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Dessert uses for Brioche


cjsadler
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Now that I've started honing my brioche skills, I'm wondering what other dessert uses it can be put to. Obviously, there's bread pudding and french toast, but what else can be done with it?

Chris Sadler

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Now that I've started honing my brioche skills, I'm wondering what other dessert uses it can be put to.  Obviously, there's bread pudding and french toast, but what else can be done with it?

Try Nancy Silvertons' Sandwich Book...

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Don't discount French Toast as haute cuisine. There was a huge discussion on the now-defunct Winterland's restaurant French Toast as they used a brulee torch to caramelize the surface and served it with an amazing lavender-scented ice cream.

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take the brioche, decrust it, and use it to line a very well buttered ramekin or some sort of casserole, then stuff said lined dish to your heart's content, and cap with a round of bread followed by more butter. After baking (about 400) for a few minutes the outside should be nice, golden brown and buttery. My favorite is a mix of nuts and cheese with some dried fruit, and a bourbon creme anglaise.

Brioche also works exceedingly well as the bread component of rolled buns.....remember, the more butter in the filling, the better.

then of course, it's always good on its own

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Nancy Silverton's brioche sticky buns are the best things on the planet. You can find the recipe in her Pastries From the LaBrea Bakery and in Baking With Julia (Greenspan). JC's book also has Silverton's brioche tart with mystery sauce (I think that's what it's called, anyway something like that) which is delicious and is the dessert that moved Julia Child to tears on the show. "A triumph!" she exclaimed and then literally dissolved into tears and laughter. It's a wonderful moment. And it's a wonderful brioche.

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Have you seen this one

Marzipan Filled Brioche Bread Pudding

If you bake it in a pretty baking dish, it makes a lovely presentation. I use one of these Polish pottery bakers. I have the rectangular "Blue Horizon" and "Festive Garden" and ovals in two sizes - those patterns are not on this site. I got them at Williams-Sonoma.

In my great grandmother's journal she noted, "Basil, who has no adventure in his soul, chose an ice of pears. I chose a lovely egg custard that held a surprise, a little bun stuffed with marchpane flavoured of rosewater. I sought m'sieur the pastry cook to ask if he would share his secret /other than to say the eggs must be fresh and the milk still warm from the cow, he had little to impart."

She then goes on to describe the structure of the dish in detail and her ideas of how it was composed.

Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Now that I've started honing my brioche skills, I'm wondering what other dessert uses it can be put to.  Obviously, there's bread pudding and french toast, but what else can be done with it?

Amazing what miscellaneous bits of information I have rattling around in my head. :hmmm: I recalled that there was a thread about summer puddings which you can access here. Your brioche would seem to work well with ripe summer berries.

Inside me there is a thin woman screaming to get out, but I can usually keep the Bitch quiet: with CHOCOLATE!!!

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You can also split your Brioche batch in half, roll them each into equal size rectangles (can't remember the dimensions at the moment), sprinkle on some dried apricot pieces that have been rehydrated with a little brandy, then roll them up (like making a jelly roll) and then braid them together. If you REALLY want to get creative, make three strands instead of two.

Instead of the apricots, you could do a marzipan filling as well.

Good luck!

Edited by tino27 (log)

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Just came up with this but make some sort of dessert using a sandwich maker or use the ravioli sealer device. (Like an empinada) Cut the crusts and brush the brioche with a simple syrup using kirsch. Fill the brioche with chocolate and cherry jam (like a black forest cake). Decorate the plate using chcolate and cherry sauces. (Cherries?)

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I make a Poached Pear Brioche Torte..Roll out some chilled brioche 1/4" thick and place it in a 1" high flan ring. Trim the dough so you have about a 2" overhang and flip the overhang back into the ring and press against the sides to seal. Spread a thin layer of frangipan over the bottom of the dough and chill for about 1 hour. Place poached pears with the seeds removed around the edge of ring and a hanfull of black or blueberries in center, egg wash dough and bake at 400 on some parchment untill dough is golden brown. I have a picture of one but I wasnt sure how to post it ?

Pat

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Then there's a Bee Sting Cake and a Tarte Tropezienne. Both are basically a brioche baked in a 9 or 10" cake pan, torted, and filled with a pastry cream. Bee sting has honey and almonds on top.

Cheryl, The Sweet Side
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Then there's a Bee Sting Cake and a Tarte Tropezienne.  Both are basically a brioche baked in a 9 or 10" cake pan, torted, and filled with a pastry cream.  Bee sting has honey and almonds on top.

The tarte tropezienne in one of Pierre Herme's book is a fabulous item. You can also make a baba au rhum by cutting a cap off the top of the brioche a tete, hollow it out, soak it in rum sugar syrup, let it drain and pipe it full of pastry cream and glaze it with hot apricot. A rosette of creme chantilly, a sliver of candied cherry and a mint leaf, and it's 1966 again.

I used to work for a Romanian pastry chef who made a cheese filling with ricotta, sharp cheddar, cream of wheat to hold it together, and a lot of black pepper. She would wrap squares of brioche around it and bake it. Called it a blechinka. I've used brioche dough a lot with a cinnamon pecan filling to make braided coffee cake rings.

Edited by McDuff (log)
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I do love tarts in a brioche dough.

In this case a used a pastiera filling because I had extra

imgp12733mt.jpg

Recipe? Looks fabulous.

Devlin, thanks. It was really good indeed but the filling would be quite elaborate, I would use instead of this just a pot the cream (egg yolks, milk and cream, plus sugar) plus some almonds, it would be easier. It was around Easter and I was making pastiere, so having a left over of filling I tried it.

The brioche dough I don't remember with recipe I used (french one will work, example Jacques Pepin recipe)

Filling (recipe from Elisabetta Cuomo from an Italian forum.

For the brioche tart maybe I used only 1/5 of this quantity.

Ricotta cream

400 g ricotta

400 g sugar

3 whole eggs and one yolk

Sift the ricotta and make a cream with the other ingredients.

Wheat berries cream

1 jar of cooked wheat grain 580 g (you'll find it in italian stores, or you have to soak the berries in water, cook long until the burst open)

30 g of butter

1,5 dl milk

a pinch of salt

cook the wheat with the other ingredients for 10' costantly stirring. let cool.

To make it simplier you can use barley or other berries which don't require soaking.

Pastry cream

300 g milk

100 g sugar

2 yolks

50 g flour (of half starch)

lemon and orange zest

Make a pasty cream

Incorporate the three creams, add a touch of orange liquor and 8 drops of fiori di arancio, a pinch of cinnamon and vanilla essence, 100 g of small pieces of candied fruit (orange, citron, zuccata)

Edited by Franci (log)
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I know, I know . . . you said you were looking for something other than bread pudding and french toast, but the Boysenberry Brioche Bread Pudding ala Heather Ho, in Sherry Yard's Secrets of Baking, looks so smokin' good I have to at least mention it.

"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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