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Toronto Eating at Its Most Fun


SarahB
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The wontons in tomato sauce were gross.  A asian wonton in a heavy tomatoe caper/oregano flavoured sauce -- fusion at it's worst.

this might not be as outrageous an example of "fusion" as you think (I refer here to the concept, not the taste...). Tomato, and other seemingly incongrous (cream? cheese??) sauces are common on "Hong Kong-style cafe" menus -- sorry, don't know how to properly translate the genre...

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  • 3 weeks later...
What is the best place to eat on Sunday, November 12th?  And why?

I assume Lai Wah Heen will be open, I think that's already where I decided to go. Just wondering, and this thread sounds great, if there is something else unique for this part of the country in T.O. Or if anybody has any inside tips for me like Sunday is the chef's day off etc:nudge, nudge, wink, wink:, and don't hold back, I'm in the business, and I'll know anyway, then I'll blame you for not telling me.

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What is the best place to eat on Sunday, November 12th?  And why?

...and don't hold back, I'm in the business, and I'll know anyway, then I'll blame you for not telling me.

way to make friends and influence people, coquus~! :smile::biggrin::laugh:

"The cure for anything is salt water: sweat, tears, or the ocean."

--Isak Dinesen

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I'm fond of OMI for omakase - but I haven't been to Kaji (gasp!). And while I can't personally reccommend this place yet, I've been meaning to go to Sakura Kaiseki on Church to have their Kaiseki style menu. Very very different than the Japanese you're used to if all you've had is sushi and udon. Call for reservations, I think. Not sure how busy they are, but they did get highly rated in NOW Magazine recently.

foodpr0n.com 11/01/17: A map of macarons in Toronto // For free or for a fee - bring your bottle! corkagetoronto.com

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< this might not be as outrageous an example of "fusion" as you think (I refer here to the concept, not the taste...). Tomato, and other seemingly incongrous (cream? cheese??) sauces are common on "Hong Kong-style cafe" menus >

oy!

to think this is a common combo is terrifying.

My dh & I still refer to this as one of the worst dishes we have EVER had. It was horrible, however realistic it might be.

k!

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Yeah, that sounds great I read about it in the other thread, I may give it a go, if so I'll let you know. Otherwise, why the gasp, are you showing your shock at yourself for avoiding Kaji, or is it really, really expensive.

more the "I haven't gone yet!" gasp. :)

foodpr0n.com 11/01/17: A map of macarons in Toronto // For free or for a fee - bring your bottle! corkagetoronto.com

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  • 4 weeks later...

Does anyone remember a place (I doubt it's still there) called Etherea on Bloor Street in Toronto??? It was in a high rise on the first floor, a health food restaurant. I used to work there.

And I do not remember the name of it, but I used to get fresh made pierogis at a little place near Kensington Market--mmmm good.

I loved everything in Toronto.

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I think it was Ethereal Natural Foods, and it was in the building that housed Rochdale in the early 70's...now an senior citizens residence.

You could buy pot from dealers at the Zumburger across the street.

Rochdale's motto at the time was "I feel more like I do now, than I did when I first came here."

Ethereal had a good California sandwich, I recall, that had cheese, avocado, tomato and sprouts on whole grain bread. But the washrooms were definitely to be avoided.

Long gone.

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Marlowe, you remembered!!!

Oh, you didn't have to cross the street!! :raz:

I have no remembrance of the washrooms. But I lived upstairs--way upstairs somewhere in a commune.

That sandwich was awesome wasn't it, still noteworthy with crispy toasted wonderful bread. Ronnie made them with guacamole. I remember making apricot pizza with honeyed tofu, peanut butter cookies slathered with apple butter and big thick chewy oatmeal cookies slathered with applesauce or peanut butter.

Oh man those were awesome 'natural' foodie days. Huge pots of applesauce. I did half the baking. Mary and I worked opposite each other, four ten hour days then four days off, four on four off. We lived on Humberside or Humberdink or something or that was my subway stop.

We had a great Christmas, I made split pea soup and special S bread made with sassafras tea, soy flour and sunflower seeds. Ronnie's dog ate the turkey or was it ham? I stayed up all night to bake Mary's fruit cakes 'cause she was starting her four days on and time was getting away from her--wonderful fruit cakes made with beautiful dried fruits. She soaked the cakes in meade. I made baklava with rosewater to send home with some halvah from Kensington Market.

Yes, it was called Etherea. I also baked for the House of Emmaus, the best carrot cake I ever made for the opening of their coffeehouse. Like 35 years ago. It was an unusually mild winter, '71, '72.

What was Rochdale's I don't remember.

Edited by K8memphis (log)
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What was Rochdale's I don't remember.

Rochdale was built in the mid 60's on Bloor St. near Spadina with CMHC mortgage money. I beleve a group counter-culture people (including Dennis Lee) organized a company to take over the high rise while it was still being built They kept up the payments and opened Rochdale College, and residences. Two floors were aboriginal; the other floors were counter culture, and easy to get into. There were a lot of free or low cost courses, and also drug dealers; the cops loved his, because traffic was mostly in one place. By the mid 70's the college had failed and the place was bankrupt, so CMHC took it back and it became a senior's residence. I'm not sure what it is now.

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