate on that menu. Never host another potluck with 8 pasta salads. You could use it now, but we're alpha launch, it works but it's ugly. It's my ugly baby. So, if you use it be kind and message me if you have improvement ideas. I thought it would be ok to write about it here because it is food related.
      I live in Brooklyn with a lovely guy who likes to eat and a small corgi mix dog. I cook pretty much every night and do a nice brunch on the weekend. I am not a crazy dog lady, but I do admit to cooking food for the dog. I have an excuse, beyond doting, he had seizures that have stopped since not feeding him dog food.
      Foods I cook:
      Spicy foods! If you look at my blog I have a simple papaya ketchup with habanero that is pretty darn good.
      I love great cheese. This may be the week for Beer Cheese Soup.
      I try to limit carbs, though I do cheat.
      In any given week C. and I probably eat cauliflower, broccoli and green beans as a side.
      Tonight's dinner will be Vietnamese inspired. We'll see how it goes. I'll post about it as soon as I can.
      Any requests? Questions? I'd love to hear from you.
      -Grace
    • By Duvel
      In these challenging times, a full summer vacation is not an easy task. For the last 1.5 years we have been mostly at home with the clear plan to visit Catalonia (or more precise my wife’s family) latest this summer. And it looked good for a while. Unfortunately, the recent rise in case numbers in Spain have resulted in …
       
      OK, let’s skip this part. Long story short - my wife and me are fully vaccinated, as are >90% of the people we care about in Catalonia. After some discussion (after all, Germans tend to prefer to be on the safe side of things) we simply fueled up the car, got each a test (for the transit through France) and started to drive …
       
      After a leisurely 11h drive we arrived at a small fishing town somewhat north of Barcelona around 3.00am. We unloaded the car and my wife an the little one went straight to bed. 
       

       


      I found an expired beer in the elsewise pretty empty fridge and enjoyed the cool breeze on the terrace. Holidays, here we come …
       

    • By liuzhou
      Last week, Liuzhou government invited a number of diplomats from Laos, Malaysia, Indonesia, Myanmar/Burma, Poland, and Germany to visit the city and prefecture. They also invited me along. We spent Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday introducing the diplomats to the culture of the local ethnic groups and especially to their food culture.
       
      First off, we headed two hours north into the mountains of Rongshui Miao Autonomous County. The Miao people (苗族 miáo zú), who include the the Hmong, live in the mid-levels of mountains and are predominantly subsistence farmers. Our first port of call was the county town, also Rongshui (融水 róng shuǐ, literal meaning: Melt Water) where we were to have lunch. But before lunch we had to go meet some people and see their local crafts. These are people I know well from my frequent work trips to the area, but for the diplomats, it was all new.
       
      So, I had to wait for lunch, and I see no reason why you shouldn't either. Here are some of the people I live and work with.


       
      This lovely young woman is wearing the traditional costume of an unmarried girl. Many young women, including her, wear this every day, but most only on festive occasions.
       
      Her hat is made from silver (and is very heavy). Here is a closer look.
       

       
      Married women dispense with those gladrags and go for this look:
       

       
      As you can see she is weaving bamboo into a lantern cover.
       
      The men tend to go for this look, although I'm not sure that the Bluetooth earpiece for his cellphone is strictly traditional.
       

       
      The children don't get spared either
       

       
      This little girl is posing with the Malaysian Consul-General.
       
      After meeting these people we went on to visit a 芦笙 (lú shēng) workshop. The lusheng is a reed wind instrument and an important element in the Miao, Dong and Yao peoples' cultures.
       

       

       
      Then at last we headed to the restaurant, but as is their custom, in homes and restaurants, guests are barred from entering until they go through the ritual of the welcoming cup of home-brewed rice wine.
       


      The consular staff from Myanmar/Burma and Malaysia "unlock" the door.
       
      Then you have the ritual hand washing part.
       

       
      Having attended to your personal hygiene, but before  entering the dining room, there is one more ritual to go through. You arrive here and sit around this fire and wok full of some mysterious liquid on the boil.
       

       
      On a nearby table is this
       

       
      Puffed rice, soy beans, peanuts and scallion. These are ladled into bowls.
       

       
      with a little salt, and then drowned in the "tea" brewing in the wok.
       
      This is  油茶 (yóu chá) or Oil Tea. The tea is made from Tea Seed Oil which is made from the seeds of the camellia bush. This dish is used as a welcoming offering to guests in homes and restaurants. Proper etiquette suggests that three cups is a minimum, but they will keep refilling your cup until you stop drinking. First time I had it I really didn't like it, but I persevered and now look forward to it.
       

      L-R: Director of the Foreign Affairs Dept of Liuzhou government, consuls-general of Malaysia, Myanmar, Laos.
       
      Having partaken of the oil tea, finally we are allowed to enter the dining room, where two tables have been laid out for our use.
       

       
      Let the eating, finally, begin.
       
      In no particular order:
       

      Steamed corn, taro and sweet potato
       

      Bamboo Shoots
       

      Duck
       

      Banana leaf stuffed with sticky rice and mixed vegetables and steamed.
       

      Egg pancake with unidentified greenery
       

      Stir fried pork and beans
       

      Stir fried Chinese banana (Ensete lasiocarpum)
       

      Pig Ears
       

       
      This may not look like much, but was the star of the trip. Rice paddy fish, deep fried in camellia tree seed oil with wild mountain herbs. We ate this at every meal, cooked with slight variations, but never tired of it.
       

      Stir fried Greens
       
      Our meal was accompanied by the wait staff singing to us and serving home-made rice wine (sweetish and made from the local sticky rice).
       
       
       
       
      Everything we ate was grown or reared within half a kilometre of the restaurant and was all free-range, organic. And utterly delicious.
       
      Roll on dinner time.
       
      On the trip I was designated the unofficial official photographer and ended up taking 1227 photographs. I just got back last night and was busy today, so I will try to post the rest of the first day (and dinner) as soon as I can.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...